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Memantine - Could This Pharmaceutical Drug Be Too Risky?
 
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READ MORE HERE: https://goo.gl/uk9AoJ The main memantine benefits are related to improving memory formation and learning (among healthy individuals) and reducing memory decline among those with Alzheimer’s disease and other memory related ailments. A 2003 study in the New England Journal of Medicine concluded that memantine successfully reduced deterioration of moderate and severe Alzheimer’s disease. Given this is one of the most prestigious journals in the world, it is meaningful that they concluded “other treatments are not available”. This was a relatively large study with 252 patients over 28 weeks. The memantine benefits come from the antiglutamatergic treatment specifically, which blocks NMDA receptors. This discovery wasn’t made until recently, however. The evidence in favor of using memantine for reducing cognitive decline is sufficient, though using the drug for cognitive enhancement purposes is another story. While there is some evidence on similar drugs (like donepezil), they don’t correlate directly with memantine. Other benefits of memantine include: -Dementia -Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) -Generalized anxiety disorder -Addiction therapy -ADHD All of these benefits have received far less academic attention than the Alzheimer’s disease and senile dementia research. While these promising studies have prompted community members and nootropics enthusiasts to try the drug themselves, the benefits aren’t set in stone. Memantine and ADHD One of the memantine benefits is for ADHD patients. There are over 11% of U.S. children who are diagnosed with ADHD and given amphetamine based drugs. Millions of children (and adults) are taking these drugs and while life-saving at times, there are plenty who seek alternatives to Adderall. When a possible treatment for ADHD pops up as a nootropic, it’s worth looking into. According to much of the anecdotal and scientific reports, this might be a useful alternative. A 2013 study concluded that memantine demonstrated beneficial effects in childhood disorders. They also aptly concluded that there was too little evidence to advocate for regular use of the drug, but they did note that off-label use was the only way to see benefits until further studies were completed. The off-label use seems to be going well for many, however. In one anecdotal report, a Redditor noted: “I was diagnosed with ADHD at a young age and I’ve been on stimulants for it for most of my life – mostly Concerta (extended-release methylphenidate). The stimulants helped me focus, but I still procrastinated like crazy and the side effects made me feel like a zombie. A few years ago I decided to stop taking stimulants and search for a more sustainable solution. I think I’ve finally found that solution in Memantine… …I can focus better, it’s easier to motivate myself to get things done, and I’m procrastinating much less than I used to. I’ve been much more productive at my job and around the house. Best of all, I’ve had absolutely no side effects other than a bit of dissociation and brain fog for the first week after increasing my dosage to 10mg (and even that could probably have been avoided if I had titrated more slowly.)…” – blindcolumn
Просмотров: 2162 Nootropedia
This Doctor Says if You're On This Medication, Stop Taking it Immediately!
 
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Find out why Dr. Peter Glidden says this about two medications in this video. He also discusses the role of cholesterol and how current MDs are misguided in their thinking of cholesterol and cholesterol lowering drugs. Dr. Glidden also illustrates the danger of increased use of statin drugs and why certain conditions are also on the rise. http://www.ihealthtube.com
Просмотров: 589152 iHealthTube.com
My 'smart drugs' nightmare - BBC News
 
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So-called "smart drugs" are drugs that can supposedly enhance your cognitive abilities. People all over the world are taking them in universities, offices and the comfort of their own home - to get ahead of the game. One drug, Modafinil - is amongst the most popular. It was labelled in August 2015 as the world’s first “safe” smart drug - off the back of research from Harvard and Oxford University. But is this true? And do “smart drugs" actually work? In this film, our reporter Benjamin Zand tries a drug himself - as he takes a first-hand look inside the world of so-called smart drugs. Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews
Просмотров: 1833898 BBC News
A List of Common Dementia Medications
 
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A List of Common Dementia Medications. Introduction:. Dementia is a term that describes a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory or other thinking skills. This decline is severe enough to make you less able to perform everyday activities. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Other common types include Lewy body dementia, Parkinson's dementia, and vascular dementia. There is no known cure for any type of dementia, and medications can’t prevent the condition or reverse the brain damage it causes. However, various drugs can provide some symptom relief. Read on to learn what these drugs may do to ease dementia symptoms for you or your loved one. Types of dementia medications:. Several prescription medications are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat symptoms of dementia caused by AD. These drugs can provide short-term relief of cognitive (thought-related) dementia symptoms, and some can also help slow the progression of AD-related dementia. While these drugs are approved to treat symptoms of AD, they’re not approved to treat symptoms of other types of dementia. However, researchers are exploring off-label uses of these medications for people with non-AD dementias. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, research suggests that some AD medications may benefit people with vascular dementias and Parkinson's dementia. Some of the most commonly prescribed medications used to treat symptoms of AD are cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine. Cholinesterase inhibitors:. Cholinesterase inhibitors work by increasing a chemical in your brain called acetylcholine that aids in memory and judgment. Increasing the amount of acetylcholine in your brain may delay dementia-related symptoms. It may also prevent them from worsening. The more common side effects of cholinesterase inhibitors include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dizziness. Examples of commonly prescribed cholinesterase inhibitors are:. Donepezil (Aricept):. Donepezil is approved to delay or slow the symptoms of mild, moderate, and severe AD. It may be used off-label to help reduce behavioral symptoms in some people with thought problems following a stroke, Lewy body dementia, and vascular dementia. Donepezil comes as a tablet and a disintegrating tablet. Galantamine (Razadyne):. Galantamine is approved to prevent or slow the symptoms of mild to moderate AD. It may be used off-label to help provide the same benefit for people with vascular dementia or Lewy body dementia. Galantamine comes as a tablet, extended-release capsule, and an oral solution. Rivastigmine (Exelon):. Rivastigmine (Exelon) is approved to prevent or slow the symptoms of mild to moderate AD or mild to moderate Parkinson's dementia. It comes as a capsule or patch. Memantine:. Memantine is used mainly to delay increasing cognitive and behavioral symptoms from moderate to severe AD. This effect may allow people with AD to function more normally for a longer time. Memantine may be used off-label to provide the same benefit for people with vascular dementia. Memantine is not a cholinesterase inhibitor, but it also acts on chemicals in the brain. What’s more, memantine is often prescribed in combination with a cholinesterase inhibitor. An example of this combination is Namzaric, a medication that combines extended-release memantine with donepezil. Memantine comes as a tablet, an extended-release capsule, and an oral solution. Its more common side effects include:. *headache. *high blood pressure. *diarrhea. *constipation. *dizziness. *confusion. *cough. *infection with the flu. Effectiveness:. How effective a dementia drug is varies by drug. For all of these drugs, however, the effectiveness tends to reduce over time. Talk with your doctor:. While there is no cure for dementia, several prescription medications can help slow the progression of the cognitive effects and other symptoms that dementia can cause. If you or a loved one has dementia, talk to your doctor about all of your treatment options. Be sure to ask any questions you have, such as:. *What type of dementia is it?. *Which medications will you prescribe?. *What results should I expect from this medication?. *What other treatments are available?. *How long should I expect this medication to help?. All Photos Licensed Under CC Source : www.pexels.com www.pixabay.com www.commons.wikimedia.org
Просмотров: 447 Natural Remedy Tips
Give Yourself A Brain Boost With Life-Enhancing Drugs
 
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Catalyst: Life Enhancing Drugs - Exploring the possibility of 'brain doping' to improve mental performance. Subscribe to Journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures Go to the Journeyman Science playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlGSlkijht5iXbPX7d_oTP47c9C3kArQ0 Would you take a pill that could improve your concentration, learning ability, energy levels, memory, sociability, or mood? Drugs such as Prozac have already been enhancing certain brain functions for many years now, but scientists are now inquiring into the wider development of drugs that could boost performance in a huge variety of aspects in our lives. Possible drugs could be used to treat medical conditions, but also just as quick fixes for our undiagnosed problems or anxieties. Aside from the clinical trials, we also need to address the moral questions of how altering our pharmacological state could alter who we are as human beings. Dr Graham Phillips explores how we could be seeing more pharmacological fixes to improve brainpower. ABC Australia - Ref 6284 Journeyman Pictures brings you highlights from the cutting-edge science series, ‘Catalyst’, produced by our long-term content partners at ABC Australia. Every day we’ll upload a new episode that takes you to the heart of the most intriguing and relevant science-related stories of the day, transforming your perspective of the issues shaping our world.
Просмотров: 40296 Journeyman Pictures
Learn Donepezil Faster with Picmonic (USMLE, Step 1, Step 2 CK)
 
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Learn Donepezil faster using the Picmonic Learning System! TRY PICMONIC FOR FREE ► https://www.picmonic.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_term=1481129329&utm_content=video_link&utm_campaign=youtubemedicinepicmonicwalkthroughs_2016 ————————————————— Picmonic turns the information you need to know in medical and nursing school into unforgettable images and stories that are scientifically proven to increase memory retention! Join over 125,000 medical and nursing students using Picmonic’s Visual Learning Community to study and learn more effectively in less time. Picmonic is research proven to increase test scores by 50% and long-term memory retention by 331%. Picmonic for Medicine has you covered for USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK, with subject including Pathology, Pharmacology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Psychiatry, Anatomy, Physiology, Epidemiology, and more! Picmonic for Nursing has you covered for your classes and the NCLEX® with subjects including Fundamentals, Pharmacology, Med-Surg, Anatomy, Physiology, Pediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatric, and more! ————————————————— LET’S CONNECT! General Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonic Nursing Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonicfornursing Twitter ► https://twitter.com/picmonic Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/picmonic/ Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/picmonic/ LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/2703135 Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+Picmonic/posts —————————————————
Просмотров: 6347 PicmonicVideo
Real Life 'Limitless' drug? (NOT Modafinil)
 
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So is Valproate like a real life version of Limitless? Not quite. But it's an interesting start for those of us looking to force our brains to work overtime. LINKS & SOURCES: http://www.frontiersin.org/Systems_Neuroscience/10.3389/fnsys.2013.00102/full http://theweek.com/article/index/254721/this-pill-could-give-your-brain-the-learning-powers-of-a-7-year-old
Просмотров: 128737 ThePromisedWLAN
Dementia drugs have 'modest impact'
 
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Professor Clive Ballard, Director of Research at the Alzheimer's Society, says anti-psychotic drugs given to dementia patients only benefit one in 15. Follow us on twitter at http://twitter.com/itn_news
Просмотров: 730 ODN
Dangerous Weight Loss Linked to Common Dementia Meds
 
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www.dailyrxnews.com It's probably not your imagination that Grandma is becoming increasingly fragile over time. And her dementia medication may be partly to blame. A new study from the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) found that a class medications commonly used to treat dementia — called cholinesterase inhibitors — may cause harmful weight loss in some patients. These medications include donepezil (brand name Aricept), galantamine (Razadyne) and rivastigmine (Exelon). "This is very relevant to patient care because unintentional weight loss in older adults is associated with many adverse outcomes, including increased rates of institutionalization and mortality, a decline in functional status, and poorer quality of life," said lead study author Meera Sheffrin, MD, a geriatrics fellow at UCSF School of Medicine, in a press release.
Просмотров: 308 dailyRx
Remember These 6 Myths About Alzheimer’s Disease
 
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Remember These 6 Myths About Alzheimer’s Disease 1. Memory Loss is Normal During Aging The Alzheimer’s Association says it’s normal for people to have “occasional memory problems” as they age, but it can be limited to something minor like forgetting a name they just learned. But the memory loss associated with aging and Alzheimer’s are completely different, notes the source. “Alzheimer’s is more than occasional memory loss. It’s a disease that causes brain cells to malfunction and ultimately die,” it explains. A patient with the disease will forget how to get home along a route they’re taken hundreds of times, or forget the name of a close family member. 2. Only the Elderly Get Alzheimer’s While it’s true that the majority of patients with Alzheimer’s are aged 65-and older, it can occur at a younger age as well, according to WebMD. In fact, the source notes about 5-percent of patients get the disease between their 30’s and 50’s, which is called early-onset Alzheimer’s. Those who get the disease in midlife may not be diagnosed as quickly because doctors don’t expect it as much in middle-aged patients, notes the source, adding doctors commonly associate memory loss with stress earlier in life. The risk of developing early-onset Alzheimer’s may have genetic links, it adds. 3. Alzheimer’s Isn’t Fatal Some people may think that Alzheimer’s is not a death sentence, but sadly that’s not the case, according to AlzheimersNewsToday.com. Because the disease kills off brain cells that control bodily functions, the patient will eventually lose the ability to eat and breathe, it explains. However, some patients live up to 10-years following a diagnosis – although many patients end up in long-term care because of their increasing needs and dependency, and their quality of life following a diagnosis can be very limited. 4. Aluminum Exposure Causes Alzheimer’s The Alzheimer Society of Canada says that studies have not proven there is any link between being in contact with aluminum and raising your risk for dementia. The truth is that aluminum is a naturally occurring trace element in the environment and your body, it adds. There has been a lot of discussion about drinking from aluminum cans or eating from aluminum pots causing Alzheimer’s. However, the society says some studies have shown increased levels of aluminum in the brains of dementia patients, while other studies have not. The myth seems to have originated from “studies focused on one animal that is particularly susceptible to aluminum poisoning, which has led to incorrect conclusions,” it adds. 5. There are No Treatments While there is no cure and some sources say medications are not helpful, others say the contrary. For example, the NHS in the UK explains there is medication available that can “temporarily” reduce symptoms, while in some patients it can actually slow the progression. The source explains that drugs called donepezil, galantamine and rivastigmine can be given to patients in the early or mid-stages of the disease, although like any medications, they can have side effects. However, there are other non-drug approaches such as enlisting the help of an occupational therapist to lessen barriers from the disease and using cognitive stimulation to improve memory, it adds. 6. It’s Not Preventable Although there are many factors including family history that can come into play with Alzheimer’s, about 33-percent of cases are preventable, WebMD said in 2014. The health site was citing research from the University of Cambridge, England that identified 7-risk factors in developing the disease. These factors include a lack of physical activity, diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity in middle age, depression, smoking, and low education. Somewhat surprisingly, low education has been identified as the “main risk factor” worldwide, following by smoking and lack of exercise, adds the source. Help us to be better SUBSCRIBE for more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBKaaYvjeWaaOjNQyIfBCSw?sub_confirmation=1 More from Natural Cures: -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGCeGG_rO4o -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zze_sUJbnEk -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jmZ6u_yy3s Backsound Free Royalty Licence by
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What are the side effects of the drug amiodarone
 
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What are the side effects of the drug amiodarone - Find out more explanation for : 'What are the side effects of the drug amiodarone' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Просмотров: 61 theaiueo7 theaiueo7
Remember These 6 Myths About Alzheimer’s Disease
 
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Remember These 6 Myths About Alzheimer’s Disease 1. Memory Loss is Normal During Aging The Alzheimer’s Association says it’s normal for people to have “occasional memory problems” as they age, but it can be limited to something minor like forgetting a name they just learned. But the memory loss associated with aging and Alzheimer’s are completely different, notes the source. “Alzheimer’s is more than occasional memory loss. It’s a disease that causes brain cells to malfunction and ultimately die,” it explains. A patient with the disease will forget how to get home along a route they’re taken hundreds of times, or forget the name of a close family member. 2. Only the Elderly Get Alzheimer’s While it’s true that the majority of patients with Alzheimer’s are aged 65-and older, it can occur at a younger age as well, according to WebMD. In fact, the source notes about 5-percent of patients get the disease between their 30’s and 50’s, which is called early-onset Alzheimer’s. Those who get the disease in midlife may not be diagnosed as quickly because doctors don’t expect it as much in middle-aged patients, notes the source, adding doctors commonly associate memory loss with stress earlier in life. The risk of developing early-onset Alzheimer’s may have genetic links, it adds. 3. Alzheimer’s Isn’t Fatal Some people may think that Alzheimer’s is not a death sentence, but sadly that’s not the case, according to AlzheimersNewsToday.com. Because the disease kills off brain cells that control bodily functions, the patient will eventually lose the ability to eat and breathe, it explains. However, some patients live up to 10-years following a diagnosis – although many patients end up in long-term care because of their increasing needs and dependency, and their quality of life following a diagnosis can be very limited. 4. Aluminum Exposure Causes Alzheimer’s The Alzheimer Society of Canada says that studies have not proven there is any link between being in contact with aluminum and raising your risk for dementia. The truth is that aluminum is a naturally occurring trace element in the environment and your body, it adds. There has been a lot of discussion about drinking from aluminum cans or eating from aluminum pots causing Alzheimer’s. However, the society says some studies have shown increased levels of aluminum in the brains of dementia patients, while other studies have not. The myth seems to have originated from “studies focused on one animal that is particularly susceptible to aluminum poisoning, which has led to incorrect conclusions,” it adds. 5. There are No Treatments While there is no cure and some sources say medications are not helpful, others say the contrary. For example, the NHS in the UK explains there is medication available that can “temporarily” reduce symptoms, while in some patients it can actually slow the progression. The source explains that drugs called donepezil, galantamine and rivastigmine can be given to patients in the early or mid-stages of the disease, although like any medications, they can have side effects. However, there are other non-drug approaches such as enlisting the help of an occupational therapist to lessen barriers from the disease and using cognitive stimulation to improve memory, it adds. 6. It’s Not Preventable Although there are many factors including family history that can come into play with Alzheimer’s, about 33-percent of cases are preventable, WebMD said in 2014. The health site was citing research from the University of Cambridge, England that identified 7-risk factors in developing the disease. These factors include a lack of physical activity, diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity in middle age, depression, smoking, and low education. Somewhat surprisingly, low education has been identified as the “main risk factor” worldwide, following by smoking and lack of exercise, adds the source. Like, Comment, Subscribe and invite all your friends to see our videos. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfR3Y90G-fFDYI6i7E7xPBQ
Просмотров: 11 HEALTH ZONE
Benazepril HCL 20 mg Dosage Cough and Side Effects
 
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Uses for Benazepril HCL. Cough and other side effects. Dosage of 5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg and 40 mg are discussed
Просмотров: 529 Pharmacist Tips
Medication and MCI: Less can be more
 
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If you’ve been diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, one of the first things your doctor probably told you is that there are no medications approved for the treatment of MCI. But people want a pill. They ask about Alzheimer’s medications that a doctor may prescribe “off-label.” They ask about all sorts supplements and “medical foods” that can be taken in tablet form. Yet here’s something most people never even consider. Your doctor may actually be able to do more good for your brain by helping get you off a pill you’re already taking than by putting you on more pills. Learn more in today’s video. Visit the Go Cogno website: https://gocogno.com/ Read my full article on polypharmacy here: http://www.nj.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2017/03/taking_too_many_drugs_poses_danger_for_older_adult.html Read my article on other causes of MCI here: https://gocogno.com/mild-cognitive-impairment-causes/ See the Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults here: http://www.healthinaging.org/medications-older-adults/ Here is a partial text of today's video: My son decided to major in math in college. So when he went to the summer orientation, he found the table where the math professor was sitting, and he asked, “What math classes can I take?” And the professor just started laughing. And he said, “I’ve been sitting here all summer, and you are the first who has ever asked me the question. All the students ever want to know is, ‘How can I get out of taking math?’” I tell that story because it reminds me of something that I see a lot in the world of brain health. There is a question people ask me all the time, and then there’s one question that no one has ever asked me. And yet the answer to the question that no one ever asks is one of the best possible things we can do for brain health. Hi, I’m Tony Dearing of GoCogno.com, the web site for people with mild cognitive impairment. I’m not a doctor, and I don’t pretend to dispense medical advice, and I always make that very clear to people. And yet, they ask me anyway. They want to know, “Well, what about off-label medications my doctor may be able to prescribe to me? What about Aricept? What about some of these others?” They ask me about so-called medical foods that be taken in tablet form. What they really want to know is, what pill can my doctor give me to make my mind work better? Yet what no one has ever asked me is, what pill can my doctor stop giving me to make mind work better? Based on what we know right now, your doctor may actually be able to do you more good by helping get you off a pill you’re already taking, than to put you on more pills. We have a drug problem, and one that’s reaching epidemic proportions. It’s called polypharmacy. Polypharmacy is a term that describes “the simultaneous use of multiple drugs by a single patient, for one or more conditions.” You see this suitcase? I was talking to one of the leading neurologists in America, and he told me that the first time he sees a new patient either for mild cognitive impairment or for dementia, he tells them to bring in all the medications they’re currently taking, including over the counter medications, vitamins and supplements. And he told me it’s very common for people to have so many pill bottles they have to bring them in in a suitcase. Last year, I did a piece on the 12 most common causes of mild cognitive impairment other than dementia, and I put this one right at the top of the list depression. Taking medication is not bad, and taking multiple medications is not bad, as long as all the medications you’re taking have been reviewed by a medical professional — ideally a gerontologist — to make sure individually and together, they’re all still appropriate for you. Unfortunately, that’s often not the case. It may be that a drug prescribed years ago is no longer appropriate for you. Drugs also affect us differently as we age. So a drug you took without any problem when you were younger can start having side effects that impact cognition as you get older. And then there are certain combinations of drugs that are notorious for reacting badly with each other. For that, there’s a really helpful resources you should be aware of. It’s called the Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults. Now once again, let me say, I’m not trying to steer you away from medication. I’m just saying, always ask both sides of the question. There are things out there that may help you. But there may be something you’re on right now that’s doing your brain more harm than good, and if you can be weaned off of that safely and gradually, under the care of your doctor, it could benefit your cognition. This site is educational, and is not intended as medical advice. It offers information about lifestyle choices that have been proven to help protect cognition. Always consult your doctor before making changes that can impact your health.
Просмотров: 104 GoCogno.com
Memantine (Namenda) : Meds Made Easy (MME)
 
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Video Terms & Conditions - Waiver and Release of Liability All viewers of this video recognize and acknowledge that all content presented in this video is solely for educational purposes. All viewers acknowledge and agree that if any methods, techniques or protocols learned in the video is used or implemented, it is done so appropriately, with individual discretion, for its intended purposes, and only after such individual receives guidance and advice from a professional practitioner that has evaluated and considered such individual’s situation and circumstances personally. Any methods, techniques or protocols presented in this video may have inherent risks when is individually used or implemented. Any viewer who uses or implements any learned methods, techniques or protocols found in this video recognizes such risks and acknowledge professional liabilities may result from individual use or implementation of learned methods, techniques or protocols. All viewers should be aware of the potential risks, including, but not limited to, death or permanent medical illness, that can occur by individual use or implementation of the methods, techniques or protocols presented in this video. All viewers agree that Vempak Group, LLC and/or any affiliated businesses or persons do not have any legal obligations or duties to the actions performed by any viewer after viewing this video. All viewers consent to release Vempak Group, LLC and/or any affiliated businesses or persons of all liabilities and obligations associated and related to any adverse actions or professional liability incurred as a result of using or implementing the methods, techniques or protocols learned in this video.
Просмотров: 1677 Collaborative Pharmacy Group
Celebrex Is the Drug for You!
 
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Jaime Wright and Marissa Gruesbeck
Land Rover Discovery 5 Problems
 
03:08
This video is about LR Discovery 5
Просмотров: 26903 Stu Hutton
Dementia - Causes, Sign & symptoms, Treatment, Prevention || Alzheimer's by Dr. Aliya Azmi
 
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In this video I'll explain you about Dementia is a broad category of brain diseases that cause a long term and often gradual decrease in the ability to think and remember that is great enough to affect a person's daily functioning.[2] Other common symptoms include emotional problems, problems with language, and a decrease in motivation.[2][3] A person's consciousness is usually not affected.[2] A dementia diagnosis requires a change from a person's usual mental functioning and a greater decline than one would expect due to aging.[2][11] These diseases also have a significant effect on a person's caregivers.[2] The most common type of dementia is Alzheimer's disease, which makes up 50% to 70% of cases.[2][3] Other common types include vascular dementia (25%), Lewy body dementia (15%), and frontotemporal dementia.[2][3] Less common causes include normal pressure hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, syphilis, and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease among others.[12] More than one type of dementia may exist in the same person.[2] A small proportion of cases run in families.[13] In the DSM-5, dementia was reclassified as a neurocognitive disorder, with various degrees of severity.[14] Diagnosis is usually based on history of the illness and cognitive testing with medical imaging and blood work used to rule out other possible causes.[4] The mini mental state examination is one commonly used cognitive test.[3] Efforts to prevent dementia include trying to decrease risk factors such as high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, and obesity.[2] Screening the general population for the disorder is not recommended.[15] There is no cure for dementia.[2] Cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil are often used and may be beneficial in mild to moderate disorder.[16][17][7] Overall benefit, however, may be minor.[7][8] There are many measures that can improve the quality of life of people with dementia and their caregivers.[2] Cognitive and behavioral interventions may be appropriate.[2] Educating and providing emotional support to the caregiver is important.[2] Exercise programs may be beneficial with respect to activities of daily living and potentially improve outcomes.[18] Treatment of behavioral problems with antipsychotics is common but not usually recommended due to the little benefit and side effects, including an increased risk of death.[19][20] Globally, dementia affected about 46 million people in 2015.[9] About 10% of people develop the disorder at some point in their lives.[13] It becomes more common with age.[21] About 3% of people between the ages of 65–74 have dementia, 19% between 75 and 84 and nearly half of those over 85 years of age.[22] In 2013 dementia resulted in about 1.7 million deaths up from 0.8 million in 1990.[23] As more people are living longer, dementia is becoming more common in the population as a whole.[21] For people of a specific age, however, it may be becoming less frequent, at least in the developed world, due to a decrease in risk factors.[21] It is one of the most common causes of disability among the old.[3] It is believed to result in economic costs of 604 billion USD a year.[2] People with dementia are often physically or chemically restrained to a greater degree than necessary, raising issues of human rights.[2] Social stigma against those affected is common. LIKE SHARE COMMENT DOWN BELOW Don;t Forget to SUBSCRIBE
Просмотров: 186 Diseases & its Pathology
Piracetam: Smart Drug or Snake Oil?
 
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Просмотров: 3259 Sons of Apollo
What are the side effects of Zyrtec
 
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What are the side effects of Zyrtec - Find out more explanation for : 'What are the side effects of Zyrtec' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Просмотров: 133 atunakai10b
What are the side effects of Sumatriptan
 
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What are the side effects of Sumatriptan - Find out more explanation for : 'What are the side effects of Sumatriptan' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Просмотров: 82 atunakai9c
Korean researchers find cause of memory loss in Alzheimer's
 
02:23
Scientists around the world have tried and failed to find a cure for Alzheimer's disease since its discovery in 1906. But now, a Korean research team has identified the cause of memory loss from this most common form of dementia, which could open up gateways to treatment of the fatal brain disease. Kwon Soa explains. In a scene from the Korean movie "A Moment to Remember," a young woman suffering from Alzheimer's disease can't find her way home. Like her, the memory loss caused by the gradual damage of brain cells can often cause people to lose their way. In fact, in Korea, around 7,600 elderly people with Alzheimer's have been reported missing yearly. The disease is not only fatal, but incurable. But now, a Korean research team has discovered the source of what leads to the loss of memory in Alzheimer's, which is raising hopes of opening a new chapter in the development of treatments. The cause of the impairment, researchers say, lies in the so-called reactive astrocytes that develop once the brain is affected by the disease. Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the brain, and reactive astrocytes produce an acid called gamma-Aminobutyric, or GABA. They found that these acids in affected mice began to produce abnormally large amounts of GABA, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter. An experiment showed that mice that were injected with an inhibitor called Selegiline, which suppresses the generation of GABA, regained their memories. However, after more than two weeks during which the injections were administered, the effects disappeared,... which calls for the next step in the research process. "We've found that the effects of Selegiline grow weaker when it is taken in for a long time. We are currently working on the development of three kinds of MAO-B inhibitors with long-lasting efficacy." The research, supported by the Korea Institute of Science and Technology, has been published in the highly cited medical journal Nature Medicine. Kwon Soa, Arirang News.
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When Anti-Psychotic Medications are Appropriate
 
01:00:14
2016-10-19 11.59 When anti-psychotic medications are appropriate
Просмотров: 466 ORGovDHS
ALZHEIMER'S DRUGS PHASE 3
 
02:00
http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com ALZHEIMER'S ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com Although current medications cannot cure Alzheimer's or stop it from progressing, they may help lessen symptoms, such as memory loss and confusion, for a limited time. Types of drugs.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two types of medications — cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Exelon, Razadyne, Cognex) and memantine (Namenda) — to treat the cognitive symptoms (memory loss, confusion, and problems with thinking and reasoning) of Alzheimer's disease. As Alzheimer's progresses, brain cells die and connections among cells are lost, causing cognitive symptoms to worsen. While current medications cannot stop the damage Alzheimer's causes to brain cells, they may help lessen or stabilize symptoms for a limited time by affecting certain chemicals involved in carrying messages among the brain's nerve cells. Doctors sometimes prescribe both types of medications together. Some doctors also prescribe high doses of vitamin E for cognitive changes of Alzheimer's disease. All of the prescription medications currently approved to treat Alzheimer's symptoms in early to moderate stages are from a class of drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors. Cholinesterase inhibitors are prescribed to treat symptoms related to memory, thinking, language, judgment and other thought processes. Cholinesterase inhibitors: Prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine (a-SEA-til-KOH-lean), a chemical messenger important for learning and memory. This supports communication among nerve cells by keeping acetylcholine levels high. Delay worsening of symptoms for 6 to 12 months, on average, for about half the people who take them. Are generally well tolerated. Three cholinesterase inhibitors are commonly prescribed: Donepezil (Aricept) is approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's. Rivastigmine (Exelon) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. Galantamine (Razadyne) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. A second type of medication, memantine (Namenda) is approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's. Memantine is prescribed to improve memory, attention, reason, language and the ability to perform simple tasks. It can be used alone or with other Alzheimer's disease treatments. There is some evidence that individuals with moderate to severe Alzheimer's who are taking a cholinesterase inhibitor might benefit by also taking memantine. Donepezil (Aricept) is the only cholinesterase inhibitor approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's disease, including moderate to severe. Memantine: Regulates the activity of glutamate, a different messenger chemical involved in learning and memory. Delays worsening of symptoms for some people temporarily. Many experts consider its benefits similar to those of cholinesterase inhibitors.
Просмотров: 74 Anand Krish
What Are The Side Effects Of Opioid Analgesia?
 
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Adverse effects of opioids medscape. Includes opioid analgesics (systemic) side effects, interactions and indications with the exception of constipation, many patients often develop tolerance to most analgesic related effectswhile practitioners express ability benefits outweigh treatment adverse events. Adverse effects of opioid analgesic drugs oxford academicinformation about pain relievers. What are the side effects of pain medications? Rxlist. Opioid complications and side effects. Adverse effects are probably comparative to codeine or dihydrocodeine 25 nov 2015 opioids (narcotics), such as avinza, kadian, ms contin (morphine), oxycontin (oxycodone), side of analgesics may include opioid do not cause any specific organ toxicity, unlike use is associated with increased adverse 3 oct 2016 narcotic pain medications and prescription drugs used moderate severe. Side effects of opioid analgesics medscape. Narcotic analgesics (opioids) breastcancer. Opioid complications and side effectsopioid (narcotic) pain medications dosage, effects, moremanagement of common opioid induced adverse effects gastrointestinal analgesics us pharmacist. Common side effects like include 4 jun 2013 narcotic analgesics (opioids) some combine an opioid with aspirin, less common dizziness (systemic) drug information from drugs. Opioid side effects in patients with chronic pain may impair quality of life, increase identify common opioid induced experienced by cancer you can do this adding a nonopioid co analgesic or adjuvant 27 apr 2016 what are the strongest medications? analgesics, general, relieving medicationsOpioid complications and effectsopioid (narcotic) medications dosage, effects, moremanagement adverse gastrointestinal analgesics us pharmacist. Analgesic side effects & precautions narcotic pain meds list, names, definition, uses. Adverse effects of opioid analgesic drugsduthie and wan 'opioid' is a drug with morphine like actions 23 sep 2016 analgesics are prescribed for moderate to severe pain. Opioid side effects news medical. Opioid analgesics british national formulary nice evidence. Opioid analgesics & pain management opioid administration issues, side effect of induced effects (slides with transcript). Ncbi common side effects of opioid administration include sedation, dizziness, opioids can be considered broad spectrum analgesic agents, affecting a wide 30 apr 2017 webmd explains opioids, powerful painkillers, and how to use them safely have many possible adverse effects; Some are common, some not sedated or mentally clouded immediately after beginning an 15 oct 2006 analgesics useful agents for treating pain various etiologies; However, potential limitations their 19 dec 2012 several treatment options exist help manage these effects, but prevention is the key component patients taking 13 2013 most commonly used relief while seen with initial therapy short term, may last 1. The most serious side effect of opiate use is constipation. Opioid analgesics (sys
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Quillivant XR Uses and Side Effects
 
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Quillivant (Methylphenidate) is a prescription medication used to treat Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). http://www.rxwiki.com/methylphenidate
Просмотров: 1094 RxWikiTV
Coconut Oil As an Alzheimer's Treatment - Dr. Mary Newport
 
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Help support iHealthTube.com at http://www.patreon.com/ihealthtube Dr. Mary Newport discovered the benefits of using coconut oil to treat her husband's Alzheimer's Disease. She discusses how quickly the coconut oil showed improvements in her husband's condition and what kind of changes happened when the coconut oil wasn't administered. Dr. Newport has found that the coconut ketones from coconut oil have been very beneficial in the treatment of Alzheimer's.
Просмотров: 354328 iHealthTube.com
ALZHEIMER'S DRUGS AIM TO CHANGE COURSE OF DISEASE
 
02:43
http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com ALZHEIMER'S ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com Although current medications cannot cure Alzheimer's or stop it from progressing, they may help lessen symptoms, such as memory loss and confusion, for a limited time. Types of drugs.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two types of medications — cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Exelon, Razadyne, Cognex) and memantine (Namenda) — to treat the cognitive symptoms (memory loss, confusion, and problems with thinking and reasoning) of Alzheimer's disease. As Alzheimer's progresses, brain cells die and connections among cells are lost, causing cognitive symptoms to worsen. While current medications cannot stop the damage Alzheimer's causes to brain cells, they may help lessen or stabilize symptoms for a limited time by affecting certain chemicals involved in carrying messages among the brain's nerve cells. Doctors sometimes prescribe both types of medications together. Some doctors also prescribe high doses of vitamin E for cognitive changes of Alzheimer's disease. All of the prescription medications currently approved to treat Alzheimer's symptoms in early to moderate stages are from a class of drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors. Cholinesterase inhibitors are prescribed to treat symptoms related to memory, thinking, language, judgment and other thought processes. Cholinesterase inhibitors: Prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine (a-SEA-til-KOH-lean), a chemical messenger important for learning and memory. This supports communication among nerve cells by keeping acetylcholine levels high. Delay worsening of symptoms for 6 to 12 months, on average, for about half the people who take them. Are generally well tolerated. Three cholinesterase inhibitors are commonly prescribed: Donepezil (Aricept) is approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's. Rivastigmine (Exelon) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. Galantamine (Razadyne) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. A second type of medication, memantine (Namenda) is approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's. Memantine is prescribed to improve memory, attention, reason, language and the ability to perform simple tasks. It can be used alone or with other Alzheimer's disease treatments. There is some evidence that individuals with moderate to severe Alzheimer's who are taking a cholinesterase inhibitor might benefit by also taking memantine. Donepezil (Aricept) is the only cholinesterase inhibitor approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's disease, including moderate to severe. Memantine: Regulates the activity of glutamate, a different messenger chemical involved in learning and memory. Delays worsening of symptoms for some people temporarily. Many experts consider its benefits similar to those of cholinesterase inhibitors.
Просмотров: 105 Anand Krish
Pharmacology - CHOLINERGIC DRUGS (MADE EASY)
 
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Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/speedpharmacology Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SpeedPharmacology/ Get Speed Pharmacology Merch Here: https://teespring.com/stores/speed-pharmacology **************************************************************************************************** Topics covered include: mechanism of action of cholinergic agonists, cholinergic receptors; muscarinic & nicotinic, direct-acting cholinergic agonists, indirect-acting cholinergic agonists reversible & irreversible, cholinergic toxicity & adverse effects. Cholinergic agents mentioned include: Acetylcholine, Carbachol, Pilocarpine, Bethanechol, Edrophonium, Physostigmine, Neostigmine, Pyridostigmine, Donepezil, Rivastigmine, Galantamine, Echothiophate
Просмотров: 416560 Speed Pharmacology
Know Where Your Legislator Stands on Medical Cannabis
 
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Medical cannabis is effective for treating a number of debilitating conditions. States with access to medical cannabis show a 25% drop in opioid overdose mortality rates. However, medical cannabis is not legal for virtually all Texans; approximately .005 percent of Texans could qualify for access under the current Texas law. Only one condition is served by the Texas Compassionate Use program, which also limits the plant’s therapeutic value and how specialists are allowed to prescribe to patients. You can find out more about the limited cannabis medical program in Texas here - https://www.informedtexas.org/compassionate-use-program/ Find out who your Texas State Senator and Texas State Representatives are here - http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us/Home.aspx Condition Resources: PTSD - Cannabis is associated with reductions in PTSD symptoms in some patients. Greater than 75% reduction in CAPS symptom scores were reported when patients were using cannabis compared to when they were not. - George R. Greer, Charles S. Grob, Adam L. Halberstadt. “PTSD Symptom Reports of Patients Evaluated for the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program”. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 2014; 46 (1): 73 Cancer - All cancer or anti-cancer treatment-related symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, mood disorders, fatigue, weight loss, anorexia, constipation, sexual function, sleep disorders, itching, and pain had significant improvement. The symptom score (symptomatic relief) was improved in 32.1%. - Bar-Sela, Vorobeichik, Drawsheh, Omer, Goldberg, and Muller. “The Medical Necessity for Medicinal Cannabis: Prospective, Observational Study Evaluating the Treatment in Cancer Patients on Supportive or Palliative Care”. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2013 Chronic Pain - This study suggests that many CP patients are essentially substituting medical cannabis for opioids and other medications for CP treatment, and finding the benefit and side effect profile of cannabis to be greater than these other classes of medications. - Boehnke, Litinas, and Clauw. “Medical Cannabis Use Is Associated With Decreased Opiate Medication Use in a Retrospective Cross-Sectional Survey of Patients With Chronic Pain”. Journal of Pain, 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease - This study demonstrated the THC molecule can directly impact Alzheimer's disease pathology. It is noteworthy that THC is a considerably more effective inhibitor of AChE-induced Aβ deposition than the approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease treatment, donepezil and tacrine, which reduced Aβ aggregation by only 22% and 7%, respectively, at twice the concentration used in our studies. Therefore, AChE inhibitors such as THC and its analogues may provide an improved therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease simultaneously treating both the symptoms and progression of Alzheimer's disease. - Eubanks, Rogers, Beuscher, Koob, Olson, Dickerson, and Janda. “A Molecular Link Between the Active Component of Marijuana and Alzheimer's Disease Pathology”. National Institute of Health, 2016 ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) - Preclinical models indicate that cannabinoids may hold the potential to delay ALS progression, lending support to anecdotal reports by some patients that cannabinoids may be efficacious in moderating the disease’s development and in alleviating certain ALS-related symptoms such as pain, appetite loss, spasticity, depression and drooling. - Amtmann et al. "Survey of cannabis use in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis". The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, 2006 Multiple Sclerosis - In this long-term follow-up of a clinical trial of a marijuana-based oral spray, patients were followed for as much as 82 weeks. The marijuana spray demonstrated long-term relief of spasticity, pain, and bladder issues related to MS, “without unacceptable adverse effects. - Wade, et al., “Long-Term Use of a Cannabis-Based Medicine in the Treatment of Spasticity and Other Symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis” Multiple Sclerosis, 2006 Visit Foundation for an Informed Texas for more information on conditions and resources- https://www.informedtexas.org/
Просмотров: 342 Foundation for an Informed Texas
What is DEMENTIA? What does DEMENTIA mean? DEMENTIA meaning, definition & explanation
 
04:05
What is DEMENTIA? What does DEMENTIA mean? DEMENTIA meaning, definition & explanation. Dementia, also known as senility, is a broad category of brain diseases that cause a long term and often gradual decrease in the ability to think and remember that is great enough to affect a person's daily functioning. Other common symptoms include emotional problems, problems with language, and a decrease in motivation. A person's consciousness is usually not affected. A dementia diagnosis requires a change from a person's usual mental functioning and a greater decline than one would expect due to aging. These diseases also have a significant effect on a person's caregivers. The most common type of dementia is Alzheimer's disease, which makes up 50% to 70% of cases. Other common types include vascular dementia (25%), Lewy body dementia (15%), and frontotemporal dementia. Less common causes include normal pressure hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, syphilis, and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease among others. More than one type of dementia may exist in the same person. A small proportion of cases run in families. In the DSM-5, dementia was reclassified as a neurocognitive disorder, with various degrees of severity. Diagnosis is usually based on history of the illness and cognitive testing with medical imaging and blood work used to rule out other possible causes. The mini mental state examination is one commonly used cognitive test. Efforts to prevent dementia include trying to decrease risk factors such as high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, and obesity. Screening the general population for the disorder is not recommended. There is no cure for dementia. Cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil are often used and may be beneficial in mild to moderate disorder. Overall benefit, however, may be minor. For people with dementia and those who care for them many measures can improve their lives. Cognitive and behavioral interventions may be appropriate. Educating and providing emotional support to the caregiver is important. Exercise programs are beneficial with respect to activities of daily living and potentially improve outcomes. Treatment of behavioral problems with antipsychotics is common but not usually recommended due to the little benefit and side effects, including an increased risk of death. Globally, dementia affects 36 million people. About 10% of people develop the disorder at some point in their lives. It becomes more common with age. About 3% of people between the ages of 65–74 have dementia, 19% between 75 and 84 and nearly half of those over 85 years of age. In 2013 dementia resulted in about 1.7 million deaths up from 0.8 million in 1990. As more people are living longer, dementia is becoming more common in the population as a whole. For people of a specific age, however, it may be becoming less frequent, at least in the developed world, due to a decrease in risk factors. It is one of the most common causes of disability among the old. It is believed to result in economic costs of 604 billion USD a year. People with dementia are often physically or chemically restrained to a greater degree than necessary, raising issues of human rights. Social stigma against those affected is common.
Просмотров: 2412 The Audiopedia
What's next for intepirdine
 
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Marwan Sabbagh, MD, from Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ provides us with the lastest news on intepirdine. The MINDSET study (NCT02585934), a study evaluating intepirdine in subjects with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease on Donepezil is currently in the Phase III stage, with results expected later this year. Dr Sabbagh is optimistic that intepirdine will be the next drug to be licenced for Alzheimer’s. He is particularly excited about expanding the use of intepirdine into the lewy body dementia space, and seeing what effects it may have in this cohort of patients. This interview was recorded at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2017, London, UK.
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Learn Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Faster with Picmonic (NCLEX® and USMLE, Step 1, Step 2 CK)
 
02:12
Learn Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome faster with the Picmonic Learning System! TRY PICMONIC FOR FREE ► https://www.picmonic.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_term=1481129329&utm_content=video_link&utm_campaign=youtubemedicinepicmonicwalkthroughs_2016 ————————————————— Picmonic turns the information you need to know in medical and nursing school into unforgettable images and stories that are scientifically proven to increase memory retention! Join over 125,000 medical and nursing students using Picmonic’s Visual Learning Community to study and learn more effectively in less time. Picmonic is research proven to increase test scores by 50% and long-term memory retention by 331%. Picmonic for Medicine has you covered for USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK, with subject including Pathology, Pharmacology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Psychiatry, Anatomy, Physiology, Epidemiology, and more! Picmonic for Nursing has you covered for your classes and the NCLEX® with subjects including Fundamentals, Pharmacology, Med-Surg, Anatomy, Physiology, Pediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatric, and more! ————————————————— LET’S CONNECT! General Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonic Nursing Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonicfornursing Twitter ► https://twitter.com/picmonic Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/picmonic/ Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/picmonic/ LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/2703135 Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+Picmonic/posts —————————————————
Просмотров: 8789 PicmonicVideo
Alzheimer's disease
 
53:17
Alzheimer's disease (AD), also known in medical literature as Alzheimer disease, is the most common form of dementia. There is no cure for the disease, which worsens as it progresses, and eventually leads to death. It was first described by German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer in 1906 and was named after him. Most often, AD is diagnosed in people over 65 years of age, although the less-prevalent early-onset Alzheimer's can occur much earlier. In 2006, there were 26.6 million people worldwide with AD. Alzheimer's is predicted to affect 1 in 85 people globally by 2050. Although Alzheimer's disease develops differently for every individual, there are many common symptoms. Early symptoms are often mistakenly thought to be 'age-related' concerns, or manifestations of stress. In the early stages, the most common symptom is difficulty in remembering recent events, known as short term memory loss. When AD is suspected, the diagnosis is usually confirmed with tests that evaluate behaviour and thinking abilities, often followed by a brain scan if available, however, examination of brain tissue is required for a definitive diagnosis. As the disease advances, symptoms can include confusion, irritability, aggression, mood swings, trouble with language, and long-term memory loss. As the person's condition declines they often withdraw from family and society. Gradually, bodily functions are lost, ultimately leading to death. Since the disease is different for each individual, predicting how it will affect the person is difficult. AD develops for an unknown and variable amount of time before becoming fully apparent, and it can progress undiagnosed for years. On average, the life expectancy following diagnosis is approximately seven years. Fewer than 3% of individuals live more than 14 years after diagnosis. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Просмотров: 370 Audiopedia
Dementia warning: Antidepressants 'can increase your risk of the incurable condition'
 
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Dementia warning: Antidepressants 'can increase your risk of the incurable condition': . Thanks for watching, subscribe for more videos. Long-term use of the medication has been linked with the incurable condition even when taken up to 20 years before a diagnosis.The health warning comes after the largest study of its kind into a family of drugs called anticholinergics, used to treat depression, bladder incontinence, Parkinson’s, hayfever and travel sickness.Analysis by British researchers found there was a greater incidence of dementia among patients prescribed greater quantities of anticholinergic antidepressants and anticholinergic medication for bladder conditions and Parkinson’s.Lead researcher Dr George Savva, from the University of East Anglia’s School of Health Sciences, said: “We studied patients with a new dementia diagnosis and looked at what anticholinergic medication they were prescribed between four and 20 years prior to being diagnosed. Related articles Dementia: Mediterranean diet could lower your risk Doing this could be a dementia early warning sign “We found people who had been diagnosed with dementia were up to 30 per cent more likely to have been prescribed specific classes of anticholinergic medications.“And the association with dementia increases with greater exposure to these types of medication. What we don’t know for sure is whether the medication is the cause.“It could be that these medications are being prescribed for very early symptoms indicating the onset of dementia.”Anticholinergics work by blocking a key neurotransmitter in the brain called acetylcholine. Related videos Ed Doolan on heartbreaking experience of living with dementia Using the medical records of more than 300,000 people aged over 65, including 40,770 with a dementia diagnosis between 2006 and 2015 and 283,933 without, scientists studied 27million prescriptions and found some anticholinergic drugs were linked to higher dementia risk, including frequently-prescribed antidepressants Amitriptyline, Dosulepin and Paroxetine.The risk was also associated with Tolterodine, Oxybutynin and Solifenacin, prescribed for bladder conditions, and Procyclidine for Parkinson’s.There was no evidence medications for hayfever, travel sickness or stomach cramps raise the risk of dementia.Dr Doug Brown, chief policy and research officer at Alzheimer’s Society, which funded the new study, said: “This large study confirms some anticholinergic drugs can raise the risk of dementia – but it should put minds at ease as there appears to be no risk with drugs used to treat common conditions like hayfever, travel sickness and stomach cramps.“Current guidelines for doctors say anticholinergic drugs should be avoided for frail older people because of their impact on memory and thinking, but doctors should consider these new findings for all over-65s as long-term use could raise the risk of dementia.”. One in five on antidepressants are prescribed anticholinergics – mostly Amitriptyline.The number of people who may be affected by deme
Просмотров: 21 Haidod nsowpd
Alzheimer's and stress
 
02:48
Neurologist and internationally recognised expert in the field of Alzheimer's Disease, Prof Giovanni B Frisoni talks to the daughter of a patient who asks him key questions to better understand the nature of the disease, its genetic composition, the functioning of drugs currently available on the market, the occurrence of any behavioral disorders, the existence of non-pharmacological aids, and many other aspects of this difficult condition.
Просмотров: 177 centroalzheimer
How to pronounce phenytoin (Dilantin) (Memorizing Pharmacology Flashcard)
 
00:10
Pronunciation flashcards for the print, e-book, and pharmacology audiobook Memorizing Pharmacology: A Relaxed Approach. More difficult medication names will have two pronunciation videos, a flashcard short version and an extended version breaking the pronunciation down syllable by syllable.
Просмотров: 5395 Tony PharmD
Learn Fluoroquinolones Faster with Picmonic (NCLEX®, Nursing School)
 
02:13
Learn Fluoroquinolones faster with the Picmonic Learning System! TRY PICMONIC FOR FREE ► https://www.picmonic.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_term=1481129673&utm_content=video_link&utm_campaign=youtubenursingpicmonicwalkthroughs_2016 ————————————————— Picmonic turns the information you need to know in medical and nursing school into unforgettable images and stories that are scientifically proven to increase memory retention! Join over 125,000 medical and nursing students using Picmonic’s Visual Learning Community to study and learn more effectively in less time. Picmonic is research proven to increase test scores by 50% and long-term memory retention by 331%. Picmonic for Medicine has you covered for USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK, with subject including Pathology, Pharmacology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Psychiatry, Anatomy, Physiology, Epidemiology, and more! Picmonic for Nursing has you covered for your classes and the NCLEX® with subjects including Fundamentals, Pharmacology, Med-Surg, Anatomy, Physiology, Pediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatric, and more! ————————————————— LET’S CONNECT! General Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonic Nursing Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonicfornursing Twitter ► https://twitter.com/picmonic Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/picmonic/ Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/picmonic/ LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/2703135 Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+Picmonic/posts —————————————————
Просмотров: 15777 PicmonicVideo
Learn Clindamycin Faster with Picmonic (USMLE, Step 1, Step 2 CK)
 
01:31
Learn Clindamycin faster using the Picmonic Learning System! TRY PICMONIC FOR FREE ► https://www.picmonic.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_term=1481129329&utm_content=video_link&utm_campaign=youtubemedicinepicmonicwalkthroughs_2016 ————————————————— Picmonic turns the information you need to know in medical and nursing school into unforgettable images and stories that are scientifically proven to increase memory retention! Join over 125,000 medical and nursing students using Picmonic’s Visual Learning Community to study and learn more effectively in less time. Picmonic is research proven to increase test scores by 50% and long-term memory retention by 331%. Picmonic for Medicine has you covered for USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK, with subject including Pathology, Pharmacology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Psychiatry, Anatomy, Physiology, Epidemiology, and more! Picmonic for Nursing has you covered for your classes and the NCLEX® with subjects including Fundamentals, Pharmacology, Med-Surg, Anatomy, Physiology, Pediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatric, and more! ————————————————— LET’S CONNECT! General Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonic Nursing Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonicfornursing Twitter ► https://twitter.com/picmonic Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/picmonic/ Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/picmonic/ LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/2703135 Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+Picmonic/posts —————————————————
Просмотров: 13294 PicmonicVideo
Learn Buspirone Faster with Picmonic (USMLE, Step 1, Step 2 CK)
 
01:13
Learn Buspirone faster using the Picmonic Learning System! TRY PICMONIC FOR FREE ► https://www.picmonic.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_term=1481129329&utm_content=video_link&utm_campaign=youtubemedicinepicmonicwalkthroughs_2016 ————————————————— Picmonic turns the information you need to know in medical and nursing school into unforgettable images and stories that are scientifically proven to increase memory retention! Join over 125,000 medical and nursing students using Picmonic’s Visual Learning Community to study and learn more effectively in less time. Picmonic is research proven to increase test scores by 50% and long-term memory retention by 331%. Picmonic for Medicine has you covered for USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK, with subject including Pathology, Pharmacology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Psychiatry, Anatomy, Physiology, Epidemiology, and more! Picmonic for Nursing has you covered for your classes and the NCLEX® with subjects including Fundamentals, Pharmacology, Med-Surg, Anatomy, Physiology, Pediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatric, and more! ————————————————— LET’S CONNECT! General Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonic Nursing Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonicfornursing Twitter ► https://twitter.com/picmonic Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/picmonic/ Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/picmonic/ LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/2703135 Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+Picmonic/posts —————————————————
Просмотров: 3244 PicmonicVideo
Everybody talks about Alzheimer's disease | William Klein | TEDxNorthernIllinoisUniversity
 
18:40
William Klein talks about the issue of Alzheimer's and how is has evolved over time. He speaks about how Alzheimer's can even effect the economy. He responds to the question about what we can do about Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Klein's research team is working on new ways to diagnose and treat Alzheimer's, a disease now costing the US $200 billion annually -- and likely $1 trillion annually by 2050. The team's strategies are based on their discovery of a potent neurotoxin that builds up in brain tissue of Alzheimer's patients. Dr. Klein is Professor of Neurobiology in Northwestern's Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and is a member of the university's Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center. He formerly was director of the Northwestern University interdepartmental program in neuroscience (NUIN). Before coming to Northwestern, Dr. Klein trained with Nobel Prize Winners Paul Boyer (at UCLA) and Marshall Nirenberg (at NIH). He is co-founder of Acumen Pharmaceuticals, a biotech licensed by Northwestern to develop antibodies against Abeta oligomers for Alzheimer's therapeutics. Dr. Klein is winner of the Zenith Award from the Alzheimer's Association. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Просмотров: 2900 TEDx Talks
Speaking Of Health: ABCs of Alzheimer's Disease
 
01:24:13
Просмотров: 861 QMCHawaii
Galantamine
 
02:31
Просмотров: 356 Janet Henley
Glaucoma Drugs - Cholinomimetics - pilocarpine, carbachol, physostigmine & echothiophate
 
01:43
http://usmlefasttrack.com/?p=1877 Glaucoma, Drugs, Cholinomimetics, pilocarpine, carbachol, physostigmine, echothiophate, Pilocarpine used in emergencies, neurology, Pharmacology, , symptoms, findings, causes, mnemonics, review, what is, video, study, Rapid Review, Clinical presenation, First Aid, for, USMLE, Step 1, images, wiki, define, wikipedia, 2013, videos, exam, prep, easy, What is usmle, mnemonic,
Просмотров: 6365 USMLEFastTrack
What Happens If You Overdose On Seroquel XR
 
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Overdose likely damage from 3500mg seroquel intoxication after extreme oral overdose of quetiapine to attempt what happens if u on gourmet. Avoid getting up too stop using quetiapine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as very stiff what happens i overdose (seroquel, seroquel xr)? 20 mar 2017 increases in blood sugar can happen some people who take xr. I just need to know what happens if i overdose (seroquel, seroquel xr)? . Low white blood cell counts have happened with drugs like this one. Your doctor may if you are not sure what to do, ask your or pharmacist. If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right 4 dec 2015 nov 25, learn about missing a dose, what happens if and to avoid when taking seroquel xr i 8 apr 2016 take overdose on seroquel, bunch of them. Immediately i normally take 250mg seroquel daily along with lamictal to be honest, don't think you are even asking us if done yourself any damage, as not telling of symptoms what's the worst that can happen? . My sister has overdosed on seroquel xr for the second time now. That to happen, you must show he had documented proof that an overdose in if have allergy quetiapine or any other part of seroquel xr. Seek emergency be careful if you drive or do anything that requires to alert. What happens if u overdose on seroquel cute. Do seroquel xr indications, side effects, warnings drugs. Extremely high blood sugar can lead to coma or death. If you i can't find a straight answer online as to how much will kill. Extended release quetiapine (seroquel xr) is for use only in adults and should not be given to anyone younger than 18 years old. 19 things to know about seroquel (quetiapine fumarate). Interactionsimages it helps you to think more clearly and positively about yourself, feel less read the medication guide and, if available, patient information leaflet extended release quetiapine (seroquel xr) is for use only in adults through most of these beliefs are based off anecdotal evidence (if know some instances weight gain can happen after stopping seroquel, but cases will too much seroquel cause seizures though isnt that part od ing first, should not take an older person with dementia, a overdose occurs, call poison control center at 1 800 222 1222 magnesium symptoms maq ball how make drug suppliers prix tablets 50mg what happens cut xr substitute disturbance false positive pregnancy drink alcohol 400 pret dosage espanol probleme side u citalopram 100 mg confezione es para dormir y clonazepam en lcd mylan kill alertness 1200 prolong 200 bodybuilding. Seroquel (quetiapine) side effects, dosage, interactions drugs. Seroquel xr (quetiapine fumarate extended release tablets seroquel side effects, uses, dosage, overdose, pregnancy my husband just tried to od on he took 3000mg fumarate) drug medicine information. What happens if u overdose on seroquel norvasc poll. Will i die or develop problems if accidentally take two
Просмотров: 510 Green Help
What is quetiapine 25 mg used for
 
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What is quetiapine 25 mg used for - Find out more explanation for : 'What is quetiapine 25 mg used for' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Просмотров: 257 moibrad5b
Learn Topiramate Faster with Picmonic (USMLE, Step 1, Step 2 CK)
 
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Learn Topiramate faster using the Picmonic Learning System! TRY PICMONIC FOR FREE ► https://www.picmonic.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_term=1481129329&utm_content=video_link&utm_campaign=youtubemedicinepicmonicwalkthroughs_2016 ————————————————— Picmonic turns the information you need to know in medical and nursing school into unforgettable images and stories that are scientifically proven to increase memory retention! Join over 125,000 medical and nursing students using Picmonic’s Visual Learning Community to study and learn more effectively in less time. Picmonic is research proven to increase test scores by 50% and long-term memory retention by 331%. Picmonic for Medicine has you covered for USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK, with subject including Pathology, Pharmacology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Psychiatry, Anatomy, Physiology, Epidemiology, and more! Picmonic for Nursing has you covered for your classes and the NCLEX® with subjects including Fundamentals, Pharmacology, Med-Surg, Anatomy, Physiology, Pediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatric, and more! ————————————————— LET’S CONNECT! General Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonic Nursing Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonicfornursing Twitter ► https://twitter.com/picmonic Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/picmonic/ Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/picmonic/ LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/2703135 Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+Picmonic/posts —————————————————
Просмотров: 1848 PicmonicVideo
Learn Macrolides Faster with Picmonic (NCLEX®, Nursing School)
 
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Learn Macrolides faster with the Picmonic Learning System! TRY PICMONIC FOR FREE ► https://www.picmonic.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_term=1481129673&utm_content=video_link&utm_campaign=youtubenursingpicmonicwalkthroughs_2016 ————————————————— Picmonic turns the information you need to know in medical and nursing school into unforgettable images and stories that are scientifically proven to increase memory retention! Join over 125,000 medical and nursing students using Picmonic’s Visual Learning Community to study and learn more effectively in less time. Picmonic is research proven to increase test scores by 50% and long-term memory retention by 331%. Picmonic for Medicine has you covered for USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK, with subject including Pathology, Pharmacology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Psychiatry, Anatomy, Physiology, Epidemiology, and more! Picmonic for Nursing has you covered for your classes and the NCLEX® with subjects including Fundamentals, Pharmacology, Med-Surg, Anatomy, Physiology, Pediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatric, and more! ————————————————— LET’S CONNECT! General Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonic Nursing Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/picmonicfornursing Twitter ► https://twitter.com/picmonic Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/picmonic/ Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/picmonic/ LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/2703135 Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+Picmonic/posts —————————————————
Просмотров: 17114 PicmonicVideo
Procrit Strength For Living Commercial
 
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another pill that might kill you side effects include depression & internal bleeding good luck & procrit
Просмотров: 269 nathanolson
Memantine - General Info
 
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This video is about memantine, which is an NMDA antagonist, used primarily for Alzeimer's disease and other dementias. SOURCES and FURTHER READING: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21875407 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17690064 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0011075/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2762361/
Просмотров: 1107 Jonathan Wright