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Interpreting a Urine Culture & Sensitivity
 
07:49
Keeping it Simple
Просмотров: 83745 Jamie Corroon
Treating & Preventing Urinary Tract Infections
 
01:47
Dr. Natasha Withers discusses the symptoms of a urinary tract infection and how to treat it.To view over 15,000 other how-to, DIY, and advice videos on any topic, visit http://www.monkeysee.com/
Просмотров: 713416 MonkeySee
Antibiotics classification and mechanism of action | easy tricks to remember with mnemonics
 
07:08
Antibiotics classification and mechanism of action - This lecture explains shortcut tricks and mnemonics to understand the classification of antibiotics and mechanism of action of different antibiotics.It explains how antibiotics work. So watch this video lecture to know the antibiotics mechanism of action. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching the lecture on antibiotics mechanism of action.
Просмотров: 41424 Shomu's Biology
Mechanisms and Classification of Antibiotics (Antibiotics - Lecture 3)
 
24:21
A summary of the mechanisms and classification of antibiotics, with particular focus on penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, quinolones, and aminoglycosides. A brief description of the discovery of penicillin is also reviewed.
Просмотров: 519699 Strong Medicine
Cital Syrup Is It Safe ? uses composition side effect precaution how to use & review
 
02:20
Cital Syrup Is It Safe ? uses composition side effect precaution how to use & review Cital syrup is used as an anti-oxidant and to improve the effects of anti-oxidants. It is manufactured by Indoco Remedies. It is available as oral syrup in the packaging of 100 ml per bottle. What are the Generic Name(s) Generic name for Cital syrup is Disodium Hydrogen Citrate. Cital syrup is available in liquid form with composition of 1.37 grams of Disodium Hydrogen Citrate per 5 ml. How does it work ? The Disodium Hydrogen Citrate in Cital Syrup belongs to a class of drugs called urinary alkalizers and is also a Systemic alkaliser. Disodium Hydrogen Citrate works by neutralizing the excess acid in the blood and urine.It is also used as acidity regulator and sequestrate and used to treat urinary tract infection and kidney stones among other Indications. What are it’s uses ? Cital Syrup is used for the treatment of Urinary tract infection Kidney stones Uremic acidosis Burning micturition Adjuvant to sulphonamide therapy Acidosis following diarrhoea Renal tubular acidosis Cital syrup is quite effective in the treatment of the indications such as urinary tract infection, kidney stones etc., The onset of action from Disodium Hydrogen Citrate is within a minute and lasts for 4 to 6 hours after taking the medicine. What are the Side Effects ? The reported side-effects occurring from the use of this syrup include Cramping in stomach Flatulence Diuresis (Excess production of urine) Anxiety Gastrointestinal ulceration Diarrhea Deficiency of potassium in blood Tiredness Mood swings In cases of frequent use or over dosage of Cital syrup, especially in renal impairment, it becomes the cause of metabolic alkalosis . Cital syrup has to be taken orally, as per age slabs described below Infants & children up to 7 years: 2 ml three times per day Children from 7 years to 12 years: 5 ml three times per day Children above 13 years : 15 ml to 30 ml two to three times per day, after dissolving in water Adults : 15 ml to 30 ml two to three times per day, after dissolving in water Following precautions should be exercised while taking this drug: Don’t take this medicine on empty stomach Take plenty of water and juices with the medicine Tell your doctor if you have any kidney disorders or heart related problems Tell your doctor if you have high potassium levels in your blood Tell your doctor if you are planning your pregnancy or if you are pregnant or if you think you are pregnant You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to Disodium Hydrogen Citrate or any of it’s ingredients Don’t take this medicine if you are dehydrated Don’t take this medicine if you are suffering from any severe bacterial infection Electrolytes need to be monitored , especially potassium and sodium closely in the case of massive overdose, severe diarrhea or those symptomatic patients with heart failure Consult the Doctor before taking this medicine Cital syrup should not be taken by the pregnant women as it may cause some serious damage to the unborn baby. If a urologist prescribes this medicine, a maternal-fetal expert needs to be consulted to assess the potential risks & benefits of taking this medicine. Disodium Hydrogen Citrate should not be taken while breast feeding as it might get transferred to the new born through the breast milk.Consult a doctor to find an alternate drug. This medicine can be given to children above age 7 quite safely, but can be given to children below age 7 and infants only on doctor’s advise. Disodium Hydrogen Citrate syrup is not available as over the counter product. It is a prescription drug. #onlinemedicine,#medicine,#ayurveda,#ayurved ,#Ayurvedic
Просмотров: 56122 Medicine Reviews
Audio Wikipedia - Análisis de orina
 
15:25
Audio Wikipedia - Análisis de orina
Просмотров: 179 Víctor Manuel Rengifo
Better, Faster, Stronger: Clinical Microbiology in the Era of MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry
 
58:56
Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has revolutionized the identification of microorganisms in clinical microbiology laboratories worldwide. Whereas routine microorganisms traditionally often took 18-24 hours to be identified, MALDI-TOF-MS leads to accurate identification in a matter of minutes. In this presentation, we review how MALDI-TOF-MS is enabling microbiology laboratories to improve their workflow as well as discussing new frontiers for the application of this technology in the field of clinical microbiology. Susan Butler-Wu, PhD, D (ABMM) 02/04/2015 http://uwtv.org
Просмотров: 7273 UW Video
How to Read and Interpret an Antibiogram
 
13:10
IPRO created the first YouTube video intended to instruct clinicians on how to properly read and interpret an antibiogram as part of a project focused on implementing antibiotic stewardship in the outpatient setting. The video provides a discussion of the content, interpretation and limitations of an antibiogram in a case based format. The four outpatient cases highlight how an antibiogram can be used as part of the decision making process.
Просмотров: 4506 IPROdotORG
Dr. Tripta Gupta- Menstrual Disorder (Hindi)
 
02:50
Просмотров: 2618747 AskDabur
Urine Trouble
 
52:33
When should you commit to getting urine? When can you wait? When should you forgo testing altogether?   When do I get urine? Symptoms – either typical dysuria, urgency, frequency in a verbal child, or non-descript abdominal pain or vomiting in a well appearing child. Fever – but first look for an obvious alternative source, especially viral signs or symptoms. No obvious source? Risk stratify before “just getting a urine”. In a low risk child, with obviously very vigilant parents, who is well appearing, you may choose not to test now, and ensure close follow up. Bag or cath? The short answer is: always cath, never bag. (Pros and cons in audio) What is the definition of a UTI? According to the current clinical practice guideline by the AAP, the standard definition of a urinary tract infection is the presence of BOTH pyuria AND at least 50 000 colonies per mL of a single uropathogen. Making the diagnosis in the ED: The presence of WBCs with a threshold of 5 or greater WBCs per HPF is required. What else goes into the urinalysis that may be helpful? Pearl: nitrites are poorly sensitive in children.  It takes 4 hours for nitrites to form, and most children this age do no hold their urine. Pearl: the enhanced urinalysis is the addition of a gram stain.  A positive gram stain has a LR+ of 87 in infants less than 60 days, according to a study by Dayan et al. in Pediatric Emergency Care. When can I just call it pyelonephritis? In an adult, we look for UTI plus evidence of focal upper tract involvement, like CVA tenderness to percussion or systemic signs like nausea, vomiting, or fever.  It is usually straightforward. It’s for this reason that the literature uses the term “febrile UTI” for children.  Fever is very sensitive, but not specific in children. The ill-appearing child has pyelonephritis.   The well-appearing child likely has a “febrile UTI”, without upper involvement.  However, undetected upper tract involvement may be made in retrospect via imaging, if done. How should I treat UTIs? For simple lower tract disease, treat for at least 7 days.  There is no evidence to support 7 versus 10 versus 14 days.  My advice: use 7-10 days as your range for simple febrile UTI in children. Pyelonephritis should be treated for a longer duration.  Treat pyelonephritis for 10-14 days. What should we give them? Sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim (Bactrim) is falling out of favor, mostly because isolates in many communities are resistant.  There is an association of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) with Bactrim use.  This may be confounded by its prior popularity; any antibiotic can cause SJS, but there are more case reports with Bactrim. Cephalexin (Keflex): 25 mg/kg dose, either BID or TID.  It is easy on the stomach, rarely interacts with other meds, has high efficacy against E. coli, and most importantly, cephalexin has good parenchymal penetration. Nitrofurantoin is often used in pregnant women, because the drug tends to concentrate locally in the urine.  However, blood and tissue concentrations are weak.  It may be ineffective if there is some sub-clinical upper tract involvement. Cefdinir is a 3rd generation cephalosporin available by mouth, given at 14 mg/kg in either one dose daily or divided BID, up to max of 600 mg.  This may be an option for an older child who has pyelonephritis, but is well enough to go home. Whom should we admit? The first thing to consider is age.  Any infant younger than 2 months should be admitted for a febrile UTI.  Their immune systems and physiologic reserve are just not sufficient to localize and fight off infections reliably. The truth is, for serious bacterial illness like pneumonia, UTI, or severe soft tissue infections, be careful with any infant less than 4-6 months of age. Of course, the unwell child – whatever his age – he should be admitted.  Think about poor feeding, irritability, dehydration – in that case, just go with your gut and call it pyelonephritis, and admit. What is the age cut-off for a urine culture? In adults, we think of urine culture only for high-risk populations, such as pregnant women, the immunocompromised, those with renal abnormalities, the neurologically impaired, or the critically ill, to name a few. In children, it’s a little simpler.  Do it for everyone. Who is everyone? Think of the urine rule of 10s: 10% of young febrile children will have a UTI 10% of UAs will show no evidence of pyuria Routine urine culture in all children with suspected or confirmed UTI up to about age 10 What do I do then with urine culture results? From a quality improvement and safety perspective, consider making this a regular assignment to a qualified clinician. Check once in 24-48 hours to find...
Просмотров: 49 Tim Horeczko
Urine Trouble
 
52:33
When should you commit to getting urine? When can you wait? When should you forgo testing altogether? When do I get urine? Symptoms – either typical dysuria, urgency, frequency in a verbal child, or non-descript abdominal pain or vomiting in a well appearing child. Fever – but first look for an obvious alternative source, especially viral signs or symptoms. No obvious source? Risk stratify before “just getting a urine”. In a low risk child, with obviously very vigilant parents, who is well appearing, you may choose not to test now, and ensure close follow up. Bag or cath? The short answer is: always cath, never bag. (Pros and cons in audio) What is the definition of a UTI? According to the current clinical practice guideline by the AAP, the standard definition of a urinary tract infection is the presence of BOTH pyuria AND at least 50 000 colonies per mL of a single uropathogen. Making the diagnosis in the ED: The presence of WBCs with a threshold of 5 or greater WBCs per HPF is required. What else goes into the urinalysis that may be helpful? Pearl: nitrites are poorly sensitive in children.  It takes 4 hours for nitrites to form, and most children this age do no hold their urine. Pearl: the enhanced urinalysis is the addition of a gram stain.  A positive gram stain has a LR+ of 87 in infants less than 60 days, according to a study by Dayan et al. in Pediatric Emergency Care. When can I just call it pyelonephritis? In an adult, we look for UTI plus evidence of focal upper tract involvement, like CVA tenderness to percussion or systemic signs like nausea, vomiting, or fever.  It is usually straightforward. It’s for this reason that the literature uses the term “febrile UTI” for children.  Fever is very sensitive, but not specific in children. The ill-appearing child has pyelonephritis.   The well-appearing child likely has a “febrile UTI”, without upper involvement.  However, undetected upper tract involvement may be made in retrospect via imaging, if done. How should I treat UTIs? For simple lower tract disease, treat for at least 7 days.  There is no evidence to support 7 versus 10 versus 14 days.  My advice: use 7-10 days as your range for simple febrile UTI in children. Pyelonephritis should be treated for a longer duration.  Treat pyelonephritis for 10-14 days. What should we give them? Sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim (Bactrim) is falling out of favor, mostly because isolates in many communities are resistant.  There is an association of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) with Bactrim use.  This may be confounded by its prior popularity; any antibiotic can cause SJS, but there are more case reports with Bactrim. Cephalexin (Keflex): 25 mg/kg dose, either BID or TID.  It is easy on the stomach, rarely interacts with other meds, has high efficacy against E. coli, and most importantly, cephalexin has good parenchymal penetration. Nitrofurantoin is often used in pregnant women, because the drug tends to concentrate locally in the urine.  However, blood and tissue concentrations are weak.  It may be ineffective if there is some sub-clinical upper tract involvement. Cefdinir is a 3rd generation cephalosporin available by mouth, given at 14 mg/kg in either one dose daily or divided BID, up to max of 600 mg.  This may be an option for an older child who has pyelonephritis, but is well enough to go home. Whom should we admit? The first thing to consider is age.  Any infant younger than 2 months should be admitted for a febrile UTI.  Their immune systems and physiologic reserve are just not sufficient to localize and fight off infections reliably. The truth is, for serious bacterial illness like pneumonia, UTI, or severe soft tissue infections, be careful with any infant less than 4-6 months of age. Of course, the unwell child – whatever his age – he should be admitted.  Think about poor feeding, irritability, dehydration – in that case, just go with your gut and call it pyelonephritis, and admit. What is the age cut-off for a urine culture? In adults, we think of urine culture only for high-risk populations, such as pregnant women, the immunocompromised, those with renal abnormalities, the neurologically impaired, or the critically ill, to name a few. In children, it’s a little simpler.  Do it for everyone. Who is everyone? Think of the urine rule of 10s: 10% of young febrile children will have a UTI 10% of UAs will show no evidence of pyuria Routine urine culture in all children with suspected or confirmed UTI up to about age 10 What do I do then with urine culture results? From a quality improvement and safety perspective, consider making this a regular assignment to a qualified clinician. Check once in 24-48 hours to find...
Просмотров: 55 Tim Horeczko
Management of Common Infections in Long-Term Care
 
48:36
Review of management of common infections, including urinary tract, upper respiratory tract, and skin and soft-tissue infections, in long-term care. This is a presentation delivered by Dr. Crnich at the Nebraska Antimicrobial Stewardship Summit held on June 1st, 2018.
Просмотров: 136 Nebraska ASAP
Addressing the Public Health Crisis of Hepatitis C in Louisiana
 
03:23:51
In response to a request from Secretary Rebekah Gee, Health Secretary for the State of Louisiana, faculty at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health convened a panel of national experts to discuss potential solutions to the hepatitis C crisis in the state. The panel met on April 17, 2017. Recommendations to Secretary Gee are under development.
Fosfomycin
 
04:58
Fosfomycin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic produced by certain Streptomyces species, although it can now be made by chemical synthesis. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Просмотров: 4665 Audiopedia
Antimicrobial Stewardship Implementation in Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Facilities
 
40:57
This presentation describes the need for antimicrobial stewardship in post-acute and long-term care settings and highlights practical approaches for program implementation. This talk was given by Dr. Ashraf during the Nebraska Antimicrobial Stewardship Summit on June 1st, 2018.
Просмотров: 32 Nebraska ASAP
Bacterial Uropathogens Isolated from Pediatric Patients
 
06:46
Medicine by Alexandros G. Sfakianakis,Anapafseos 5 Agios Nikolaos 72100 Crete Greece,00302841026182,00306932607174,alsfakia@gmail.com, https://plus.google.com/communities/1... , ,https://plus.google.com/u/0/+Alexandr... , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQH2... , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTRE... , https://twitter.com/g_orl?lang=el, https://www.instagram.com/alexandross..., Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacterial Uropathogens Isolated from Pediatric Patients at Yekatit 12 Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia via International Journal of Microbiology Background. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is considered as the most common bacterial infection seen among the pediatric patients. Objective. This study was carried out in order to determine the prevalence of urinary tract infection in pediatric patients, identify bacterial uropathogens responsible for the infection, and study the antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacterial isolates. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study designed and conducted from January to April 2014. Clean-voided midstream urine specimens were obtained from 384 pediatric patients less than or equal to 15 years in sterile universal bottles. Urine collected from each patient was inoculated onto CLED and blood agar plates using a calibrated inoculating loop with a capacity of 0.001 ml. Inoculated plates were incubated for 24–48 hours at 37°C at inverted position aerobically. Bacterial isolates were indentified and characterized by Gram stain and by using an array of standard routine biochemical tests. The antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out by using the Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion method. Frequency distribution tables were used to describe the findings. Logistical regression was also used to estimate crude odds ratio (COR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) of positive responses to the different variables, and values less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Result. In this study, a total of 384 patients (199 males and 185 females) aged less than or equal to 15 years from whom urine samples were collected were enrolled. Of these patients, 61 (15.9%) had significant bacteriuria. Of the 185 females, 36 (19.5%) came up with positive cultures, while 25 (12.6%) of the 199 males had significant bacteriuria, and the largest number of study subjects were below the age of 3 years, and the largest positive culture was obtained from this age group, accounting for 35 (57.4%.) out of 61 positive cultures. Bacterial species belonging to six genera were isolated and identified from 61 positive cultures, and the genera were Escherichia, Klebsiella, Staphylococcus, Proteus, Acinetobacter, and Enterococcus. E. coli was isolated in 28 cases (49.5 %), followed by Klebsiella spp. in 17 cases (27.9%), Staphylococcus spp. in 5 patients (8.2%.) (S. aureus in one and coagulase-negative staphylococci in 4 cases), Enterococcus in 7 cases (11.5%), Proteus spp. in 3 cases (4.9%), and Acinetobacter in one case (1.6%). Of the bacterial isolates, E. coli was found out to be the most common pathogen followed by Klebsiella spp. Furthermore, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogens in female patients accounting for 71.4% and 64.7%, respectively. Regarding susceptibility tests, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were not 100% susceptible to any of the 11 antibiotics tested. Acinetobacter spp. had 100% resistance to three antibiotics: gentamicin (GN), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXM), and augmentin (AMP). But they were 100% susceptible to ciprofloxacin (CIP), cefuroxime (CXM), norfloxacin (NOR), and ceftazidime (CAZ). On the contrary, Proteus spp. was 100% sensitive to all drugs except to nitrofurantoin. Species of Enterococcus had resistance of 71.4% to chloramphenicol (C) and 85.7% to both SXM and erythromycin. S. aureus was 100% susceptible to almost all drugs, while coagulase-negative staphylococci were not as susceptible as S. aureus. Multidrug resistance to two or more drugs was observed in 73.7% of the bacterial isolates. Conclusion. This study determined the prevalence of urinary tract infection in pediatric patients and highlighted the major bacterial uropathogens involved in UTI for the first time in the country. Furthermore, bacterial pathogen species and their frequency was consistent with the usually reported pattern, with E. coli being the most common organism isolated in cases of urinary tract infections followed by Klebsiella spp. Most of the bacterial isolates were multidrug resistant, and it is therefore suggested that appropriate antimicrobials should be administered to reduce the risk of multidrug resistant organisms developing and avert ineffectiveness of antibiotics. This condition indicates that antibiotic selection should be based on knowledge of the local prevalence of bacterial organisms and antibiotic sensitivities rather than empirical treatment. T
Ch 26 The Child with GU Dystunction
 
08:01
Просмотров: 44 Julie Hipkins
Peripheral neuropathy
 
20:10
Peripheral neuropathy is damage or disease affecting nerves, which may impair sensation, movement, gland or organ function, or other aspects of health, depending on the type of nerve affected. Common causes include systemic diseases , vitamin deficiency, medication , traumatic injury, excessive alcohol consumption, immune system disease, or infection, or it may be inherited . In conventional medical usage, the word neuropathy without modifier usually means peripheral neuropathy. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Просмотров: 876 encyclopediacc