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Thyroid cancer spread to Lymph Nodes
 
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What is metastasis? Where do tumor cells travel? The spread of thyroid cancer depends on the type of thyroid cancer you have. Watch this video to learn about the different types.
Просмотров: 4203 Thyroid Cancer Care Collaborative
My Thyroid Cancer Story - My Thyroid Cancer has spread.
 
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Well sh*t, here we are a video series I didn't think I would have to make, on 03/10/2016 I was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. I will be vlogging my treatment, thoughts and recovery when I can. If you are watching this and have any questions please ask. I hope someone finds these useful. If you like you can subscribe to follow my story. Instagram @meettheplaters Twitter @asksenseiplater @meettheplaters Instagram @meettheplaters Twitter @asksenseiplater @meettheplaters
Просмотров: 3015 Joe Plater
Metastatic Thyroid Cancer
 
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This is a patient who presented with arm pain. Frontal and lateral radiographs of the humerus were obtained. In the mid diaphysis of the humerus, there is a lytic lesion within the medullary cavity with an associated pathologic fracture as indicated by the red arrows on both radiographs. This lesion has a poorly defined margin but there is no radiographic evidence of a discrete soft tissue mass. In a patient over the age of 40, the leading differential considerations of a lytic lesion with pathologic fracture is metastatic disease and multiple myeloma. The most common cancers which demonstrate lytic osseous metastases include lung, kidney, and thyroid cancers. This patient had a history of follicular thyroid cancer. PF248
Просмотров: 871 CTisus
Thyroid Cancer: Metastatic Disease, How Much Radioactive Iodine. Dr. Kwak. ThyCa Conference
 
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Treatment of Metastatic Thyroid Cancer: How Much Radioactive Iodine Should Patients Receive. Jennifer Kwak, M.D., Nuclear Medicine Physician
Stages of thyroid cancer
 
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Просмотров: 2252 Mariam Ahmed
Radioactive Iodine After Thyroid Cancer
 
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Radioactive iodine is a common treatment for thyroid cancer after the thyroid cancer surgery. We take advantage of the fact that the thyroid gland needs iodine to make thyroid hormone. In this video, Dr. Clayman discusses when to consider radioactive iodine in the treatment of thyroid cancer. Most of the common thyroid cancers will take up iodine just like normal thyroid cells. When you take a radioactive iodine pill, the radioactive iodine can go directly to thyroid tissue and thyroid cancer cells. The purpose of radioactive iodine is to kill any thyroid tissue and most importantly to kill any thyroid cancer cells that may still be in your neck. Radioactive iodine is not necessary for all thyroid cancers. Radioactive iodine is typically used for thyroid cancer that has grown outside of the thyroid gland, for example into the muscle on top of the thyroid gland. This observation, however, relies upon the expertise of the surgeon. Radioactive iodine is also indicated when the thyroid cancer has spread to lymph nodes or to distant sites. Your thyroid surgeon’s experience and observations will play a critical role in determining whether you should have radioactive iodine therapy. Your endocrinologist will manage the administration of the radioactive iodine. It will not make you sick, and will not make your hair fall out.
Просмотров: 6534 Clayman Thyroid Cancer Center
Can thyroid cancer spread quickly
 
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Can thyroid cancer spread quickly - Find out more explanation for : 'Can thyroid cancer spread quickly' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Просмотров: 20 moibrad2c
Types Of Thyroid Cancer | Thyroid Cancer Treatments - Manipal Hospitals
 
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This video is an informative animated presentation that explains in detail about Thyroid cancer and treatment . Thyroid cancer is a disease that begins in your thyroid gland. If you have thyroid cancer, it may be one of four types, depending on the type of thyroid cell in which the cancer started and the appearance of the cancer cells. Papillary carcinoma is the most common thyroid cancer and begins in follicular cells. Follicular carcinoma accounts for 1 in 10 cases and also begins in follicular cells. Medullary carcinoma is less common and starts para-follicular cells. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is a rare, more dangerous form of thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer, like other cancers is an unrestrained growth of cells due to damaged genetic material in the cell’s nucleus. A tumour forms as the cells begin to accumulate. Overtime, a lump form in your thyroid as the tumour enlarges you may feel a lump in your neck over the thyroid gland. You may have neck or throat pain, coarseness and trouble swallowing as the tumour grows around the trachea. Watch the video to know more about types and treatment of thyroid cancer. Visit here for more details - http://manipalhospitals.com/diabetes-thyroid-care/ Best Hospital in India: Manipal Hospitals is one of the top multi-speciality hospital in India located at all major cities like Bangalore, Vijayawada, Visakhapatnam, Goa, Salem, Jaipur, Mangalore. Provides world class 24/7 Emergency services. Our top surgeons are expertise in offering best treatment for Heart, Brain, Cancer, Eye, Kidney, Joint replacement surgery & all major surgeries at affordable cost. Health Check-up packages are also available. To know more visit our website : https://www.manipalhospitals.com/ Get Connected Here: ================== Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ManipalHospitalsIndia Google+: https://plus.google.com/111550660990613118698 Twitter: https://twitter.com/ManipalHealth Pinterest: https://in.pinterest.com/manipalhospital Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/manipal-hospital Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/manipalhospitals/ Foursquare: https://foursquare.com/manipalhealth Alexa: http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/manipalhospitals.com Blog: https://www.manipalhospitals.com/blog/
Просмотров: 80576 Manipal Hospitals
Where Does thyroid cancer spread to
 
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Where Does thyroid cancer spread to - Find out more explanation for : 'Where Does thyroid cancer spread to' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Просмотров: 4 saiful saiful
Thyroid cancer - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is thyroid cancer? Thyroid cancer is a type of cancer affecting the thyroid gland. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Просмотров: 62272 Osmosis
I Have Thyroid Cancer
 
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Over the years here on Sparkle Me Pink I have shared many personal stories. Today I am here to tell you all about my total thyroidectomy surgery. This video does a brief overview of whats going on with me. Please head on over to my blog post for all the details :-) http://www.sparklemepink.com/2016/11/i-might-have-cancer.html I want to start off by saying that I am not a medical professional. I am not writing this to give medical advice. I am sharing my health story friend to friend style to raise awareness of this condition. Please see your doctor for proper care and medical attention. I have been told, by my doctor that I may have Thyroid Cancer. Now, don't freak out ! It's going to be ok. I will explain everything. I am having surgery on November 8, 2016. If you are watching this when it is first posted then I am most likely in surgery. Your love, hugs, prays and positive thoughts are greatly appreciated ! UPDATE: Surgery went well. I am currently hanging out in my recovery room. I did end up having to have my whole thyroid taken out ( thyroidectomy ) because the nodule tested positive for papillary cancer. I'm not even sure exactly what that means or what further treatment I will need. All I know is burping used to be funny and it is not funny right now lol ! In quite a bit of pain but I have an ice pack on and reading all of your encouraging comments are honestly helping me get through the night. I will update you all in a video as soon as I am able to talk. My voice is weak and I just sound like I have a really bad cold. Which I'm sure Logan is getting a kick out of me not talking his ears off for once ;-) I am staying positive and trying to keep a smile on my face. After all I am not the only one out there who has ever had to deal with this nor is it something I can change. Again thank you all for the support. Will update more soon. _________________________________ Be sure to stay connected with Sparkle Me Pink by SUBSCRIBING and Following me on : BLOG: http://www.sparklemepink.com FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/SparkleMePink8 TWITTER: https://twitter.com/SparkleMePink8 PINTEREST: http://pinterest.com/SparkleMePink8 INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/SparkleMePink8 SNAPCHAT: @sparklemepink8 EMAIL: sparklemepink88@gmail.com beauty, bargains, sparkle, make up, sparkle me pink, michelle marino, cosmetics, makeup, tutorial, demo, review, product review,
Просмотров: 125946 Michelle Marino
Metastasis of a squamous cell lung cancer. Secondary thyroid cancers - case 10.
 
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Complete case history on http://www.thyrosite.com/thyroid/227/index.htm
Просмотров: 295 Tamas Solymosi
TYPES OF THYROID CANCER
 
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There are several different types of thyroid cancer, which are classified based on how similar they look to normal thyroid cells under a microscope and by the type of cell from which they develop. 1. Papillary carcinoma Papillary carcinoma is the most common type of thyroid cancer, accounting for approximately 80 percent of cases. Papillary carcinomas are slow growing, differentiated cancers that develop from follicular cells and can develop in one or both lobes of the thyroid gland. This type of cancer may spread to nearby lymph nodes in the neck, but it is generally treatable with a good prognosis (outlook for survival). 2. Follicular carcinoma Follicular carcinoma is the second most common type of thyroid cancer, and accounts for approximately one out of 10 cases. It is found more frequently in countries with an inadequate dietary intake of iodine. Follicular carcinoma is also a differentiated form of thyroid cancer. In most cases, it is associated with a good prognosis, although it is somewhat more aggressive than papillary cancer. 3. Hürthle cell carcinoma Hürthle cell carcinoma, also known as oxyphil cell carcinoma, is a subtype of follicular carcinoma, and accounts for approximately 3 percent of all thyroid cancers. 4. Medullary thyroid carcinoma Medullary thyroid carcinoma develops from C cells in the thyroid gland, and is more aggressive and less differentiated than papillary or follicular cancers. Approximately 4 percent of all thyroid cancers will be of the medullary subtype. These cancers are more likely to spread to lymph nodes and other organs, compared with the more differentiated thyroid cancers. 5. Anaplastic carcinoma Anaplastic carcinoma is the most undifferentiated type of thyroid cancer, meaning that it looks the least like normal cells of the thyroid gland. As a result, it is a very aggressive form of cancer that quickly spreads to other parts of the neck and body. It occurs in approximately 2 percent of thyroid cancer cases. Article Credit: http://www.cancercenter.com/thyroid-cancer/types/ Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkVKbsi4wOka3tK0IWPFKRA/videos
Просмотров: 242 Disease Fact
4 Signs Of Thyroid Cancer You Should Watch Out For
 
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4 Signs Of Thyroid Cancer You Should Watch Out For You get regular mammograms to screen for breastt cancer and see a dermatologist to make sure you don't have skin cancer, but is thyroid cancer even on your radar? Maybe it should be: Rates seem to be skyrocketing, as the number of people diagnosed with it has doubled since the 1970s. Women, in particular, seem to be at risk. (Here’s a rundown of the 9 most important medical tests for women.) While that sounds scary, there's no reason to panic, says Ilya Likhterov, MD, assistant professor of otolaryngology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. "While it's true that thyroid cancer diagnoses are on the rise, we're usually talking about papillary thyroid cancer, which is the least aggressive type." He also explains that a rise in diagnosis doesn't necessarily mean that more people are getting it—just that doctors are doing a better job of catching it. Many people today have ultrasounds and other scans for totally unrelated health issues, and those tests sometimes end up picking up very small thyroid nodules. Even if they turn out to be cancerous, many of these are so tiny and slow-growing that they might not ever cause problems during your lifetime. That said, not all thyroid cancers are so innocuous, so it's smart to see a doctor if you notice any of the following symptoms: A lump in your neck The thyroid gland is located in the front of your neck, but any bump that doesn't disappear on its own within a few weeks should be checked out, says Likhterov. "If thyroid cancer has already spread to the nearby lymph nodes, the mass might be on side of the neck where the lymph nodes are instead of in the front where the thyroid gland is. Trouble swallowing As a mass grows it could interfere with your ability to swallow. As with a lump, if this issue doesn't go away in a few weeks (like a cold or other virus that might cause swelling in the throat would), it's worth getting checked out. Voice changes Your voice box sits right on top of your thyroid," so changes to the gland could make you chronically hoarse, says Likhterov. (If your voice is just hoarse from a sore throat, these 14 home remedies can help.) Trouble speaking, eating, or breathing These symptoms probably wouldn't occur unless the cancer is very advanced, but they all warrant immediate medical attention. (This is what cancer experts do to lower their risk of the disease.) Treatment options If you do develop thyroid cancer, your treatment options will depend on the size and stage of your tumor. "Some tumors that are less than 1 centimeter—micro-papillary thyroid cancer—can actually be left alone," says Likhterov. Since these are so slow-growing, your doctor might postpone treatment and simply send you for an ultrasound every six months to make sure nothing has changed. (Likhterov likens it to active surveillance for prostate cancer.) Larger or more aggressive tumors will need to be removed right away, but you won't necessarily need to have your entire thyroid taken out. That used to be the norm, says Likhterov, but if you take out the whole thyroid you'll need to be on thyroid hormones for the rest of your life; there's also a risk of injuring the nearby parathyroid gland, which controls calcium balance in the body. Nowadays many patients only have half of the thyroid removed (the part with the tumor), which allows you to dodge these side effects. Depending on the specifics of your case, you might also need radiation, chemo, or a "targeted" medication. Help us to be better Like, Comment, Subscribe and invite all your friends to see our videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUOF1_1_fY50PVN0TtItbDQ?sub_confirmation=1 More from Stay Healthy: 1. The Top 9 Signs That Your Infant May Have Autism. #6 Really Surprised Me! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRLeGCR-I54 2. 10 Early Warning Signs and Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFgNPnRDogw 3. 16 Early Signs and Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpMW-3KOZ_o 4 Signs Of Thyroid Cancer You Should Watch Out For By Stay Healthy
Просмотров: 326 STAY HEALTHY
Recurrent Thyroid Cancer - How Do We Know? What Do We Do?
 
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In this thyroid cancer video, Dr. Clayman discusses the importance of choosing your surgeon and ultrasonographer to ensure your thyroid cancer is cured with your first surgery – and does not reappear years later. The importance of an experienced, knowledgeable thyroid cancer surgeon is key to curing you. As discussed in earlier videos in this thyroid cancer series, the knowledge of how thyroid cancer behaves and the observations of the thyroid cancer surgeon during surgery are critical to properly removing not just the thyroid, but potential involved lymph nodes that could contain cancer. Recurrence of thyroid cancer in the neck is usually not recurrence at all. Instead it is cancer that was present during the first operation that was not removed by the first surgeon and over time it grows and is detected. It is also possible that this “recurrent” thyroid cancer was present prior to the first cancer operation but was not detected by ultrasound or other scans. It is important to have an expert thyroid cancer evaluation done, which involves a high definition ultrasound and a CAT scan to determine the extent of the thyroid cancer for its complete removal. If this did not happen with your first operation you want the most experienced, expert surgeon for your next surgery. Do not make the same decisions again which brought you to have recurrent or persistent thyroid cancer.
Просмотров: 2165 Clayman Thyroid Cancer Center
Thyroid cancer :  What is the prognosis and survival rate for patients with thyroid cancer?
 
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Please *LIKE || COMMENT | | SHARE | | SUBSCRIBE* to support this channel. For more info visit http://www.DiseasesAndTreatment.com/ ====================================== Thyroid cancer : What is the thyroid gland? https://youtu.be/qrjeV3vI02o Thyroid cancer : What is thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/yPO74xBgD54 Thyroid cancer : What causes thyroid cancer? Risk factors? https://youtu.be/m9qaZsL9hsI Thyroid cancer : What are the symptoms and signs of thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/QNuEHOwf_YA Thyroid cancer : What are the different types of thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/Nc35fbnGHfI Thyroid cancer : How do doctors diagnose thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/8-U9qBPrPHw Thyroid cancer : How is thyroid cancer staging determined? https://youtu.be/UE3dZwpeEt0 Thyroid cancer : What is the medical treatment for thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/OzZDxbJEa34 Thyroid cancer : What is the prognosis and survival rate for patients with thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/oRXBbYr2va4 Thyroid cancer : Is it possible to prevent thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/JucRLgGbkZk ====================================== The thyroid gland produces thyroid hormones which are important in the normal regulation of the metabolism of the body. Thyroid cancer is three times more common in women than in men. There are four major types of thyroid cancer: papillary, follicular, medullary (MTC), and anaplastic. The cause of thyroid cancer is unknown, but certain risk factors have been identified and include a family history of goiter, exposure to high levels of radiation, and certain hereditary syndromes. The National Cancer Institute recommends that anyone who received radiation to the head or neck in childhood be examined by a doctor every one to two years to detect potential thyroid cancer. The most common signs and symptoms of thyroid cancer include a lump, or thyroid nodule, that can be felt in the neck, trouble swallowing, throat or neck pain, swollen lymph nodes in the neck, cough, and vocal changes. If a lump in the thyroid is found, the only certain way to tell whether it is cancerous is by needle or surgery biopsy and examining the thyroid tissue obtained. A CEA blood test, physical exam, X-rays, CT scans, PET scans, ultrasounds, and MRIs may also be used to help establish a definitive diagnosis and determine staging. Surgery is the most common form of treatment for thyroid cancer that has not spread to other areas of the body. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and radioactive iodine treatment are also medical treatment options in addition to surgery. The survival rate and prognosis of thyroid cancer depends upon a few factors, including the individual's age, the size of the tumor, and whether there is metastasis or spread of the tumor. It is not possible to prevent most cases of thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer is the third most common solid cancer tumor in children and the most common endocrine malignancy.
Просмотров: 660 Dr. Warraich Health Channel
Thyroid cancer is not a cancer anymore
 
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An international panel of doctors has decided, that a type of tumor that was classified as a cancer, is not a cancer at all. The reclassified tumor is a small lump in the thyroid, that is completely surrounded by a capsule of fibrous tissue. The panel said that its nucleus looks like a cancer, but the cells have not broken out of their capsule, and surgery to remove the entire thyroid, followed by treatment with radioactive iodine is unnecessary and harmful. Source: New York Times Narrator: World Talk Compiler: Read Aloud News Producer: Atigamedia
Просмотров: 25275 Read Aloud News
Neck Dissection for Thyroid Cancer - Do I Need It?
 
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Neck dissections are advanced operations for the removal of lymph nodes of the neck. If you have a thyroid cancer, there are two types of neck dissections that may or may not be indicated for you as discussed in this video by Dr Gary Clayman. Neck dissections are not necessary or indicated for all thyroid cancers. The two most common types of neck dissections for thyroid cancer are the 1) Central Neck Dissection and 2) Lateral Neck Dissection. The central neck dissection (also called paratracheal area, involves the area around your trachea, esophagus, and under the thyroid gland. The lateral neck dissection involves the lymph nodes of the side of the neck. The need for a lateral neck dissection for thyroid cancer must be determined prior to surgery via an expert high resolution ultrasound. This requires excellent equipment and an expert sonographer so that no cancer in the lymph nodes is missed. Lateral neck dissection does NOT involve a large slash along the neck – the incision is in the low collar area and cosmetically very acceptable. You can see testimonials on our website that show you how wonderfully the scar can be hidden The purpose of a thyroid cancer neck dissection is to remove the lymph nodes that contain thyroid cancer and also those that are at risk of having thyroid cancer. Dissection of the central neck is dependent on the surgeon’s observation (during the operation) of the extent of the thyroid cancer. The surgeon should remove any lymph nodes under the thyroid that may be at risk for cancer spread. It is imperative for your surgeon to understand how thyroid cancer behaves to correctly assess the central (paratracheal) area to prevent leaving lymph nodes that already contain thyroid cancer. Ask your surgeon what their thyroid cancer surgery looks like, how often they perform neck dissection, and how often they perform thyroid surgery. Neck dissection for thyroid cancer is very different from the neck dissection for other conditions that ENT doctors frequently do for other head and neck cancers. Make sure your thyroid surgery is done by a thyroid cancer surgery expert.
Просмотров: 1962 Clayman Thyroid Cancer Center
Thyroid Cancer Types, Stages and Treatment Overview
 
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Thyroid Cancer Types, Stages and Treatment Overview Most cancers are treated with removal of the thyroid gland (thyroidectomy), although small tumors that have not spread outside the thyroid gland may be treated by just removing the side of the thyroid containing the tumor (lobectomy). If lymph nodes are enlarged or show signs of cancer spread, they will be removed as well. In addition, recent studies have suggested that patients with micro-papillary carcinomas (very small thyroid cancers) may safely choose to be managed by close observation with ongoing ultrasounds rather than have immediate surgery.
Просмотров: 557 Human Physiology
Johnny's Battle with Stage 4 Thyroid Cancer - Diagnosed with Thyroid Cancer - Cancer Survivor Story
 
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Watch the story of how this thyroid cancer survivor took control of his most prominent fear by sticking to a few trusted methods. Follow this link to see what Dr. David Brownstein has to say about the increasing rates of thyroid cancer: http://bit.ly/ttac-survivor-iodine-article-yt. Johnny worked at a hospital for years so, naturally, it was the first place he went to look for help after finding a lump on his throat. He knew this was a warning side of thyroid cancer. Panicked and scared, Johnny asked the doctors working in his facility to examine him, and that is when they diagnosed him with Stage 4 thyroid cancer. Not knowing what to do, and trusting that his primary physicians knew best, Johnny followed through with the chemotherapy treatment recommended. The particular side effects from his chemotherapy treatment were beyond torturous for Johnny to endure. Johnny knew that this was not the answer for him. He quickly decided to seek other options, but was not sure where to look after the doctors could not suggest any other alternatives. Johnny was always skeptical, and never thought to explore the possibility of natural remedies for cancer. Find out how reading a biblical verse led Johnny to a form of natural treatment that resulted in an improvement of his diagnosis. Since his cancer was downgraded and because of his treatment, Johnny now shares a new perspective on life. Watch more cancer survivor stories, and learn how alternative treatments have helped many with late-stage cancer here: http://bit.ly/cancer-survivor-story-yt. If you like this video, please give it a thumbs up and share it with others you love and care about. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Have you survived a cancer diagnosis and lived to tell about it? We hear so many amazing stories from our readers about how they beat cancer using the very techniques they’ve learned from The Truth About Cancer… and we’d love to hear YOUR story! Sharing these stories brings hope to those who have been diagnosed with or are currently dealing with cancer. So, if you have a personal story to share of your triumph over cancer, please follow this link and tell us all about it: http://bit.ly/your-cancer-survivor-story-yt . Each week we’ll post a new story on our site from the submissions. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Visit our website: http://bit.ly/official-website-ttac-yt Join TTAC's 1 million FB fans: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Facebook-YT Follow us on PINTEREST: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Pinterest-YT Find us on INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Instagram-YT Support our mission by commenting and sharing with your friends and family below. -------------------------------------------------- About The Truth About Cancer -------------------------------------------------- The Truth About Cancer’s mission is to inform, educate, and eradicate the pandemic of cancer in our modern world. Every single day, tens of thousands of people just like you are curing cancer (and/or preventing it) from destroying their bodies. It’s time to take matters into your own hands and educate yourself on real cancer prevention and treatments. It could save your life or the life of someone you love. --------------------------------------- About Ty Bollinger --------------------------------------- Ty Bollinger is a devoted husband, father, a best-selling author, and a Christian. He is also a licensed CPA, health freedom advocate, cancer researcher, former competitive bodybuilder, and author of the best-selling book Cancer - Step Outside the Box, which has sold over 100,000 copies worldwide. After losing his mother and father and several family members to cancer, Ty’s heartbreak and grief coupled with his firm belief that chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery were the NOT the most effective treatments available for cancer patients led him on a path of discovery. He began a quest to learn everything he possibly could about alternative cancer treatments and the medical industry. What he uncovered was shocking. On his journey, he’s interviewed cutting-edge scientists, leading alternative doctors, and groundbreaking researchers to learn about hidden alternative cancer treatments. What he uncovered help to create The Truth About Cancer and its 3 awe-inspiring docu-series: The Quest for The Cures, The Quest For The Cures Continues, and The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest. Ty has touched the hearts and changed the lives of thousands of people around the world. Ty speaks frequently at conferences, local health group meetings, churches, and guest stars on multiple radio and TV shows and writes for numerous magazines and websites. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Просмотров: 3226 The Truth About Cancer
Metastasis of a papillary thyroid cancer. Lymph nodes in the neck - case 9
 
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Complete case history on http://www.thyrosite.com/thyroid/1039/index.htm
Просмотров: 1350 Tamas Solymosi
THYROID CANCER SYMPTOMS
 
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Initially, though, people may go into the doctor because they notice the following symptoms and signs: 1. Lump in the Neck Not all thyroid nodules are big enough to cause a noticeable lump. Some people, though, may notice a lump in the front of their neck. You may be able to see it, or perhaps you can't see it but you can feel it. Other people may notice a lump in your neck when you swallow. The most common way that a thyroid lump (and potential thyroid cancer) is detected, however, is when a doctor performs a thyroid exam and feels your thyroid. 2. Swollen Lymph Node Swollen lymph nodes in the neck are another symptom of thyroid cancer (a symptom not related to thyroid nodules). Thyroid cancer can spread to the lymph nodes, which are scattered throughout your body to help you fight infection. The lymph nodes in your neck (you can feel them under your jaw) become swollen when you have a cold or sore throat. 3. Hoarse Voice Your thyroid gland sits just below the larynx. A thyroid nodule may be pressing on the voice box, causing hoarseness or voice changes. This is an uncommon way that thyroid cancer is detected. 4. Difficulty Swallowing or Breathing The thyroid is on top of your trachea—the windpipe. A developing thyroid cancer may put pressure on your trachea, making breathing more difficult. Your esophagus is below your trachea, so again, a developing thyroid cancer can cause trouble swallowing. 5. Neck Pain Pain is usually a clue that something in your anatomy isn't working quite as it should. If you have neck pain that lasts longer than a few weeks, you should make an appointment with your doctor to figure out what's causing it. 6. Throat Pain Similar to neck pain, if you have throat pain that won't go away, you should go to see your doctor. It's a possible symptom of thyroid cancer. Article Credit: https://www.endocrineweb.com/conditions/thyroid-cancer/thyroid-cancer-symptoms Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkVKbsi4wOka3tK0IWPFKRA/videos
Просмотров: 84950 Disease Fact
Cancer Metastasis in the Bones - All Symptoms
 
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This video of "Cancer Metastasis in the Bones - All Symptoms" will deal extensively with the phenomenon of metastasis that appear in any of the bones of the body, which is one of the sites where the cells of many cancers are going to live in people with advanced cancer. We will see what symptoms the person who has metastasis in one or more of their bones can perceive, regardless of the origin of the same in the form of cancer of any organ of the body. We will learn why these symptoms occur, learning what happens inside the body Do not miss it! Subscríbase to this channel! http://www.youtube.com/user/danielgonzalezMD?sub_confirmation=1
Просмотров: 95350 Daniel González M.D.
How do I know if my thyroid cancer has spread?
 
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Thyroid cancer can reoccur or it can spread to other organs. If you have any concerns, please talk to your physician. Learn more at www.uwhealth.org/endocrine-surgery/thyroid-conditions/51430
Просмотров: 141 UW Health
Surviving Thyroid Cancer: 1 Year Later (Patient Testimonial Update: Erica Ervin)
 
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Erica gave us an update on her thyroidectomy one year after her first interview and two years after the operation. She also offers advice for anyone recently diagnosed with thyroid cancer. See her video from last year here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8q5AKAJcz0&list=UUvrrpNGZ_WUWW4-jtXtbUCA Erica: Obviously I panicked immediately when I first heard the word "cancer." I was definitely very scared. It's always scary when you find out you have cancer or anything serious like that. My name is Erica Ervin and it's been two years since my thyroidectomy. My first surgery, it was just a one-inch scar. I mean, I really have no scars. My surgeries went really well. My first incision was an inch long, kind of in the front and center at the base of my neck. I actually ended up having cancer come back in one of my lymph nodes. Dr. Lee, in my surgery that I had last summer, removed, I believe it was twenty or so lymph nodes on the right side of my neck. And all of them were biopsied and only one contained cancer, so that was good. So for the rest of my life, every morning I have to take a hormone replacement pill. But it's okay, I just take mine in the morning first thing when I wake up with a full glass of water. And then get ready for the day and then I can have breakfast. And then you also have to have fairly regular blood testing because your levels can change throughout the years. So yeah, pretty much since after the first surgery I've felt pretty normal. Or as normal as I can feel. If I was talking to someone who was just diagnosed and found out they had to have surgery, I would definitely tell them it's okay to be afraid. But fortunately I know with thyroid cancer, it's very curable. Especially when caught in the beginning. The surgery is very minimally-invasive. The healing is...I found to be pretty quick. I was worried about scaring, and I'm sure most people are. The scaring was very minimal. Many people who meet me don't even know I've had two surgeries.
Просмотров: 15741 Columbia University Department of Surgery
Lymph Nodes in Thyroid Cancer
 
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Experts from MSKCC say that removing suspicious lymph nodes during thyroid cancer surgery may not affect treatment outcomes for most patients.
Просмотров: 1804 Memorial Sloan Kettering
Thyroid Cancer Spread to Lymph Nodes
 
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Thyroid cancer surgery involves checking the lymph nodes for cancer spread. Watch the best thyroid cancer surgeon operate with near zero blood loss to remove cancerous lymph nodes during surgery for thyroid cancer. In this video, Dr Gary Clayman removes lymph nodes with thyroid cancer in them to cure the thyroid cancer in this patient. See why it is so important for you to have an expert surgeon, because these lymph nodes with cancer in them can be only the size of a pin head and inexperienced surgeons often leave these in the patient and the thyroid cancer returns in a few years. Lean more about thyroid cancer spread to lymph nodes at http://www.thyroidcancer.com/thyroid-cancer-surgery/cancer-lymph-nodes. See the vocal cord nerves and see what lymph nodes look like. If you want to be cured of your thyroid cancer, you must make sure your surgeon checks all of your neck lymph nodes for thyroid cancer spread. You can learn the basics of thyroid cancer here: http://www.thyroidcancer.com
Просмотров: 4108 Clayman Thyroid Cancer Center
Lymph Nodes in Thyroid Cancer -- Sloan-Kettering
 
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Unlike in many other cancers, the spread of thyroid cancer to the lymph nodes has very little impact on survival in most patients, say thyroid cancer experts at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Lymph nodes that look suspicious may be removed during thyroid surgery, but in most cases, this does not affect the outcome of treatment. For more information, please visit http://www.mskcc.org/thyroidcancer
Просмотров: 7500 Memorial Sloan Kettering
Papillary Thyroid Cancer | Symptoms, Treatments, and Prognosis for Papillary Thyroid Cancer
 
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Papillary Thyroid Cancer | Symptoms, Treatments, and Prognosis for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, all about Papillary Thyroid Cancer. VISIT: ►►► http://Papillary-ThyroidCancer.com ◄◄◄ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVM4Vs47IW0 Papillary thyroid cancer (also sometimes called papillary thyroid carcinoma) is the most common type of thyroid cancer. You may have even heard your doctor talk about metastatic papillary thyroid cancer ("metastatic" means that it has spread beyond your thyroid gland). This article will focus on papillary thyroid cancer basics, including papillary thyroid cancer symptoms, treatments, and prognosis Papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most common thyroid cancer. About 80% of all thyroid cancers cases are papillary thyroid cancer.1 What are some papillary thyroid cancer signs and symptoms? Papillary carcinoma typically arises as an irregular, solid or cystic mass that comes from otherwise normal thyroid tissue. This cancer has a high cure rate with 10-year survival rates for all patients with papillary thyroid cancer estimated at 80% to 90%. Cervical metastasis (spread to lymph nodes in the neck) are present in 50% of small papillary carcinomas and in more than 75% of the larger papillary thyroid carcinomas. The presence of lymph node metastasis in these cervical areas causes a higher recurrence rate but not a higher mortality rate. Distant metastasis is uncommon, but lung and bone are the most common sites if the papillary carcinoma does spread. Tumors that invade or extend beyond the thyroid capsule have a much worse prognosis because of a high local recurrence rate. But what do doctors look for to diagnose papillary thyroid cancer? Characteristics of Papillary Thyroid Cancer Peak onset ages are 30 to 50 years old. Papillary thyroid cancer is more common in females than in males by a 3:1 ratio. The prognosis directly related to tumor size. (Less than 1.5 cm [1/2 inch] is a good prognosis.) This cancer accounts for 85% of thyroid cancers due to radiation exposure. In more than 50% of cases, it spreads to lymph nodes of the neck. Distant spread (to lungs or bones) is uncommon. The overall cure rate is very high (near 100% for small lesions in young patients). Although survival following papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is high, a small but significant number of recurrences and deaths occur decades after diagnosis, a long-term study has found. The 3 most commonly cited studies on PTC have median follow-up times of 11, 15, and 15.7 years. In contrast, the new research reports on a median of 27 years of follow-up in a cohort of 269 PTC patients, said Raymon H. Grogan, MD, assistant professor of surgery and director of the endocrine surgery research program at the University of Chicago Medicine, Illinois. He presented the findings this week here at the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons 2013 Annual Meeting. Papillary thyroid cancer (as is the case with follicular thyroid cancer) typically occurs in the middle aged with a peak incidence in the 3rd and 4th decades. It is more common in women with a F:M ratio of 1:1.6 - 3:1 2. Papillary thyroid cancer, which is the most common type of thyroid cancer, makes up about 80% of all cases of thyroid cancer. It is one of the fastest growing cancer types with over 20,000 new cases a year. In fact, it is the 8th most common cancer among women overall and the most common cancer in women younger than 25. Most Patients Survive Papillary Thyroid Cancer Regardless of Treatment According to a study reported on in the May, 2010 issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, papillary thyroid cancer that has not spread outside the thyroid gland has a generally favorable outcome for patients, whether or not they receive treatment within a year of diagnosis. According to the study author, "...nearly every thyroid gland might be found to have a cancer if examined closely enough. The advent of ultrasonography and fine-needle aspiration biopsy has allowed many previously undetected cancers to be identified, changing the epidemiology of the disease. Over the past 30 years, the detected incidence of thyroid cancer has increased three-fold, the entire increase attributable to papillary thyroid cancer and 87% of the increase attributable to tumors measuring less than 2 centimeters." Although survival following papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is high, a small but significant number of recurrences and deaths occur decades after diagnosis, a long-term study has found. "Papillary thyroid cancer in general has a very good prognosis... Also, papillary thyroid cancer rates have been rising steadily for several decades worldwide. The combination of these 2 factors means that more and more people will be living with [the diagnosis] for several decades. This is why we think our study is important," Dr. Grogan told Medscape Medical News. Papillary Thyroid Cancer http://www.youtube.com/PapillaryThyroidCanc . .
Просмотров: 15686 Papillary Thyroid Cancer
Papillary Carcinoma of Thyroid
 
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Easy way to remember papillary carcinoma of thyroid.
Просмотров: 14549 MedRewind
The Good News about Thyroid Cancer
 
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It’s a butterfly-shaped gland found in the center of the neck. While small, the thyroid gland plays an important role in the body. “It’s kind of like a thermostat for the body. It regulates how hot and cold you are, it regulates your metabolism, and it’s very, very common to have cancer in this gland,” said Dr. Anthony Anfuso, an otolaryngologist on the medical staff of Lee Health. Thyroid cancer can affect patients as young as their 20s and is more common in women than men. “Exposure to radiation therapy is a known risk of thyroid cancer, and it can run in families as well. But most often it’s a sporadic finding,” said Dr. Anfuso. There are times when patients develop a lump in their neck, but more often patient’s thyroid will be functioning normally, and they will have no symptoms. The cancer is simply discovered through an imaging procedure like a cat scan or an ultrasound. “The good news about thyroid cancer is survival rate is greater than 98 percent,” he said. Studies have found that in many cases thyroid cancer behaves in a non-aggressive way. “One interesting study did an autopsy on patients who died from a variety of reasons, and a third of them were found to have thyroid cancer that never caused any problems throughout their life,” said Dr. Anfuso. But if patients are diagnosed, doctors say it needs to be treated to prevent future health problems. “A lot of times surgery is all you need, so that’s great. You get the thyroid removed. You have to take medicine, which is thyroid hormone, for the rest of your life. But after that many times you’re cured,” he said. The quick procedure leaves patients with a small scar on their neck but allows them to quickly get back on their feet. View More Health Matters video segments at LeeHealth.org/Healthmatters/ Lee Health in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of health care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For more than 100 years, we’ve been providing our community with personalized preventative health services and primary care to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Lee Health - Caring People. Inspiring Care. Visit LeeHealth.org
Просмотров: 320 Lee Health
10 Need to Know Thyroid Cancer Facts
 
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10 Need to Know Thyroid Cancer Facts 1. Where Does Thyroid Cancer Develop? Thyroid cancer specifically affects the cells in the thyroid, which is an integral part of the body’s endocrine system. The small butterfly-shaped gland, known as the thyroid, is located just below the voice box (or larynx). The thyroid is made up of 2 lobes, which resemble butterfly wings in shape. Each lobe rests on either side of the windpipe and is connected by the isthmus (a thin bridge of tissue). 2. Malignant Thyroid Tumors Malignant thyroid tumors originate in the thyroid cells. There are 2 distinct types of cells in the thyroid—follicular cells and parafollicular cells (or C cells). When a tumor becomes malignant, or when it metastasizes, it means that the cancer can spread from the thyroid cells to other cells and areas of the body. 3. Parafollicular Thyroid Cells Parafollicular cells (or C cells) produce a hormone, known as calcitonin. The body requires calcitonin hormone in order to regulate phosphate and calcium levels in the blood. Research from John Hopkins Medicine, if the thyroid gland is removed, calcium regulation will not suffer since calcitonin is considered a weak hormone with only a small role in calcium regulation. 4. Follicular Thyroid Cells The majority of the thyroid gland is made up of follicular cells. According to research from the John Hopkins Society, the follicular thyroid cells produce hormones needed for every aspect of your metabolism and vital health—such as weight, blood pressure, body temperature, and heart rate. The follicular cells secrete 2 types of iodine-containing thyroid hormones—T4 (or thyroxine) and T3 (or triiodothyronine). The follicular cells rely on sufficient levels of iodine in order to make thyroid hormones. 5. Common Thyroid Cancers According to the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS), papillary thyroid cancer is responsible for roughly 70-percent of all thyroid cancer cases in North America. This occurs with changes to the thyroid cells, which cause malignant tumor development. The CCS indicates that follicular thyroid carcinoma originates in the follicular thyroid cells and makes up the second leading type of thyroid cancer. Rare thyroid cancers include anaplastic thyroid cancer and medullary thyroid carcinoma, or cancer of the C cells. 6. Benign Thyroid Conditions While many more malignant types of thyroid cancer exist (i.e., sarcoma, lymphoma, and squamous cell carcinoma)—many cases of thyroid cell changes cause benign, or non-cancerous thyroid conditions. According to the Mayo Clinic, changes in the thyroid cells, although not cancerous, can still develop into life-altering conditions—such as hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid), hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid). Hyperthyroidism can be caused by several conditions, including Plummer’s disease (toxic goiter), Graves’ disease (autoimmune), and thyroiditis (inflammation). While symptoms of hypothyroidism can vary depending on the level of hormone deficiency, leading to unexplained weight gain, fatigue, chills, thinning hair, and depression. 7. Hodkin’s Vs Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Both Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas begin in the lymphocytes in white blood cells. The difference between these two lymphomas is the presence or absence of an abnormal cell called a Reed-Sternberg cell. If this type of abnormal cell is present, the lymphoma is Hodgkin’s. If it is undetected, the lymphoma would be classified as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which is the more common lymphoma. There are several tests to determine the specific type of lymphoma, but doctors are able to locate an abnormal Reed-Sternberg cell under a microscope. 8. Medullary Thyroid Cancer Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare form of thyroid cancer that accounts for approximately 4% of thyroid cancer cases. MTC develops in the C cells and often spreads before it is discovered in the thyroid. There are two types of MTC – Sporadic and Familial. According to the American Cancer Society, 8 out of 10 cases of MTC are Sporadic MTC. It generally occurs in older adults, affecting one thyroid lobe. The second type of MTC is Familial – which is inherited. This version may occur in childhood as well as early adulthood and may occur in several different areas of the thyroid lobes. 9. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer 10. Parathyroid Cancer
Просмотров: 162 HEALTH AREA
Lung Metastasis - All Symptoms
 
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Suscribe to this channel! http://www.youtube.com/user/doctordanielgonzalezMD?sub_confirmation=1 Lungs are one of the places where cancer cells like to live. There they have oxygen and food. In this video we’ll tackle all the important aspects of lung metastasis. Even if they can kill the person who suffers them. Don’t miss it! Watch this video and learn all the symptoms lung metastasis can cause. Detecting cancer as soon as possible is the best way to beat it!
Просмотров: 16174 Daniel González M.D.
Papillary Thyroid Cancer Treatment
 
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Papillary thyroid cancer is the most common type of thyroid cancer and has an excellent prognosis.
Просмотров: 1723 UW Health
Lymph Node Dissection for Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer
 
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Thomas N. Wang, MD, PhD, discusses where it is necessary to dissect the lymph node for well-differentiated thyroid cancer.
Просмотров: 1095 UAB Medicine
Thyroid Cancers
 
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This is a video on the most common cancers that originate in the thyroid tissue. I created this presentation with Google Slides. Image were created or taken from Wikimedia Commons I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor. ADDITIONAL TAGS: Thyroid cancers The most common carcinomas that originate in the thyroid tissue Epi: Frequency of 80 percent (most common); good prognosis (10 year survival 95%); F:M 3:1; peak incidence in 30s to 50s Gross: irregular contours, no capsule around it Histo: nuclear clearing (nuclei appear empty - “Orphan Annie eye”), nuclear grooves, intranuclear pseudoinclusions, psammoma bodies (calcifications) , reduced colloid, crowded cells, papillary architecture (sometimes present) Derived from follicular cells Increased risk: mutations (RET and BRAF), radiation exposure as child Spread: often by lymphatic invasion to cervical nodes, neck; slow growth Secretes thyroglobulin; takes up radioiodine Treat: lobectomy (maybe total thyroidectomy with lymph node removal) High risk pts get radioiodine tx TSH suppression with thyroid hormone replacement Epi: Frequency of 10 percent; more aggressive than papillary with early metastases; also F:M 3:1; peak in 40s to 60s Histo: monotonous/uniform population, overlapping follicular cells, microacinar formation, reduced colloid, might contain Hurthle cells Derived from follicular cells Increased risk: mutations in RAS Spread: often by vascular invasion; locally invasive, invades thyroid capsule Distal spread more common than papillary Invades blood vessels and invades through the capsule Differentiate from follicular adenoma: Secretes thyroglobulin; takes up radioiodine (except Hurthle cells) Same treatment: lobectomy (maybe total thyroidectomy with lymph node removal) High risk pts get radioiodine tx TSH suppression with thyroid hormone replacement Epi: Frequency of 5%; more aggressive than follicular with early metastases; Sporadic (80%) → F:M 3:2, peak in 40s to 60s Familial (20%) → F:M 1:1, peak onset at early age Histo: neuroendocrine appearance, ‘packets’ of uniform cells; stroma made of amyloid (stains w Congo red) Derived from parafollicular cells (C (clear) cells); produces calcitonin Increased risk: family with MEN 2A and 2B (association), mutation in RET (proto-oncogene) Spread: early metastases Does not secrete thyroglobulin; does not take up radioiodine Same treatment: lobectomy (maybe total thyroidectomy w lymph node removal) Thyroid hormone replacement for normal TSH (no TSH suppression) Anaplastic carcinoma Left of image is amyloid, right of image is near normal thyroid follicles Anaplastic carcinoma AKA undifferentiated carcinoma (because it’s poorly differentiated) Epi: Frequency of 3 percent; very aggressive, poor prognosis, most deadly; M:F 2:1, peak in 60s to 80s Histo: several variants, but all high grade Spread: infiltrative into local structures, soft tissue of neck; widespread metastases, early mortality Does not take up radioiodine Papillary carcinoma Follicular carcinoma Medullary carcinoma Anaplastic carcinoma
Просмотров: 15633 MedLecturesMadeEasy
Thyroidectomy with Lymph Node Involvement- my story
 
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Four days after TT with lymph node dissection. What does it mean?
Просмотров: 969 Shannon Deitz
Advantages of Total Thyroidectomy for Thyroid Cancer
 
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Thyroid Cancer is different in different people. In prior videos, Dr. Clayman discussed advantages and disadvantages of removal of part of the thyroid gland, called partial thyroidectomy or thyroid lobectomy. In this video, Dr. Clayman discusses the advantages of removal of all of the thyroid gland in thyroid cancer surgery. For the most common thyroid cancers, surgery of the thyroid which removes all of the thyroid gland called total thyroidectomy provides the ability to treat thyroid cancer with radioactive iodine and the ability to watch the blood of thyroid cancer patients for the most common blood markers for thyroid cancer, called thyroglobulin (for papillary, follicular and hurthle cell cancers) and calcitonin and CEA (for medullary thyroid cancer). Total thyroidectomy may be the best surgery for thyroid tumors or thyroid cancers if there are abnormalities in both sides (lobes) of the thyroid gland or if you have a thyroid cancer that has spread to lymph nodes in the neck or the thyroid cancer has broken out of the capsule (or covering) of the thyroid gland. In this video, Dr. Clayman will discuss that total thyroidectomy may be the preferred thyroid surgery for thyroid cancers which have spread to neck lymph nodes, grown outside of the thyroid, or have spread elsewhere in the body as well as when thyroid cancers involve both sides of the thyroid gland and no significant normal thyroid tissue could or should be left in the neck.
Просмотров: 1959 Clayman Thyroid Cancer Center
Thyroid Cancer within Lymph Nodes
 
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Learn more at http://www.thyroidcancer.com/
Просмотров: 676 Clayman Thyroid Cancer Center
Neck Dissection Surgery, Possible Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma
 
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A quick run down of what's been going on with me lately. Having surgery March 8th for a cyst in my neck, and it may be caused by Thyroid Cancer (Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma with Metastasis into lymph nodes). Here is my first ever video on my channel that is not car related. I plan to have some more as I heal up and recover from surgery. I plan to blog a lot more than make videos so, please, head over to www.joltdudeuc.blogspot.com for more detailed information and more frequent updates. Thanks!
Просмотров: 729 Gaganpreet Bains
How Does Cancer Spread To Lymph Nodes?
 
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http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/Lymplex.html http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/Lymplex-ingredients.html Cancer can spread from where it started (the primary site) to other parts of the body. When cancer cells break away from a tumor, they can travel to other areas of the body through either the bloodstream or the lymph system. Cancer cells can travel through the bloodstream to reach distant organs. If they travel through the lymph system, the cancer cells may end up in lymph nodes. Either way, most of the escaped cancer cells die or are killed before they can start growing somewhere else. But one or two might settle in a new area, begin to grow, and form new tumors. This spread of cancer to a new part of the body is called metastasis. In order for cancer cells to spread to new parts of the body, they have to go through several changes. They first have to become able to break away from the original tumor and then attach to the outside wall of a lymph vessel or blood vessel. Then they must move through the vessel wall to flow with the blood or lymph to a new organ or lymph node. When cancer grows inside lymph nodes, it usually affects the lymph nodes near the tumor itself. These nodes are the ones that have been doing most of the work to filter out or kill the cancer cells. http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/store http://www.balancedhealthtoday.com/store/lymplex.html
Просмотров: 6728 Martina Santiago
Living With Thyroid Cancer: When Radioactive Iodine Fails
 
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When people stop responding to radioactive iodine, they are what is called refractory. Treatment after this point is aggressive and there is often a period of watchful waiting before the next step in treatment. These thyroid cancer patients need new treatment solutions. Right now there are two angiogenic agents called Nexavar and Lenvima. They increase the time it takes for metastatic thyroid cancer to grow. These agents and many clinical trials on the horizon, kinase inhibitors and immunotherapy. There is finally hope for these patients.
Просмотров: 2685 Vital Options International
TOTAL THYROIDECTOMY RECOVERY - Papillary Thyroid Cancer | ThyroidlessLex
 
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Watch my last Thyroid Thursday video ➡️ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1nZ9vPIPEA Please remember to LIKE & SUBSCRIBE, if you haven't already! ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ What you should take from this video: a) I have no pain tolerance b) TAKE THE PAIN MEDICINE. Thanks so much for watching! If you have any more questions regarding my total thyroidectomy or my recovery, leave a post down below! See you back here on Saturday! Have a great weekend 💕 Contact Me: Instagram: @ThyroidlessLex Twitter: @ThyroidlessLex Inquiries: ThyroidlessLex@gmail.com Hi, I’m Alex from ThyroidlessLex. Thanks for popping on over to my channel! I post videos every Thursday and Saturday ranging from living and dealing with thyroid cancer, recipe videos (including the “low iodine” diet!), make up, hauls and the general life of a ~20 something year old. If you’re currently diagnosed with thyroid cancer, a survivor, or just someone interested in my chatty videos – be sure to hit SUBSCRIBE and LIKE! Thanks for stopping by, I hope you enjoy my content.
Просмотров: 2250 Thyroidless Lex
Thyroid Cancer: Surgery for Residual or Recurrent Lymph Node Metastases. Dr. McIntyre.
 
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The Surgical Approach to the Patient With Residual or Recurrent Lymph Node Metastases Robert C. McIntyre, Jr., M.D., Surgeon
THYROID CANCER TREATMENT
 
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Treatment for thyroid cancer depends on the type of thyroid cancer you have and how far it has spread. The main treatments are: 1. thyroidectomy a thyroidectomy– surgery to remove part or all of the thyroid 2. radioactive iodine treatment you swallow a radioactive substance that travels through your blood and kills the cancer cells 3. external radiotherapy external radiotherapy – a machine is used to direct beams of radiation at the cancer cells to kill them 4. chemotherapy and targeted therapies chemotherapy and targeted therapies – medications used to kill cancer cells Your treatment plan You'll be cared for throughout your treatment by a team of healthcare professionals. Your team will recommend what they feel is the best treatment for you. This will largely depend on the type of thyroid cancer you have. For example:  papillary carcinoma and follicular carcinoma can usually be treated with surgery followed by radioactive iodine treatment  medullary thyroid carcinoma is usually treated with surgery to remove the thyroid, often followed by radiotherapy  anaplastic thyroid carcinoma can't usually be treated with surgery, but radiotherapy and chemotherapy can help control the symptoms Article Credit: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Cancer-of-the-thyroid/Pages/Treatment.aspx Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkVKbsi4wOka3tK0IWPFKRA/videos
Просмотров: 270 Disease Fact
Papillary Thyroid Cancer | My Story, Part 5: Radioactive Iodine Ablation and Isolation
 
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Papillary Thyroid Cancer | My Story, Part 5: Radioactive Iodine Ablation and Isolation
Просмотров: 2564 Amanda Kleen
Treatment of Recurrent Thyroid Cancer
 
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Robert I. Haddad, MD, discusses strategies for managing recurrent metastatic thyroid cancer.
Просмотров: 2377 OncLiveTV
Thyroid cancer : : Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, Treatment, Prognosis
 
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Please *LIKE || COMMENT | | SHARE | | SUBSCRIBE* to support this channel. For more info visit http://www.DiseasesAndTreatment.com/ ====================================== Thyroid cancer : What is the thyroid gland? https://youtu.be/qrjeV3vI02o Thyroid cancer : What is thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/yPO74xBgD54 Thyroid cancer : What causes thyroid cancer? Risk factors? https://youtu.be/m9qaZsL9hsI Thyroid cancer : What are the symptoms and signs of thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/QNuEHOwf_YA Thyroid cancer : What are the different types of thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/Nc35fbnGHfI Thyroid cancer : How do doctors diagnose thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/8-U9qBPrPHw Thyroid cancer : How is thyroid cancer staging determined? https://youtu.be/UE3dZwpeEt0 Thyroid cancer : What is the medical treatment for thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/OzZDxbJEa34 Thyroid cancer : What is the prognosis and survival rate for patients with thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/oRXBbYr2va4 Thyroid cancer : Is it possible to prevent thyroid cancer? https://youtu.be/JucRLgGbkZk ====================================== The thyroid gland produces thyroid hormones which are important in the normal regulation of the metabolism of the body. Thyroid cancer is three times more common in women than in men. There are four major types of thyroid cancer: papillary, follicular, medullary (MTC), and anaplastic. The cause of thyroid cancer is unknown, but certain risk factors have been identified and include a family history of goiter, exposure to high levels of radiation, and certain hereditary syndromes. The National Cancer Institute recommends that anyone who received radiation to the head or neck in childhood be examined by a doctor every one to two years to detect potential thyroid cancer. The most common signs and symptoms of thyroid cancer include a lump, or thyroid nodule, that can be felt in the neck, trouble swallowing, throat or neck pain, swollen lymph nodes in the neck, cough, and vocal changes. If a lump in the thyroid is found, the only certain way to tell whether it is cancerous is by needle or surgery biopsy and examining the thyroid tissue obtained. A CEA blood test, physical exam, X-rays, CT scans, PET scans, ultrasounds, and MRIs may also be used to help establish a definitive diagnosis and determine staging. Surgery is the most common form of treatment for thyroid cancer that has not spread to other areas of the body. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and radioactive iodine treatment are also medical treatment options in addition to surgery. The survival rate and prognosis of thyroid cancer depends upon a few factors, including the individual's age, the size of the tumor, and whether there is metastasis or spread of the tumor. It is not possible to prevent most cases of thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer is the third most common solid cancer tumor in children and the most common endocrine malignancy.
Просмотров: 27 Dr. Warraich Health Channel