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Hormonal Therapy for Breast Cancer: We Teach You
 
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We teach you about hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Drugs such as tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors are key treatment options for most breast cancers. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ________________________________ Questions for your Medical Oncologist: 1. What type of hormonal therapy do you recommend? 2. Will I also benefit from chemotherapy? 3. What are the side effects of hormonal therapy? 4. Will I need 5 or 10 years of these medications? 5. Would the genomic assay Oncotype DX be helpful? 6. What is Hormonal Therapy? Anti-estrogen (estrogen-blocking) medications, prescribed as pills, are incredibly effective at treating certain types of breast cancer. Hormonal therapy is given to about 70 to 80% of women with breast cancer. Chemotherapy, on the other hand, is a more intense cancer treatment that is generally administered intravenously. Most patients will not need chemotherapy. Many women that do need chemotherapy will also benefit from hormonal therapy. These treatment decisions are complex ones with your medical oncologist. You will make better choices when you are well informed before meeting with your medical oncologist. Do my “Receptors” suggest Hormonal Therapy? When the estrogen circulating in your blood stream interacts with a breast cancer that has “Estrogen Receptors” (ER) present on its surface, it tends to flip the ER switch to the “on” or “grow” position for ER Positive tumors. The same can be said to a lesser extent for the “Progesterone Receptor,” if your cancer is found to also be PR positive. Patients with ER+ breast cancers almost always benefit from the anti-estrogen effects of hormonal therapy. These medications can make cancer cells die, or slow down their growth. If a few cancer cells have already spread to other parts of the body, these medications are incredibly effective at preventing these cells from growing and threatening your life in the future. In other words, those who take hormonal therapy for ER+ tumors have a more successful chance at long-term survival when compared to those who do not. About 80% of all breast cancers are ER+. Even if your medical oncologist recommends chemotherapy for you, if your tumor is ER+ you will also benefit from up to 10 years of hormonal therapy after chemotherapy. Hormonal therapy is never given during chemotherapy nor during radiation therapy. What is “Tamoxifen?” Tamoxifen is an anti-estrogen medication (pills) that has been used with great success with ER+ cancers for three decades. It is now the primary hormonal therapy for younger, pre-menopausal women. It is also the primary drug for men with breast cancer. It is used for some post-menopausal women. What are “Aromatase Inhibitors?” Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are a class of anti-estrogen medications (pills) that have proven to be slightly more effective than Tamoxifen for post-menopausal women. It is not recommended for younger, pre-menopausal women, except in certain circumstances. The three most common versions are Anastrozole (Arimidex), Letrozole (Femara), and Exemestane (Aromasin). What are the side effects of Hormonal Therapy? Side effects vary greatly from one person to the next for both types of hormonal medications. Some have no symptoms at all. Most have very tolerable side effects. Some patients will need to change hormonal therapy medications to find the best balance of cancer benefit versus side effects. Several side effects that are rather common for both tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors are hot flashes, night sweats, joint pain, and vaginal dryness. Below, we list some of the other specific side effects for both drugs. Tamoxifen Side Effects: Increased risk of uterine (endometrial) cancer Increased risk of developing blood clots Slows normal bone loss in most women (a “good” side effect) Cannot be taken during pregnancy because of risk of birth defects or fetal death Can temporarily induce menopause in pre-menopausal women. Aromatase Inhibitor Side Effects: Can worsen bone loss (osteoporosis) in women Muscle and joint aches and pains Would an “Oncotype DX” assay help me? Patients who have a small, estrogen receptor positive, HER2 receptor negative tumor, and no evidence of cancer in their lymph nodes may benefit from an Oncotype DX genomic assay. This cutting-edge test looks deeper into your cancer cells to better identify people who may also benefit from chemotherapy with ER+ breast cancers. The decision to undergo chemotherapy, in addition to hormonal therapy, is a complicated one. Your medical oncologist uses many factors to help decide if you will benefit from chemotherapy. An Oncotype DX analysis of a portion of your breast cancer tissue can be instrumental in this decision.
Просмотров: 3773 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer
 
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Breastlink founder Dr. Link, author of “The Breast Cancer Survival Manual,” explains why drugs like Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors reduce a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer. When researches began sequencing cancer genes in 2003 and 2004, they discovered that cancer wasn’t a homogenous disease. There were variations and they eventually divided cancer into subtypes: triple negative (15% of breast cancer), HER2 amplified type (12-15% of breast cancer), and hormone receptor positive, also known as the luminal cancer (over 70% of breast cancer). Luminal cancer cells have estrogen and progesterone receptors on their surface and have to receive these hormones in order to survive. To prevent these tumors from getting estrogen, doctors prescribe Tamoxifen, which blocks the estrogen receptors and kills the cell. After a woman goes into menopause and her ovaries stop producing estrogen, the tumor can still receive estrogen from the adrenal gland. Aromatase inhibitors are used to block adrenal estrogen. For more information about Breastlink and breast cancer, visit our website: www.breastlink.com
Просмотров: 4450 Breastlink
Hormonal therapy in breast cancer
 
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This video describes therapy with anti-estrogens medications in breast cancer.
Просмотров: 24783 charlottecancer
How to Block Breast Cancer's Estrogen-Producing Enzymes
 
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What happens to hormone levels in women (and men) randomized to drink soymilk? Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at http://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free excerpt from his latest NYT Bestseller HOW NOT TO DIE. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from the sales of his books, DVDs, and speaking engagements go to support the 501c3 nonprofit that runs NutritionFacts.org.) Wait, soy protects against breast cancer? Yes, in study after study after study. Even in women at high risk? See BRCA Breast Cancer Genes and Soy (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/brca-breast-cancer-genes-and-soy/). Even if you already have breast cancer? See Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Is-Soy-Healthy-for-Breast-Cancer-Survivors). Even GMO soy? See GMO Soy and Breast Cancer (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/gmo-soy-and-breast-cancer/). OK, then Who Shouldn’t Eat Soy? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/who-shouldnt-eat-soy). Watch that video too! :) What else can we do to decrease breast cancer risk? See: • Broccoli vs. Breast Cancer Stem Cells (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/broccoli-versus-breast-cancer-stem-cells/) • Flaxseeds & Breast Cancer Prevention (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/flaxseeds-breast-cancer-prevention/) • Breast Cancer vs. Mushrooms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-vs-mushrooms/) • Preventing Breast Cancer by Any Greens Necessary (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/preventing-breast-cancer-by-any-greens-necessary/) • Tree Nuts or Peanuts for Breast Cancer Prevention? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/tree-nuts-or-peanuts-for-breast-cancer-prevention/) • Estrogenic Cooked Meat Carcinogens (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/estrogenic-cooked-meat-carcinogens/) • Fiber vs. Breast Cancer (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/fiber-vs-breast-cancer/) • Breast Cancer and Alcohol: How Much Is Safe? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-and-alcohol-what-much-is-safe/) • Breast Cancer Risk: Red Wine v. White Wine (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-risk-red-wine-vs-white-wine/) • Cholesterol Feeds Breast Cancer Cells (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Cholesterol-Feeds-Breast-Cancer-Cells) • Which Dietary Factors Affect Breast Cancer Most? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Which-Dietary-Factors-Affect-Breast-Cancer-Most) • Industry Response to Bovine Leukemia Virus in Breast Cancer (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/industry-response-to-bovine-leukemia-virus-in-breast-cancer) • The Role of Bovine Leukemia in Breast Cancer (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-role-of-bovine-leukemia-virus-in-breast-cancer) Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-block-breast-cancers-estrogen-producing-enzymes and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-block-breast-cancers-estrogen-producing-enzymes. You’ll also find a transcript of the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast: http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Просмотров: 52239 NutritionFacts.org
Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer. ER+. What is it?
 
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ER positive breast cancer means that the cancer cells grow and reproduce fast in response to the hormone estrogen. The diagnosis is based on the results of Immunohistochemistry assay. Assay is used to show whether or not the cancer cells have hormone receptors on their surface. Why is it important? When Estrogen gets attached to the receptor, it’s a signal to our DNA: start to grow and reproduce. (1)The more receptors cancer calls have, the stronger the signal. (2)The more Estrogen there is in the blood stream, the stronger the signal to the DNA. Hormone receptor status is important because oncologist will decide whether the cancer is likely to respond to hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy includes medications that (1) block estrogen receptor, so Estrogen cannot sit there and send the signal to the DNA: grow and reproduce or (2) lower the amount of estrogen in the body. As a Naturopathic Physician I make sure that my patients do not consume estrogen-like substances. My specialty is: reduction of all types of cancer. Food, water and cosmetics, all should be free of chemicals Stay healthy Dr. V Waks
Просмотров: 3905 Doctor Veronica
Treatment of ER+ Breast Cancer
 
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SERM = SELECTIVE estrogen receptor modulator, not "SPECIFIC" estrogen receptor modulator, which is what i said in this video. Sorry for the confusion!
Просмотров: 916 YT Productions
Breast Cancer Receptors: Learn What You Need to Know
 
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We teach you to about breast cancer tumor receptors and why they are important in your breast cancer treatment. Chemotherapy and hormonal therapy are based on your receptor pattern. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: 1. What receptors do my tumor have? 2. What type of treatment do they suggest I will need? 3. May I have a copy of all my pathology reports? 4. Do my receptors already suggest I need chemotherapy? 5. Do my receptors show I will need hormonal therapy? 6. Would I benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy? What are Breast Cancer Receptors? Once a breast biopsy is determined to be an invasive by a pathologist under the microscope, they will automatically run at least three more tests on the same tissue to determine what “receptors” are present. Receptors are tiny proteins on the surface of the cells that act like “light switches” that can turn cancer cell growth “on” or “off.” The Estrogen receptor (ER), Progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 receptor results are incredibly important for you to know and understand. Receptors are different than “grade” and “stage” as outlined in the diagram below. All are different pieces of the breast cancer puzzle that your physicians will assemble to determine the best therapy for you. In the case of receptors, these are key determinants as to whether you will or will not benefit from hormonal therapy (pills) or chemotherapy. The receptors involving a precancerous lesion such as DCIS have different implications and are addressed in our DCIS course. Receptors that suggest Hormonal Therapy Estrogen Receptor Positive (ER+) tumors are always treated with hormonal therapy. Usually these types of medications (pills) are taken for a total of 5 to 10 years. It is still possible that one may need chemotherapy in addition to hormonal therapy. If you are Progesterone Receptor Positive (PR+) then you will likely need hormonal therapy, even if you are ER-. The Estrogen Receptor plays a much more important role in cancer care than the Progesterone Receptor. Receptors that suggest Chemotherapy Determining if you need chemotherapy is a very complex decision process and is primarily driven by your medical oncologist. Your “receptor pattern” is a key piece of information that is known early in your breast cancer journey. In about 30% of patients with an invasive breast cancer, the receptor pattern alone can strongly suggest that chemotherapy will be needed, regardless of what is found at surgery. We list a few of the more common “chemotherapy receptor patterns” below. Many factors, including a large cancer and cancer that is present in the lymph nodes, also point someone towards chemotherapy. Take our video lesson on “Will I Need Chemotherapy“ (here). Often if someone needs chemotherapy, they will likely benefit also from hormonal therapy after chemotherapy if their estrogen receptor is positive. Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-) tumors do not respond to anti-estrogen oral medications that are essential for treating estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. Quite simply, patients with ER negative tumors will benefit from chemotherapy if they are healthy enough to tolerate it. ER negative tumors are more aggressive cancers, but respond very well to chemotherapy. This includes “triple negative” breast cancers. Progesterone Receptors (PR) play a much smaller role than estrogen or HER2 receptors and are not addressed here. HER2 Receptor Positive (HER2+) tumors are very responsive to chemotherapy when paired with new breakthrough drugs that target these tumors, such as Herceptin and Perjeta. The same holds true if a HER2-positive tumor is also ER positive. Take our “HER2-Positive“ video lesson to learn more (here). HER2-positive tumors are more aggressive cancers, but we now can treat them more effectively with chemotherapy and “targeted immunotherapy” drugs that are designed to destroy HER2-positive cancers. “Triple Negative” (ER-)(PR-)(HER2-) tumors are also fast growing tumors that are usually treated with a specific chemotherapy regimen. These tumors are not responsive to hormonal therapy at all, but are sensitive to chemotherapy. If you have “Triple Negative Breast Cancer“ review our video lesson (here). Take home message: Make sure to ask for a copy of the pathology report from your biopsy. Ask your breast surgeon and medical oncologist to explain to you what your receptors mean regarding your treatment. Sometimes the HER2 receptor results can take up to two weeks to become finalized. Inquire early on with your physicians about your benefit from hormonal therapy and/or chemotherapy.
Просмотров: 1245 Breast Cancer School for Patients
HER2 Positive Breast Cancer: Everything You Must Know
 
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We teach you why HER2-positive breast cancers are more threatening and educate you about new therapies such as targeted immunotherapy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _____________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: 1. What is HER2-Positive breast cancer? 2. Will I need Chemo and Targeted Therapy? 3. What are the benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo? 4. Isn’t Neoadjuvant Chemo recommended more now? 5. Should I consider a Clinical Trial? 6. What is “HER2-Positive” breast cancer? “HER2-Positive” breast cancers are fast growing tumors that more frequently spread beyond the breast to other parts of the body. Because of this, they are a bigger threat to your life than most other types of cancers with different receptor patterns. These cancers are called “HER2-positive” because they have too many HER2 protein receptors on their surface. These tiny proteins act like “light switches” to turn cancer cell growth “on.” Chemotherapy, combined with new, “targeted” drugs, are very effective against HER2-positive breast cancer and are a leap forward in breast cancer care. Your Breast Surgeon will know your “receptor pattern” within days after your initial breast biopsy. These results are often not communicated to you early on in your decision process. Although only 20% of breast cancers are “HER2-positive,” it is imperative that you specifically ask your surgeon immediately, and well before surgery, “What are my receptor results?” Take our lesson on “My Tumor Receptors” to learn more. Treated with Chemo and “Targeted Therapy” HER2 Receptor Positive (HER2+) tumors are incredibly responsive to chemotherapy when paired with new breakthrough drugs that target these cancers, such as Herceptin and Perjeta. The same holds true if a HER2+ tumor is also Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+). HER2+ tumors are more aggressive cancers, but we now can treat them more effectively, than in the past, with chemotherapy and “targeted immunotherapy” drugs that are designed to destroy them. Everyone with a HER2+ tumor larger than 5mm (1/4 inch) and in good health is considered for chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Unfortunately, studies have shown that many patients are not offered these standard of care, life-saving “targeted drugs” along with chemotherapy. You will make better treatment choices when you are well informed about HER2 therapies before meeting with your medical oncologist. You must inquire about Herceptin, Perjeta, and other “anti-HER2 drugs” that may be of benefit to you. Ask about the benefits of “Neoadjuvant Chemo” What is often overlooked are the benefits of offering neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with HER2-Positive, “Early-Stage” (1 & 2) breast cancers. There are distinct advantages (listed below) to having chemotherapy before surgery instead of afterwards. The decision to consider neoadjuvant chemotherapy always begins with your breast surgeon. Breast surgeons choose the initial direction of your entire breast cancer treatment plan. You must address this “cutting edge” treatment option well before surgery to benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Do not be afraid to ask. This is a very important question. Learn more about “Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy“ by taking our video lesson on the topic. The Potential Benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo: *Begin life-saving chemotherapy earlier *Reduce the need for a mastectomy *Improve lumpectomy cosmetic outcomes *Reduce the need for an “Axillary Dissection” *Allows more time for BRCA genetic testing *More time to think about “lumpectomy vs. mastectomy” *Shows your cancer team if the chemo is working *Can possibly eliminate all cancer cells before surgery *Reduces the need for radiation after a mastectomy Ask if you might benefit from a Clinical Trial. New therapies must be studied in clinical trials to make sure they are safe and effective at treating breast cancer. HER2-positive breast cancers are currently the focus of intense clinical research. New drug treatments are rapidly being developed for this aggressive cancer. Less than 5% of all patients with breast cancer participate in clinical trials. Patients with cancer willing to participate in clinical trials are essential for the advancement of breast cancer care. Ask your medical oncologist if they offer or recommend you participate in a clinical trial for your unique breast cancer situation. Learn more about “Clinicial Trials“ at the Breast Cancer School for Patients.
Просмотров: 10412 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Hormone Positive (ER+/PR) MBC - Dr. Katie Reeder Hayes - 2014 MBCN Conference at UNC
 
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Current diagnosis, treatment and management of Hormone sensitive metastatic breast cancer also called ER+/PR+ or ER+/PR- disease.
Просмотров: 1413 Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN)
Hormone Receptor-Positive and HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: A Medical Update
 
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Featuring Sara Hurvitz, MD, FACP, learn about the use of targeted therapies for early-stage, hormone receptor-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer, explore how these medicines reduce risk of recurrence and how they may be used before and after surgery.
Просмотров: 13180 Living Beyond Breast Cancer
The Safest Estrogen Foods for Reducing Breast Cancer Risk - Dr. Veronique
 
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To discover what surprising foods lower your breast cancer risk, watch this video now. In this interview, Dr. Veronique Desaulniers reveals the truth about soy and breast cancer. And destroys the myths about the safest estrogen foods. You’ll learn the three ways this all-natural food works at reducing breast cancer risk. Also, how eating just 5 teaspoons a day of this type of seed lowered cancer markers in patients diagnosed with breast cancer by up to 71%. Find out the 4 things you need to look for in the safest estrogen foods. Hear about the thousand year old history of one healing food that’s still used today to lower breast cancer risk. And the reason why GMOs are so dangerous. To learn more ways to prevent, treat and beat cancer, you can watch Episode 1 & 2 of A Global Quest NOW for FREE by following this link: http://bit.ly/free-AQG-episodes-YT . To watch Episode 1 & 2 of A Global Quest docu-series for FREE, click here: http://bit.ly/a-global-quest-free-yt Visit our website: http://bit.ly/official-website-ttac-yt Join TTAC's 1 million FB fans: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Facebook-YT Follow us on PINTEREST: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Pinterest-YT Find us on INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Instagram-YT Support our mission by commenting and sharing with your friends and family below. -------------------------------------------------- About The Truth About Cancer -------------------------------------------------- The Truth About Cancer’s mission is to inform, educate, and eradicate the pandemic of cancer in our modern world. Every single day, tens of thousands of people just like you are curing cancer (and/or preventing it) from destroying their bodies. It’s time to take matters into your own hands and educate yourself on real cancer prevention and treatments. It could save your life or the life of someone you love. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Inside The Truth About Cancer Docu-series --------------------------------------------------------------------- Doctors, researchers, experts, and survivors show you exactly how to prevent and treat cancer in our 3 original docu-series: The Quest for The Cures, The Quest For The Cures Continues, and The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest. In our docu-series you’ll travel with Ty Bollinger who lost both his mother and father to cancer (as well as 5 other family members). Ty travels the country and the globe and sits down with the foremost doctors, researchers, experts, and cancer conquerors to find out their proven methods for preventing and treating cancer. You can watch Episode 1 & 2 NOW for FREE by following this link: http://bit.ly/a-global-quest-free-yt Please join our email list to be notified of all upcoming events (including free airings of our docu-series): http://bit.ly/join-the-mission-ttac Learn more about our latest docu-series The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest here: http://bit.ly/agq-silver-ttac-yt --------------------------------------- About Ty Bollinger --------------------------------------- Ty Bollinger is a devoted husband, father, a best-selling author, and a Christian. He is also a licensed CPA, health freedom advocate, cancer researcher, former competitive bodybuilder, and author of the best-selling book Cancer - Step Outside the Box, which has sold over 100,000 copies worldwide. After losing his mother and father and several family members to cancer, Ty’s heartbreak and grief coupled with his firm belief that chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery were the NOT the most effective treatments available for cancer patients led him on a path of discovery. He began a quest to learn everything he possibly could about alternative cancer treatments and the medical industry. What he uncovered was shocking. On his journey, he’s interviewed cutting-edge scientists, leading alternative doctors, and groundbreaking researchers to learn about hidden alternative cancer treatments. What he uncovered help to create The Truth About Cancer and its 3 awe-inspiring docu-series: The Quest for The Cures, The Quest For The Cures Continues, and The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest. Ty has touched the hearts and changed the lives of thousands of people around the world. Ty speaks frequently at conferences, local health group meetings, churches, and guest stars on multiple radio and TV shows and writes for numerous magazines and websites. -----------------------------------
Просмотров: 6968 The Truth About Cancer
Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy for Estrogen Receptor Positive Early Stage Breast Cancer
 
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This video clip will review hormonal therapy options for both pre- and post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor positive, early stage breast cancer. The risks and benefits of Tamoxifen and the Aromatase Inhibitors (anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane) are discussed.
Просмотров: 3809 Mayo Clinic
Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer
 
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All breast tumors are tested to see if they are hormone sensitive. Those tumors that are hormone sensitive will typically respond to anti-estrogen treatments. In this video, you will learn about hormone-sensitive breast cancer.
Просмотров: 2345 Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation
Understanding the Basics of Hormone Therapy
 
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Find out more about Breast Cancer Index (BCI): http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/breastcancerindex/ Many women use Anti-Hormone Therapy as a breast cancer treatment but few understand the basics of how it works. Find out as we explain how Hormone Therapy works in simpler terms. To learn more about BCI, go to http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/breastcancerindex/ SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING BREAST CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/user/drjayharness VISIT BREASTCANCERANSWERS.com FOR THE LATEST IN BREAKING BREAST CANCER NEWS http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/news SUBMIT A QUESTION http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ DOWNLOAD DR. HARNESS' 15 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ CONNECT WITH US! Google+: http://bit.ly/16nhEnr Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BreastCancerAnswers Twitter: https://twitter.com/BreastCancerDr
Просмотров: 4506 Breast Cancer Answers®
Study shows new drug combination may benefit women with ER/PR-positive breast cancer
 
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A new study led by Dr. Ian Krop, Medical Oncologist at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber shows new drug combination may benefit women with advanced ER/PR-positive breast cancer. Krop's research is being presented at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Click here to learn more about Dana-Farber's participation at San Antonio: http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Susan-F--Smith-Center-for-Women-s-Cancers/San-Antonio-Breast-Cancer-Symposium.aspx
Просмотров: 577 Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Genomic Testing in Breast Cancer: What You Must Know
 
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We teach you about genomic testing and how these sophisticated tests can guide you to personalized therapies for your breast cancer. THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BreastCancerSchoolForPatients/ ________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: *Do I qualify for an Oncotype DX genomic test? *If so, will you order genomic testing for me? *Would you order a genomic test before I see a medical oncologist? *Are there any other genomic tests that apply to me? *What is a genomic assay? These sophisticated tests are performed on a small sample of cancer tissue in appropriate patients with early stage breast cancer. Genomic tests are usually ordered after surgery when the pathology report is finalized. It measures unique aspects of the tumor to determine if a patient will benefit from chemotherapy in addition to hormonal therapy. Such “genomic assays” developed over the last decade are a dramatic advance in breast cancer care. The Oncotype DX assay by Genomic Health Inc. is the most utilized genomic assay of those available in the United States. Who should consider a genomic test? Patients who have small “Estrogen receptor positive” (ER+) and “HER2 receptor negative” (HER2-) tumors and no evidence of cancer in their lymph nodes may benefit from an Oncotype DX assay. The purpose of this test is to better identify people who do and do not benefit from chemotherapy. The decision to undergo chemotherapy is a complicated one. Your medical oncologist will examine multiple factors to help determine if you will benefit from chemotherapy. The NCCN Guidelines, listed in the website links below, outline in much greater detail recommendations for the use of genomic tests. An Oncotype DX test can be instrumental in this decision for many patients. You may qualify for a Genomic Assay if… You have early stage cancer (Stage I or II) Your tumor is Estrogen receptor positive (ER+) Your tumor is Her2 receptor negative (HER2-) No cancer was found in your lymph nodes You are willing to consider having chemotherapy You are healthy enough to undergo chemotherapy How is chemotherapy tailored to patients? Genomic breast cancer tests are a leap forward in our ability to “look inside” breast cancer cells. Sophisticated breast cancer care is based upon the principle of providing maximal benefit from the least toxic therapy. Newly diagnosed breast cancer patients deserve the best information available to decide whether they need chemotherapy. Take our video lesson on “Will I Need Chemotherapy?“ (here) to understand the general concepts. Genomics is a promising and rapidly developing field. OTHER GENOMIC TESTS: Oncotype DX Breast DCIS Test This assay of DCIS or “precancerous” breast cells may help identify some women who may not benefit from radiation therapy after a lumpectomy. Genomic Health Inc. is a leading personalized medicine company. More information is about this test is located (here). MammaPrint This genomic test is used for Stage I and II breast cancers to determine prognosis and survival. This test is now included in national guidelines for some with hormone sensitive breast cancers that are found to have a small amount of cancer in a few lymph nodes. It is also a genomic test for some without “node positive” breast cancer. Agendia is a leader in personalized and molecular cancer diagnostics. More information about MammaPrint is located (here). Endopredict EndoPredict is a 2nd generation genomic breast cancer recurrence test to assess for 10-year risk of cancer recurrence. This test also accounts for tumor size in helping determine if chemotherapy may be needed in early stage, favorable breast cancers. Myriad Genetics is global leader in genetic testing and personalized medicine. More information about Endopredict is located (here). Breast Cancer Index (BCI) This test is designed for women with favorable, early stage breast cancer who have been on hormonal therapy for 4 to 5 years. It can help determine if someone will benefit (or can avoid) five additional years of hormonal therapy, such as tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor. This test is not yet approved by the FDA. Medicare and some insurance companies may cover the cost. Biotheranostics is a molecular diagnostics company. More information about BCI is located (here). Take Home Message: Make sure to ask both your breast surgeon and medical oncologist if a genomic assay might play a role in your treatment decisions. For appropriate patients, these tests should be considered only one piece of the many “pieces of the puzzle” in deciding treatment decisions about chemotherapy and hormonal therapy.
Просмотров: 970 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Will I need Chemotherapy for My Breast Cancer?
 
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We teach you how your tumor receptors, lymph nodes, genomic assays, and breast cancer stage indicates if you would benefit from chemotherapy. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ____________________________________ Questions for your Medical Oncologist and Breast Surgeon: 1. Would I benefit from chemotherapy? 2. What factors suggest I will benefit from chemotherapy? 3. What is the risk to my life if I do not undergo chemotherapy? 4. What are the advantages of “Neoadjuvant Chemo” before surgery? 5. Would a “Genomic Assay” help determine if I need chemotherapy? 6. What is chemotherapy? Chemotherapy is the use of certain medications to treat cancer systemically, meaning throughout the whole body. If needed, chemotherapy is usually given after surgery for invasive breast cancer. It is a more intense cancer treatment than hormonal therapy (usually pills). Only a minority of breast cancer patients will ever need it. These complex decisions are ones you will make with your medical oncologist. You will make better treatment choices when you are informed about chemotherapy and hormonal therapy before meeting with your medical oncologist. General indications for chemotherapy We outline below some of the more common indications for needing chemotherapy. The decision to undergo chemotherapy also involves being healthy enough to tolerate the treatment. Deciding who needs chemotherapy and what type of chemotherapy to administer is one of the most difficult decisions made in medicine. Your medical oncologist will guide you. Do my “receptors” suggest I need chemotherapy? Once a breast biopsy is found to be cancerous, the pathologists will automatically run more tests on the same tissue to determine what “receptors” are expressed. Your receptor pattern is a key piece of information that comes early in your breast cancer journey. In about 30% of patients with an invasive breast cancer, the receptor pattern alone can strongly suggest that chemotherapy will be needed regardless of what is found at surgery. The key points regarding receptors are outlined below. Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER -) tumors (20%) do not respond to anti-estrogen oral medications that are essential in treating estrogen receptor positive (ER +) tumors. Quite simply, patients with ER negative tumors will benefit from chemotherapy if they are healthy enough to tolerate it. ER negative tumors are more aggressive cancers, but respond more favorably to chemotherapy than ER positive breast cancers. HER2 Receptor Positive (HER2+) tumors (20%) are very responsive to chemotherapy when paired with new breakthrough drugs that target these tumors, such as Herceptin and Perjeta. The same holds true even if a HER2-positive tumor is also Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+). HER2+ tumors are more aggressive cancers, but we now can treat them more effectively with chemotherapy and new drugs that are “targeted” to destroy HER2-positive cancers. “Triple Negative” (ER-)(PR-)(HER2-) tumors are fast growing tumors that are usually treated with a specific chemotherapy regimen. These tumors are not responsive to hormonal therapy at all, but may be sensitive to chemotherapy. What if cancer is detected in the lymph nodes? If you have “lymph node positive” breast cancer, it is likely you will be offered chemotherapy. Premenopausal women and those with multiple “positive” lymph nodes generally benefit from chemotherapy. If your breast surgeon detects cancer in your lymph nodes before surgery, there may be specific advantages to undergoing “neoadjuvant chemotherapy.” “Inflammatory Breast Cancer” requires chemotherapy If you have been diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer, the first step is neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery. This type of cancer has a high likelihood of spreading to the lymph nodes and other parts of the body. Starting chemotherapy as soon as possible is essential to treating this aggressive breast cancer. A mastectomy is performed after chemotherapy, followed by radiation to the area of the mastectomy to lessen the chance of cancer growing back in that area. What are the advantages of “neoadjuvant chemotherapy”? Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is when chemotherapy is given before surgery, not afterwards. There are specific advantages to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in appropriately selected patients. How can a genomic “Oncotype DX” test be helpful? Patients who have a small, estrogen receptor positive, HER2 receptor negative tumor and no evidence of cancer in their lymph nodes may benefit from an Oncotype DX genomic assay. This cutting-edge test looks deeper into breast cancer cells to better identify people who may benefit from chemotherapy with ER+, HER2 – breast cancers.
Просмотров: 2675 Breast Cancer School for Patients
BREAST CANCER: ESTROGEN RECEPTORS
 
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BREAST CANCER: ESTROGEN RECEPTORS
Просмотров: 7460 Walter Jahn
Treatment Options for Early Stage Breast Cancer
 
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http://www.beetmedicine.tv/2009/06/treatment-options-for-early-stage-breast-cancer.html Hormone therapy is used in all stages of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. The success of five years of Tamoxifen in post menopausal women has been augmented by the addition of Aromatase inhibitors. Dr. Rugo describes the randomized clinical trials designed to determine the duration and sequencing of hormones and the different approaches required in pre and post menopausal women. Also, the emerging role of biphosphonates, a non-hormonal, non-chemotherapy approach to strengthening bone and preventing metastases. Interviewee: Hope S. Rugo, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine; Director, Breast Oncology Clinical Trials Program, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center Hope Rugo
Просмотров: 2937 BeetMedicineTV
Breast Cancer | Dr. Tony Talebi discusses "Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer".
 
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Dr. Tony Talebi discusses Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer with Dr. Lippman. For further discussion please visit http://www.HemOnc101.com Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the US. Important risk factors for breast cancer are age, gender, reproductive history, hormonal factors, and family history. Although a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer is common in patients diagnosed with breast cancer, less than ten percent of all breast cancers are associated with genetic mutations. Assay of hormone receptors (estrogen [ER] and progesterone [PR] receptors) is an important component of the pathologic evaluation of breast cancer, for both prognostic and predictive purposes, as patients with hormone receptor-positive tumors benefit from the addition of endocrine treatments. The treatment of early stage breast cancer includes the treatment of locoregional disease with surgery, radiation therapy, or both, and the treatment of systemic disease with one or a combination of chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, or biologic therapy. Here, Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the general concepts of what is estrogen receptor positive breast cancer with world renowned breast cancer expert Dr. Marc Lippman, professor and chairman of the department of medicine at the University of Miami. Dr. Marc Lippman pioneered the use of tamoxifen in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer with his early research while at the National Cancer Institute which revolutionized the treatment of breast cancer. The discussion includes symptoms, diagnosis, staging, genetic implications, surgery, radiation therapy, Oncotype DX testing, hormonal therapy including tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors and chemotherapy for breast cancer. Dr. Marc Lippman credentials: Certifications American Board of Internal Med-Medical Oncology American Board of Internal Medicine American Bd of Int Med-Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism Specialties Hematology/Oncology - Internal Medicine Internal Medicine Roles Interim Deputy Director, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center Professor and Chairman Biography Marc E. Lippman, M.D. was named the Kathleen and Stanley Glaser Professor of Medicine at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, and was named Chairman of the Department of Medicine in May 2007. Previously Dr. Lippman was the John G. Searle Professor and Chair of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. From 1988 through 1999 Dr. Lippman was Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology, and Chair, Department of Oncology at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and served as Director of the Lombardi Cancer Center at Georgetown University Medical Center. From 1978 through 1990 he was Clinical Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology, Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences. Dr. Lippman served as Head of the Medical Breast Cancer Section, Medicine Branch, at the National Institute of Health. He was a Senior Investigator at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institute of Health. Dr. Lippman completed a Fellowship in Endocrinology at Yale Medical School in New Haven, CT from 1973-1974. In addition, he was Clinical Associate at the National Cancer Institute from 1970-1971 and Clinical Associate at the Laboratory of Biochemistry of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institute of Health. From 1970 to 1988 he served as an Officer and Medical Director of the United States Public Health Service. Dr. Lippman completed his residency on the Osler Medical Service, John Hopkins Hospital, in Baltimore, Maryland from 1968-1970. A native of New York, Dr. Lippman received his Bachelor's Degree from Cornell University, Magna Cum Laude, and medical school degree at Yale Medical School in New Haven, CT where he was elected to AOA. Dr. Lippman is widely known for his research in breast cancer. Throughout his illustrious career he has received numerous awards including Mallinckrodt Award of the Clinical Radioassay Society in 1978; the Commendation Medal USPHS in 1982; Meritorius Service Medal, USPHS in 1987; Clinical Investigator Award, American Federation for Clinical Research in 1985; D.R. Edwards Lecture and Medal, Tenovus Institute, Wales 1985; Plenary Lecturer, British Association of Cancer Research in 1987; Gosse Lecture, Dalhuosie University, Halifax Nova Scotia in 1987; the American Cancer Society.
Просмотров: 2151 Tony Talebi, MD
Triple Negative Breast Cancer: What you need to know
 
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We teach you why Triple Negative Breast Cancer is threatening. Learn how it is treated, and it's link to the BRCA genetic mutation. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: 1. What exactly is triple negative breast cancer? 2. Will I need Chemotherapy? 3. What are the benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo? 4. Isn’t Neoadjuvant Chemo recommended more now? 5. Do I qualify for BRCA genetic testing? 6. Should I consider a Clinical Trial? 7. What is “Triple Negative” breast cancer? “Triple Negative” breast cancers are fast growing tumors that more frequently spread beyond the breast to other parts of the body. Because of this, they are a bigger threat to your life than most other types of cancers of similar size with a different receptor pattern. These cancers are called “triple negative” because the three most important breast cancer “receptors” on the surface of the cells are not present (negative). When present, these receptors are used as targets to attack the cancer with medications. When absent, the main medical therapy is chemotherapy. Your Breast Surgeon will know your “receptor pattern” within days after your initial breast biopsy. These results are often not communicated to you early on in your decision process. Although only 15% of breast cancers are “triple negative,” it is imperative that you specifically ask your surgeon immediately, and well before surgery, “What are my receptor results?” “Triple Negative” is treated with Chemotherapy These cancers are often sensitive to chemotherapy and it is offered to almost everyone healthy enough to tolerate it. Chemotherapy is obviously a more intense cancer treatment than hormonal therapy (pills). But unfortunately, since triple negative cancers do not have “Estrogen receptors” (ER negative), hormonal therapy is not helpful at all. The time to cure triple negative cancer is now, not when it recurs later. Chemotherapy and surgery is the standard for treating triple negative breast cancer. Ask about the benefits of “Neoadjuvant Chemo” What is often overlooked are the benefits of offering neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with triple negative, “Early-Stage” (I & II) breast cancer. There may be distinct advantages (listed below) to having chemotherapy before surgery, not after surgery if you have a triple negative tumor. The decision to consider neoadjuvant chemotherapy always begins with your breast surgeon. You must address this “cutting edge” treatment option well before surgery to benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Do not be afraid to ask. This is a very important question. The Potential Benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo: *Begin life-saving chemotherapy earlier *Reduce the need for a mastectomy *Improve cosmetic outcomes with a lumpectomy *Reduce the need for an “Axillary Dissection” *Allows more time for BRCA genetic testing *More time to think about “lumpectomy vs. mastectomy” *Shows your cancer team if the chemo is working *Can sometimes eliminate all cancer cells before surgery *May reduce the need for radiation after a mastectomy Ask for BRCA Genetic Testing Triple negative breast cancers can be associated with inherited genetic mutations. Any woman who has ever been diagnosed with a triple negative breast cancer at age 60 or younger is at a high risk for carrying the BRCA mutation. If you also have a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer you are at an even higher risk. Unfortunately, genetic testing is often not offered for triple negative breast cancer patients. It is important to ask for BRCA Genetic Testing in this situation. The BRCA (Breast Cancer) gene is commonly referred to as “The Breast Cancer Gene.” If someone inherits a broken version (mutation) of this gene at conception, they carry a very high lifetime risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. African Americans are a higher risk for Triple Negative African American and women of West African descent are at a higher risk of developing triple negative breast cancers than most other ethnic groups. Thirty percent (30%) of all breast cancers in this group are triple negative. Younger women are at a higher risk for Triple Negative Women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before 40 are at a higher risk for having triple negative disease when compared to older women. Any women diagnosed before the age of 50 qualifies for genetic testing and should consider genetic counseling. Ask if you would benefit from a Clinical Trial New therapies must be studied in clinical trials to make sure they are safe and effective at treating breast cancer. Ask your medical oncologist if they offer or recommend you participate in a clinical trial.
Просмотров: 4538 Breast Cancer School for Patients
BREAST CANCER ,Plant Based Diet May Convert Aggressive Type To Treatable One
 
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BREAST CANCER ,Plant Based Diet May Convert Aggressive Type To Treatable One. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have found a dietary combination that transforms the most lethal of all breast cancers into a highly treatable breast cancer. Specifically, scientists involved in the Scientific Reports study say a particular plant-based diet may be the key. Trygve Tollefsbol, Ph.D., D.O., professor of biology in the College of Arts and Sciences and senior scientist with the Comprehensive Cancer Center as well as Yuanyuan Li, M.D., Ph.D., a research assistant professor of biology, use epigenetics — the study of biological mechanisms that will switch genes on and off — as a mechanism to identify ways we can change human gene expressions in fatal diseases, including breast cancer. All breast cancers are either estrogen receptor-positive or estrogen receptor-negative. The tumors in estrogen receptor, or ER, negative breast cancer are much less likely to respond to hormone therapy than are tumors that are ER-positive, which means that ER-negative breast cancers are typically very aggressive. “Unfortunately, there are few options for women who develop ER-negative breast cancer,” Tollefsbol said. “Because of the poor prognosis this type of cancer carries, new advances in prevention and treatment for ER-negative breast cancer have particular significance.” With that in mind, Tollefsbol and fellow researchers set out to further research how scientists can efficiently neutralize mechanisms that lead to, and worsen, ER-negative cancers. Up until this time, conventional cancer prevention has focused primarily on single chemopreventive compounds. “One reason many in the field shy away from combining two or more compounds at a time for treatment research is the fear of adverse effects and potential interactions that are unknown,” Tollefsbol said. “To overcome that concern, we chose compounds that we felt confident would interact well together, because they have similar favorable biological effects but still have different mechanisms for carrying out these effects that would not interfere with one another.” Tollefsbol and his team identified two compounds in common foods that are known to have success in cancer prevention and that could potentially be combined to successfully “turn on” the ER gene in ER-negative breast cancer so that the cancer could be treated with estrogen receptor inhibitors such as tamoxifen. “One way we can use epigenetics as a powerful tool to fight cancer is through compounds found in our everyday diet,” Tollefsbol said. “Vegetables, for example, are filled with these types of compounds. Your mother always told you to eat your vegetables, and science now tells us she was right.” Another compound found in green tea has been shown to stimulate epigenetic changes in cancerous genes, according to prior studies from Tollefsbol’s lab. These compounds, used in the right way, can help modulate gene expression aberrations that are contributing to the disease. The researchers found that a combination of dietary plant-derived compounds consisting of sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli sprouts, along with polyphenols from green tea, is successful in preventing and treating ER-negative breast cancer in mice that are genetically programed to develop ER-negative breast cancer at high rates. Further investigation revealed that the mechanism for the efficacy of these two dietary compounds involved epigenetic changes induced in the ER gene regulatory region. With the combined dietary treatment the researchers administered, the tumors in the mice were converted from ER-negative to ER-positive cancers. This rendered the breast cancer easily treatable with tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor inhibitor. “The results of this research provide a novel approach to preventing and treating ER-negative breast cancer, which currently takes hundreds of thousands of lives worldwide,” said Li. “The next step would be to move this to clinical trial, and to eventually be able to provide more effective treatment options for women either predisposed to or afflicted with this deadly disease.”
Просмотров: 5609 Be Healthy
Breast Cancer Hormone Therapy: What Is It And Who Needs It?
 
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In this video, Dr. Jay K. Harness discusses hormone therapy, or anti-hormone therapy as he calls it, for premenopausal and post-menopausal breast cancer patients. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 14839 Breast Cancer Answers®
Advancements in Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer
 
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Ingrid A. Mayer, MD, MSCI, and Hope S. Rugo, MD, discuss the role of targeted therapies in the treatment of estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer.
Просмотров: 4120 OncLiveTV
Treatment Strategies in ER-Positive Breast Cancer
 
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Adam Brufsky, MD, discusses tamoxifen therapy and the use of genomic assays in estrogen-receptor positive metastatic breast cancer. For more expert insight, visit http://www.onclive.com/insights/evolution-metastatic-breast-cancer
Просмотров: 377 OncLiveTV
HER2-Positive Breast Cancer—Reduce Your Risk of Recurrence
 
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Every two minutes, one woman is diagnosed with breast cancer somewhere in the United States. In every five women diagnosed, about one will have HER2-positive breast cancer, which is a more aggressive form of the disease known to put patients at a higher risk of recurrence. On this episode of Access Health, host Ereka Vetrini welcomes Dr. Reshma Mahtani, a medical oncologist practicing in South Florida. Join them as they engage in an in-depth discussion on reducing the risk of recurrence in HER2-positive breast cancer. Dr. Mahtani talks about the various options available to help reduce the risk of recurrence. We also listen to a few empowering stories from women across the country who have been diagnosed with HER2-positive breast cancer, leaving no stone unturned in their fight. Visit Us: http://www.accesshealth.tv Like Us: https://www.facebook.com/accesshealthtv #AccessHealth Access Health brings a panel of three renowned experts to tackle important health and wellness topics in the fields of Medical, Nutrition and Fitness all from the female perspective. You can have access to healthier living, so tune in to Access Health airing Wednesday at 7:30 am ET/PT on Lifetime. AH0044 104744
Просмотров: 1179 Access Health
Adjuvant Therapy in Early-Stage ER-Positive, HER2-Negative Invasive Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Hope Rugo shares her experience on the recommended treatment approach for ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer patients. She comments on what is the expected benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy and endocrine therapy in luminal breast cancers and mentions that one of the greatest challenges is to understand the heterogeneity of the tumor. She also provides interesting comments on the use of criteria like tumor grade and size to select the patients for adjuvant chemotherapy as well as the usage of IHC markers such hormone receptors ER-positive, PR and Growth Factor Receptor HER2 to identify patients for chemotherapy. Finally, she speaks about tools such Adjuvant! Online and Predict and debates if these tools could be used to select luminal breast cancer patients confidently for adjuvant chemotherapy. _______________________________________________________ Hope Rugo, MD, is the Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology); and Director, Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education at the University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Просмотров: 9046 Genomic Health, Inc.
Herceptin (trastuzumab) for HER2-Positive Breast and Stomach Cancer
 
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Herceptin (trastuzumab) is an approved #targetedtherapy cancer treatment for breast, stomach and esophagus cancers that are HER2-positive - positive for the Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 protein. Breast cancers with too much of this protein tend to grow and spread more aggressively without special treatment. About 20% of breast cancer cases and 10-20% of stomach cancers are HER2-positive. In this video, oncologist Stephen Lemon MD describes how this cancer treatment works, as well as what types of side effects it may cause. #Herceptin is an artificially created antibody that works to fight off cancer cells much like naturally produced antibodies which fight off germs. Herceptin is a targeted drug therapy that attacks a specific protein called the HER2 protein, which causes cancer cells to grow. Herceptin is made by Genentech. Dr. Stephen Lemon is a medical oncologist and is not affiliated with Genentech. Visit Http://www.oacancer.com to learn more about Oncology Associates. #breastcancer #HER2positive Dr Stephen Lemon is medical oncologist who now practices at Overlake Cancer Center Bellevue WA. He produces cancer information videos and web related cancer education projects. He invites you to follow his ongoing work at http://lightersideofcancer.com
Просмотров: 9169 Oncology Associates
Latest Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer Information
 
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This power point presentation was given by Dr. Joe Veltmann on August 28th in Guadalajara, Mexico before 200+ medical doctors who heard Dr. Bernard Esquivel speak about pharmacogenomics and Dr. Veltmann about the ER + breast cancer research and how nutrigenomics may play a role in preventing its recurrence.
Просмотров: 1746 Joe Veltmann
Hormonal Therapy for Breast Cancer
 
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Post-surgical treatment depends on the type and stage of breast cancer. Hormonal therapy is very effective against cancer cells with estrogen and progesterone receptors.
Просмотров: 3611 Everyday Health
Estrogen & Progesterone and Cancer: A Medical Literature Review
 
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Recently a medical board brought charges against a physician for using micronized progesterone in a menopausal woman who had a hysterectomy and a very positive family history of breast cancer. This lecture will review the defense that I successfully used as well as the medical literature support for optimizing hormones for health and wellness that the medical board and medical experts were not aware of. Visit my website at http://nealrouzier.com to see where I will be speaking next.
Просмотров: 5640 Neal Rouzier
How Estrogen Increases the Risk of Breast Cancer
 
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Undergraduate biology student Agreen Hadadi looks at the effects of estrogen on cancer cells and how different receptors in the cells react to estrogen. Hadadi is working in the lab of Barbara Boyan, professor in the Georgia Tech/Emory Department of Biomedical Engineering, along with graduate researcher Reyhaan Chaudhri. Video: Taylor Wrobel, Drew Schneider, David Terraso
Просмотров: 4772 Georgia Tech College of Sciences
Triple positive breast cancer patient doing well after treatment by Loyola’s multidisciplinary team
 
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Beth Ryan feared her life might be cut short after being diagnosed with triple-positive breast cancer during the week of her 49th birthday. But after a variety of treatments at Loyola’s multidisciplinary Breast Oncology Center, her prognosis is very good. “She is a perfect example of how we attack breast cancer on many fronts now, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation, novel antibodies and anti-estrogen therapy,” said her medical oncologist, Kathy S. Albain, MD, FACP, FASCO. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please visit https://www.loyolamedicine.org/cancer/breast-cancer or call 888-584-7888.
Просмотров: 2242 Loyola Medicine
Less Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: The TAILORx Results
 
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We teach you about the TAILORx clinical trial results and how this information may save many women in the future from chemotherapy. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: *Do I qualify for an Oncotype DX genomic test? *If so, will you order genomic testing for me? *What if I have an "Intermediate" result? *Do you follow the "TAILORx" trial recommendations? *Would you order a genomic test before I see a medical oncologist? What does the TAILORx Clinical Trial results mean to me? On June 3rd, 2018 the results of the largest breast cancer trial reported results that help us better determine who MAY benefit or MAY NOT benefit from chemotherapy in early stage, favorable breast cancers. The results help patients and physicians better interpret the results from the genomic assay, Oncotype DX, which is commonly used in the United States. The trial concludes that most patients with an "Intermediate Recurrence Score" result may avoid chemotherapy. The results were also released for publication by the New England Journal of Medicine. Journal Article Link: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1804710 Video Outlining the TAILORx Clinical Trial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orwPgT0ZP_0&t=14s What is a genomic test? These sophisticated tests are performed on a small sample of cancer tissue in appropriate patients with early stage breast cancer. Genomic tests are usually ordered after surgery when the pathology report is finalized. It measures unique aspects of the tumor to determine if a patient will benefit from chemotherapy in addition to hormonal therapy. Such “genomic assays” developed over the last decade are a dramatic advance in breast cancer care. The Oncotype DX assay by Genomic Health Inc. is the most utilized genomic assay of those available in the United States. Who should consider a genomic test? Patients who have small “Estrogen receptor positive” (ER+) and “HER2 receptor negative” (HER2-) tumors and no evidence of cancer in their lymph nodes may benefit from an Oncotype DX assay. The purpose of this test is to better identify people who do and do not benefit from chemotherapy. The decision to undergo chemotherapy is a complicated one. Your medical oncologist will examine multiple factors to help determine if you will benefit from chemotherapy. The NCCN Guidelines, listed in the website links below, outline in much greater detail recommendations for the use of genomic tests. An Oncotype DX test can be instrumental in this decision for many patients. You may qualify for a Genomic Assay if… You have early stage cancer (Stage I or II) Your tumor is Estrogen receptor positive (ER+) Your tumor is Her2 receptor negative (HER2-) No cancer was found in your lymph nodes You are willing to consider having chemotherapy You are healthy enough to undergo chemotherapy How is chemotherapy tailored to patients? Genomic breast cancer tests are a leap forward in our ability to “look inside” breast cancer cells. Sophisticated breast cancer care is based upon the principle of providing maximal benefit from the least toxic therapy. Newly diagnosed breast cancer patients deserve the best information available to decide whether they need chemotherapy. Take our video lesson on “Will I Need Chemotherapy?“ (here) to understand the general concepts. Genomics is a promising and rapidly developing field. Take Home Message: Make sure to ask both your breast surgeon and medical oncologist if a genomic assay might play a role in your treatment decisions. For appropriate patients, these tests should be considered only one piece of the many “pieces of the puzzle” in deciding treatment decisions about chemotherapy and hormonal therapy.
Просмотров: 21207 Breast Cancer School for Patients
First-Line ER-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Treatments
 
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Joanne Blum, MD, PhD, Adam Brufsky, MD, PhD, and Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD, discuss the first-line treatment of estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. For more expert insight, visit http://www.onclive.com/insights/evolution-metastatic-breast-cancer
Просмотров: 361 OncLiveTV
Treating Metastatic ER+ Breast Cancer
 
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Gretchen G. Kimmick, MD, MS, considers goals of therapy and potential treatment options for a patient who develops metastatic disease following initial treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. For more resources and information regarding anticancer targeted therapies: http://targetedonc.com/
Просмотров: 32 Targeted Oncology
New breast cancer drug study results are promising.
 
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Researchers are encouraged by the early results for patients using Z-endoxifen. The potent derivative of the drug tamoxifen was given to women with estrogen receptor positive metastatic breast cancer, the most common form of breast cancer in women whose disease has spread. The phase I study demonstrated endoxifen shows promise for patients whose cancer had continued to progress with standard estrogen therapies, including tamoxifen.
Просмотров: 1201 Mayo Clinic
Treatment for Early-Stage ER+ Breast Cancer
 
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Hope S. Rugo, MD, and Ruth O’Regan, MD, discuss adjuvant and neoadjuvant endocrine therapy as treatment for early-stage estrogen receptor(ER)–positive breast cancer.
Просмотров: 544 OncLiveTV
Safety of pregnancy in patients with history of ER-positive breast cancer
 
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Matteo Lambertini talks about the long term results analysis from an international study exploring the safety of pregnancy in patients with an history of ER positive breast cancer. At 10 years, no significant difference was observed in DFS or OS. Abstract as referenced in the ASCO 2017 programme: LBA 10066: Safety of pregnancy in patients with history of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer Long-term follow-up analysis from a multi center study. Produced by the European Society for Medical Oncology http://www.esmo.oncologypro.org
Просмотров: 333 European Society for Medical Oncology
Ibrance an Advanced Breast Cancer Treatment
 
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Ibrance (palbociclib) is a promising new hormone based cancer treatment for advanced breast cancer. This new drug is intended to help patients who are post menopausal and whose metastatic cancer tests positive for an estrogen receptor (ER) as well as tests negative for the HER2 protein. In this cancer education video Dr. Stephen Lemon talks about how this targeted therapy works as well as mentions the types of side effects patients may experience. Visit http://www.canceris.net to find and share cancer information. #Ibrance is made by Pfizer. Dr. Stephen Lemon is a medical oncologist and is not affiliated with #Pfizer. #MetastaticCancer Dr Stephen Lemon is medical oncologist who now practices at Overlake Cancer Center Bellevue WA. He produces cancer information videos and web related cancer education projects. He invites you to follow his ongoing work at http://lightersideofcancer.com
Просмотров: 6184 Oncology Associates
Say No to Aromatase Inhibitors
 
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Say No!! to Aromatase Inhibitors There are two kinds of hormone therapy for breast cancer: 1. One stops estrogen from acting on breast cancer cells, like Tamoxifen. 2. The other interferes with estrogen production by aromatase inhibition (AI), like Letrozole, Anastrozole, and Exemestane. The two therapies differ in their action and side effects (toxicities) 1. The effect of the first is local. It acts only on breast cancer cells and does not interfere with hormone production. 2. Effect the other is systemic. Since interfering with the aromatase enzyme it affects processes in the body which depend on sex hormones. Aromatase inhibitors (AI) have grave side effects. Although Tamoxifen is the best drug on the market it is being replaced by inferior aromatase inhibitors that are far more toxic than tamoxifen. It turns out that AI did not undergo the scrutiny which would justify their distribution. Actually aromatase inhibitors cause a systemic disease, which evolves over time. I shall now explain in plain language how these bad drugs are distributed. These trials were approved by FDA. They represent a trend to replace Overall survival (OS) with Disease free survival (DFS). 1. FDA accepts survival statistics based on two endpoints, clinical and surrogate. 2. Clinical endpoint is always reliable since it is based on a clear cut event, death. 3. Surrogate endpoint is generally unreliable Clinicians who treat these toxicities believe that they are unavoidable. They are regarded as a reasonable price for cancer therapy. In reality these bad drugs are an outcome of a false cancer theory, which is discussed in other presentation.
Просмотров: 10443 Gershom Zajicek M.D,
Advanced Estrogen Positive Breast Cancer
 
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Jeffrey Hargis, MD, Hematologist and Oncologist at Kentuckiana Cancer Institute, Louisville, Kentucky, and Svetislava Vukelja, MD, Medical Oncologist and Hematologist at Tyler Cancer Center - US Oncology, Tyler, Texas (Part 1 of 5)
Просмотров: 236 Vital Options International
Treatment of estrogen resistant breast cancer
 
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http://www.thepatientsvoice.org Join us today Marie tells her story of treatment with early stage estrogen receptive breast cancer which is Her 2 positive. To take part in this online discussion please go to http://www.thepatientsvoice.org/Treatment_of_estrogen_resistant_breast_cancer.asp
Просмотров: 1514 PatientsVoice
HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: Shelly's Story
 
02:20
Shelly Levin talks about how she has benefited from targeted drug therapy for her breast cancer. For more info visit: http://www.northshore.org/healthy-you/breast-cancer-screening/
Просмотров: 6325 NorthShore University HealthSystem
Breast Cancer | Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the Treatment of Stage 4 ER+ Breast Cancer?"
 
14:26
Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the Treatment of Stage 4 ER+ Breast Cancer with Dr. Lippman. For further discussion visit http://www.HemOnc101.com Treatment of metastatic stage 4 estrogen receptor positive breast cancer Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the US. Important risk factors for breast cancer are age, gender, reproductive history, hormonal factors, and family history. Although a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer is common in patients diagnosed with breast cancer, less than ten percent of all breast cancers are associated with genetic mutations. Assay of hormone receptors (estrogen [ER] and progesterone [PR] receptors) is an important component of the pathologic evaluation of breast cancer, for both prognostic and predictive purposes, as patients with hormone receptor-positive tumors benefit from the addition of endocrine treatments. The treatment of early stage breast cancer includes the treatment of locoregional disease with surgery, radiation therapy, or both, and the treatment of systemic disease with one or a combination of chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, or biologic therapy. Here, Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the treatment of metastatic stage 4 estrogen receptor positive breast cancer with world renowned breast cancer expert Dr. Marc Lippman, professor and chairman of the department of medicine at the University of Miami. Dr. Marc Lippman pioneered the use of tamoxifen in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer with his early research while at the National Cancer Institute which revolutionized the treatment of breast cancer. The discussion includes symptoms, diagnosis, staging, genetic implications, surgery, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy including tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors and chemotherapy for breast cancer. Dr. Marc Lippman credentials: Certifications American Board of Internal Med-Medical Oncology American Board of Internal Medicine American Bd of Int Med-Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism Specialties Hematology/Oncology - Internal Medicine Internal Medicine Roles Interim Deputy Director, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center Professor and Chairman Biography Marc E. Lippman, M.D. was named the Kathleen and Stanley Glaser Professor of Medicine at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, and was named Chairman of the Department of Medicine in May 2007. Previously Dr. Lippman was the John G. Searle Professor and Chair of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. From 1988 through 1999 Dr. Lippman was Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology, and Chair, Department of Oncology at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and served as Director of the Lombardi Cancer Center at Georgetown University Medical Center. From 1978 through 1990 he was Clinical Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology, Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences. Dr. Lippman served as Head of the Medical Breast Cancer Section, Medicine Branch, at the National Institute of Health. He was a Senior Investigator at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institute of Health. Dr. Lippman completed a Fellowship in Endocrinology at Yale Medical School in New Haven, CT from 1973-1974. In addition, he was Clinical Associate at the National Cancer Institute from 1970-1971 and Clinical Associate at the Laboratory of Biochemistry of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institute of Health. From 1970 to 1988 he served as an Officer and Medical Director of the United States Public Health Service. Dr. Lippman completed his residency on the Osler Medical Service, John Hopkins Hospital, in Baltimore, Maryland from 1968-1970. A native of New York, Dr. Lippman received his Bachelor's Degree from Cornell University, Magna Cum Laude, and medical school degree at Yale Medical School in New Haven, CT where he was elected to AOA. Dr. Lippman is widely known for his research in breast cancer. Throughout his illustrious career he has received numerous awards including Mallinckrodt Award of the Clinical Radioassay Society in 1978; the Commendation Medal USPHS in 1982; Meritorius Service Medal, USPHS in 1987; Clinical Investigator Award, American Federation for Clinical Research in 1985; D.R. Edwards Lecture and Medal, Tenovus Institute, Wales 1985; Plenary Lecturer, British Association of Cancer Research in 1987; Gosse Lecture, Dalhuosie University, Halifax Nova Scotia in 1987; the American Cancer Society.
Просмотров: 674 Tony Talebi, MD
The Budwig Diet DOESN'T Cure Breast Cancer
 
03:12
This breast cancer patient tried to "cure" her breast cancer with The Budwig Diet. "See" how the plant estrogen, flax, caused her breast cancer to grow since her cancer is estrogen receptor positive, which means plant estrogens will stimulate it. Breast thermography research is proving plant estrogens stimulate breast cancer and is one of the reasons breast cancer is continuing to rise. Flax also increases estrogen dominance, Low T and early puberty. Breast thermography evaluates the health of the breast and is proving plant estrogens increase estrogen dominance, which causes PMS, symptoms of menopause, infertility, weight gain and risk of breast cancer. Have questions? We have the answers! Read THE book for more groundbreaking research and information based off 50 years of thermographic research, "Breast Cancer Boot Camp-Dr. Hobbins's Breast Thermography Revolution" www.abreastboutique.com From the pioneers in breast thermography, the consumer advocacy group The Women's Academy of Breast Thermography, The Pink Bow-Breast Thermography Research and Education non-profit.
Просмотров: 1833 The Boob Tube
Breast Cancer | Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the Treatment of Locally Advanced ER+ Breast Cancer
 
16:16
Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the Treatment of Locally Advanced Stage 1 to 3 Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer with Dr. Lippman. For further discussion visit http://www.HemOnc101.com Treatment of locally advanced stage 1 to 3 estrogen receptor positive breast cancer Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the US. Important risk factors for breast cancer are age, gender, reproductive history, hormonal factors, and family history. Although a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer is common in patients diagnosed with breast cancer, less than ten percent of all breast cancers are associated with genetic mutations. Assay of hormone receptors (estrogen [ER] and progesterone [PR] receptors) is an important component of the pathologic evaluation of breast cancer, for both prognostic and predictive purposes, as patients with hormone receptor-positive tumors benefit from the addition of endocrine treatments. The treatment of early stage breast cancer includes the treatment of locoregional disease with surgery, radiation therapy, or both, and the treatment of systemic disease with one or a combination of chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, or biologic therapy. Here, Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the treatment of locally advanced stage 1 to 3 estrogen receptor positive breast cancer with world renowned breast cancer expert Dr. Marc Lippman, professor and chairman of the department of medicine at the University of Miami. Dr. Marc Lippman pioneered the use of tamoxifen in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer with his early research while at the National Cancer Institute which revolutionized the treatment of breast cancer. The discussion includes symptoms, diagnosis, staging, genetic implications, surgery, radiation therapy, Oncotype DX testing, hormonal therapy including tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors and chemotherapy for breast cancer. Dr. Marc Lippman credentials: Certifications American Board of Internal Med-Medical Oncology American Board of Internal Medicine American Bd of Int Med-Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism Specialties Hematology/Oncology - Internal Medicine Internal Medicine Roles Interim Deputy Director, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center Professor and Chairman Biography Marc E. Lippman, M.D. was named the Kathleen and Stanley Glaser Professor of Medicine at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, and was named Chairman of the Department of Medicine in May 2007. Previously Dr. Lippman was the John G. Searle Professor and Chair of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. From 1988 through 1999 Dr. Lippman was Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology, and Chair, Department of Oncology at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and served as Director of the Lombardi Cancer Center at Georgetown University Medical Center. From 1978 through 1990 he was Clinical Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology, Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences. Dr. Lippman served as Head of the Medical Breast Cancer Section, Medicine Branch, at the National Institute of Health. He was a Senior Investigator at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institute of Health. Dr. Lippman completed a Fellowship in Endocrinology at Yale Medical School in New Haven, CT from 1973-1974. In addition, he was Clinical Associate at the National Cancer Institute from 1970-1971 and Clinical Associate at the Laboratory of Biochemistry of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institute of Health. From 1970 to 1988 he served as an Officer and Medical Director of the United States Public Health Service. Dr. Lippman completed his residency on the Osler Medical Service, John Hopkins Hospital, in Baltimore, Maryland from 1968-1970. A native of New York, Dr. Lippman received his Bachelor's Degree from Cornell University, Magna Cum Laude, and medical school degree at Yale Medical School in New Haven, CT where he was elected to AOA. Dr. Lippman is widely known for his research in breast cancer. Throughout his illustrious career he has received numerous awards including Mallinckrodt Award of the Clinical Radioassay Society in 1978; the Commendation Medal USPHS in 1982; Meritorius Service Medal, USPHS in 1987; Clinical Investigator Award, American Federation for Clinical Research in 1985; D.R. Edwards Lecture and Medal, Tenovus Institute, Wales 1985; Plenary Lecturer, British Association of Cancer Research in 1987; Gosse Lecture, Dalhuosie University, Halifax Nova Scotia in 1987; the American Cancer Society.
Просмотров: 763 Tony Talebi, MD
Dr. Callahan on Endocrine Therapy in Patients With ER-Positive Breast Cancer
 
01:54
Rena D. Callahan, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, University of California, Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the use of endocrine therapy in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer.
Просмотров: 82 OncLiveTV
Hormone Receptor-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer: Challenges and New Treatment Options
 
01:25:42
This webcast provides expert insight on management strategies for patients with HR-positive breast cancer. Over a review of several cases, the faculty will provide their assessments, as well as additional details on current abemaclib, ribociclib, palbociclib, and faslodex studies, everolimus and NSABP B 42, breast cancer index and other biomarkers. The webcast is moderated by Dr. Jame Abraham of the Cleveland Clinic. Visit http://www.ccfcme.org/tumorboard to claim CME credit or learn more about the Biologic Therapies VII series. Interested in related CME education? Visit http://www.ccfcme.org
Просмотров: 153 ClevelandClinicCME