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Abbreviations and acronyms | English writing lesson
 
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In this English writing lesson, I teach you the 4 types of abbreviations: Initialisms, acronyms, shortenings and contractions. I give you the list of the most common abbreviations of each type as well as the grammar rules. Notably you will learn when to use full stops (periods) and capital letters. This video will also help English teachers with their lesson plans. The accent is a British English accent but I also give the rules for American English. Other lessons: Business English expressions: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cQv8pWsnEE Phrasal verbs with PUT: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DA8C5XQAhQs Playlists: General advice: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpQiPot5bKFKZ2wQAk_ESR6_ Grammar: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpS4_AM1c0s0ozpROeE2A9ff Listening practice: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpRdmnAzmYwdc0Az0ZOG2XNA Vocabulary: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpTlYAYSitjwWn29BEdCBi9j Private English lessons & speaking practice: http://goo.gl/n43jjI Andrew, Crown Academy of English http://www.crownacademyenglish.com https://twitter.com/Crown_English http://www.youtube.com/user/CrownAcademyEnglish Photo credits: “Doctor” by stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Просмотров: 45526 Crown Academy of English
Learn English: 10 abbreviations you should know
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ RSVP? ASAP? Etc.? What do these letters mean? In this vocabulary lesson, I will explain and give examples of ten common abbreviations, such as RIP, BYOB, and PIN. I will also teach the difference between i.e., e.g., and etc.. Watch this video ASAP to find out more! Then take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-abbreviations/ Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, we are going to talk about 10 abbreviations you should know. So first of all, what is an abbreviation? Well, here's a clue in the word. You have the word "brev". "Brev" -- in other words, "brevity" -- it means to be short. So abbreviations are words or sentences that we have made short, usually to save time. So for example, ASAP, RSVP, RIP, BYOB, BBQ -- you see the pattern? We have capital letters, and they all stand for something that's longer. So it's a short form of a word or a sentence. So let's look at ten common abbreviations. So the first one we have, "ASAP". What does this mean? "As soon as possible", okay? We use this a lot when we're writing emails, letters, sometimes in conversation. "As soon as possible" is long, so when we don't want to say "as soon as possible", we can shorten it to "ASAP". What are some examples? "Email me ASAP." "Take our quiz ASAP." "Go see the principal ASAP." So it just means to do something as quickly as you can. And this is a very common expression. Our second abbreviation, "RSVP". What does it mean, "RSVP"? It means, "Please reply." Okay? So we often use this if you're invited to something. If, for example, I'm having a birthday party, and I want all of you to come, I would ask you to RSVP. "Please RSVP by Friday." This means, "Please reply. Please tell me you're coming by Friday." "Please RSVP as soon as you can." "Please RSVP by next Saturday." So it means, again, "Please send me a reply so I know you're coming." You, again, see this on invitations, any type of invite, you will see this. Our next common abbreviation, RIP. You may have seen this before. It means, "Rest in peace." So when somebody passes away -- when somebody dies -- often on their tombstone, you'll see "RIP", which stands for, "Rest in peace". If you're on Facebook, and someone you know, maybe they lose a member of their family, they will often write, "RIP Fluffy" if it's a cat; "RIP whoever it is". And it means, "Rest in peace." Okay? So this one has to do with dying and death. No. 4, "BYOB". This is common when we're talking about parties. And it means, "Bring your own beer" or "bring your own booze". Beer, booze -- they're both alcoholic drinks. So "booze" is any drink with alcohol in it. And so what that means is if you're invited to a party, maybe the host doesn't have any alcoholic drinks, so they will tell you, "Bring your own drinks." "Bring your own beer." "Bring your own wine." "BYOB" means "bring your own alcohol". Okay? So it's a very common expression for parties. No. 5, "BBQ". "BBQ" means "barbecue". What's a "barbecue"? It's a way we cook meat. It's a way we cook food. You usually have a grill. You put maybe hamburgers, hot dogs on the grill. You barbecue them. You can eat barbecued chicken, different types of barbecue. So "BBQ" refers to a type of food or a party where they will serve hamburgers and hot dogs. So let's check out five more abbreviations.
Просмотров: 652615 Learn English with Emma [engVid]
SMART Goals - Quick Overview
 
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FREE Online Course https://www.udemy.com/goal-setting/ Learn more at www.decisionskills.com. When setting or evaluating goals, consider using the acronym SMART. Using SMART provides structure that helps ensure goals are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time bound.
Просмотров: 779988 DecisionSkills
Lesson 2: Abbreviations and Symbols
 
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This clip shows a discussion with students about the importance of abbreviations and symbols when transforming information
Просмотров: 78638 gwenberry
SWBAT Meaning - Crafting Your Lesson Objective
 
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If you are a teacher, you have probably come across the acronym SWBAT, which stands for “Students will be able to . . .” In this video, you will understand the meaning of SWBAT and the kinds of lesson verbs that should be used when crafting your lesson objectives SWBAT should begin all of the lesson objectives you write as a teacher. Using SWBAT properly places the focus of a lesson plan on what the students learn and do rather that what the teacher teaches and does. For examples of SWBAT verbs visit http://www.thereligionteacher.com/swbat-verb-examples/
Просмотров: 4275 The Religion Teacher
Learn 17 Business Abbreviations & Acronyms in English
 
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Attn: everyone. Re: business writing. In this lesson we will look at common abbreviations and acronyms used in emails, memos, and other types of business writing. If you work in an office or want to be involved in business at any level in the future, this lesson is for you. As is SOP (standard operating procedure), we will also quiz you at the end to test your understanding. http://www.engvid.com/17-business-abbreviations-acronyms/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's lesson we're going to look at a bit of business writing, and more specifically, we're going to look at abbreviations and acronyms. But before I even start, I want you to understand that a lot of what you're going to see today applies in many situations outside of business, but I'll explain those when we get to them. So, first of all: What's the difference between an abbreviation and an acronym? An "abbreviation" is a shortening of a word. Okay? It's one word that we cut out a bunch of letters and we make it shorter. So, for example, the abbreviation of the word "abbreviation" is "abbr." Okay? "Acronyms", on the other hand, are basically initials. Initials means the first letter of each word. And initials we usually use with people's names, like John Smith, his initials are JS. But when we want to take a bunch of words and we don't want to write all these words, we just want to make something short, but it has to be understood by basically whoever is going to read it, then we're going to use acronyms. Okay? So, let's start with the abbreviations, and in terms of business. Now, especially when we're writing, either a letter by hand like on paper or an email, these are very common. "Attn:" means: Who are you writing to? So, "attention". Whose attention are you trying to get with this letter? "Re:" means "regarding", means: About what? Now, a lot of people might think that "re:" in an email means "reply", it doesn't. "Re:" in an email or a letter always means "regarding". What is the topic of the conversation? So, you know in the email bar it has "re:", what are you talking about when you reply to somebody? The topic. Okay? Next, when we end our letter, we should say who we are and what our position is in the company. So, whether you're the Assistant or the Director, you can write: "Asst.", "Dir." or "Director", or Manager: "Mgr." Notice that all three of them have a capital. So, it doesn't matter if you're using the full word or an abbreviation, you still have to capitalize the title of a position, or the title of the person's place in the company. Okay? So, if you're the Assistant Director, you write: "Asst. Dir." Now, you're wondering why there's no dot here, and there is a dot there. There's a few ways to figure out which one to use, yes or no on the dot. Firstly, the more you read and the more you engage in this sort of writing, you will just see: What is the most common approach? But another way is a style guide. You can use The Chicago Manual of Style, that's the most common one for general purposes. Or if your company has its own style guide or a style sheet, look at it to see if they want a dot or they don't want the dot. It's really a personal choice of the company's. Okay? So, now, the main thing we have to consider is when we're writing something from the company, we're writing it on company stationery. So, the company has pages with a letterhead. It means all the information is already at the top; the name, the logo, the address, etc. So, all of this stuff might already be included, for example: which department, which building you're in, for example, in the address. We always like to take shortcuts, and we don't want to write everything. Write it short. "dept." is enough. Everybody knows "dept." means department. Building is building: "bldg." because we just want to shorten everything. The less, the better. When you end it, you're writing your name, and underneath: Who are you? Like, okay, I know your name, but who are you in terms of the company? So, you're writing your position. Now, you can see all this stuff on business cards, letterheads, etc. So, next, let's look at acronyms. So, if you watched Rebecca's lesson on business acronyms, you heard about Chief Executive Officer, "CEO", this is the boss of the company, he runs or she runs the whole company. Everybody answers to him or her. So, "CO" basically means Chief Officer, "Executive" means of the whole company, but then you have different departments or different areas of the company. "CFO", Chief Financial Officer, Chief Operating Officer, Chief Information Officer, and then there's many other ones that you can use. So, now we're going to look at some more acronyms. One thing to remember: Acronyms always use capital letters. Even if you don't need capitals in the extended version, the acronym will always be capital letters. "ETA", estimated time of arrival.
Abbreviations project
 
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Short Lesson Plan on Abbreviations
Просмотров: 172 r32vicente
The 5 Types of Text Structure
 
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How do authors organize the texts they write? This unit teaches five common text structures used in informational and nonfiction text: description, sequence, cause and effect, compare and contrast, and problem and solution. Check out all the educational videos from Flocabulary, often called the "Schoolhouse Rock" of the 21st Century, at http://flocabulary.com For lesson plans and activities that go along with this video, visit https://www.flocabulary.com/unit/text-structure/ Connect With Us! Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/flocabulary Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/flocabulary Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/flocabulary Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/flocabulary Beat by BogoBeats
Просмотров: 493920 Flocabulary
English Lesson Plan 2
 
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Просмотров: 20 Thawanrat Tamngam
Abbreviations English Lessons 英会話
 
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Просмотров: 16 ippei.en5
Copying an IFR Flight Clearance - MzeroA Flight Training
 
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http://m0a.com Flying IFR can be stressful, most of the stress is put on before you even leave the ground. Many of my students find copying the clearance to be one of the most difficult aspects. I find the most simple way to copy and read back an IFR clearance is to use the acronym CRAFT. Let’s examine what this means. C – Cleared to R – Route A – Altitude F – Frequency T – Transponder code In this video Jason demonstrates how to prepare for a clearance, ask for a clearance and what to do with that clearance during an IFR flight to Lakeland.
Просмотров: 48513 MzeroA Flight Training
Madeline's LOTS Lesson Plan
 
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What changes were made to the lesson plan and why? I decided that an acronym was not what I wanted my students to do. What I had them do is a mnemonic device but it doesn't have a specific name that I could find. I also did not previously have a website that had the breakdown of distances between planets, but I included it in my lesson plan. What additional changes would have made the lesson better? According to my friend and myself I need to do a little bit more interactive stuff since these students are only third graders. I did too much teaching. What was the best part of the lesson? I think the kids would have had fun with the activity as well as the mnemonic device. What was the poorest part of the lesson? The poorest part was probably my explanations and I don't think everything flowed together as much as it should have. What evidence do you have of student learning? The number cards at the end of the lesson would give me that information as well as the activity. What did you gain, professionally, from teaching this lesson? I gained the knowledge that I definitely need to be a little more organized in my planning and thinking. Also, I need to think a little bit more about the age of my students and how long their attention span is.
Просмотров: 36 Madeline Erskine
The ESA Methodology of Teaching - Sample ESA Lesson
 
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This video is part of our ESA Methodology series. If you haven't watched the previous parts, you can do so here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbVib986kweh2W9daqkBRRzF07mdfmzvq The methodology is a three-stage methodology and we are going to look at the individual purposes of each stage and typical activities for each stage. This video shows ideas for a sample straight-arrow ESA lesson. Are you ready to live and teach abroad? Click here and get started today: https://www.teflcourse.net/?cu=YTDESCRIPTION
Просмотров: 4038 TEFL & TESOL Courses - ITTT
Contractions! | Scratch Garden
 
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Learn contractions by watching this video! When writing English or practicing your spelling, contractions can often be confusing. We animate some real examples in this video so you can see the correct way of contracting English words! Primary Teaching Points: contractions, contractions with examples Related Videos: Punctuation Explained! - https://youtu.be/LdCOswMeXFQ You can now download our videos ad-free! ▶ https://wayokids.com/scratchgarden OUR FIRST BOOK IS NOW AVAILABLE! http://amzn.to/2Fm2B0L Support us on Patreon! ▶ https://www.patreon.com/scratchgarden Website: https://www.scratchgarden.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/scratchgarden Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scratchgarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/scratchgarden
Просмотров: 668952 Scratch Garden
How to Create Lesson Plans for Toddlers
 
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How to Create Lesson Plans for Toddlers. Part of the series: Preschoolers & Toddlers. A lesson plan for toddlers should separate indoor and outdoor experiences, and it helps to print out a chart for every day of the week. Learn about efficient scheduling with help from a preschool teacher in this free video on lesson plans for toddlers. Read more: http://www.ehow.com/video_6164937_create-lesson-plans-toddlers.html
Просмотров: 49333 eHowEducation
Abbreviation: Months, Days, Titles, Etc.
 
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Lesson on Abbreviation for Grade 1 ans 2 Class of DLSZ
Просмотров: 101118 Wilma Roldan
How to make table of acronyms/abbreviations in Word
 
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For everyone watching this video, here's my humble request. It's quite easy finding content on YouTube but it takes time and effort to create it It costs nothing to click the Subscribe button. That's the best way you can help small creators like us. . . This video shows you how to make an automatic table of acronyms/abbreviations in Microsoft Office Word 2016/2013/2010/2007 Video Produced by: http://www.the360fun.weebly.com & http://www.suprtechno.blogspot.com
Просмотров: 23339 The360Fun
Medical Terminology - The Basics - Lesson 1 | Practice and Example Problems
 
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21 Basic Medical Terminology Practice Problems to help you learn and better remember what was taught in the Medical Terminology - The Basics, Lesson 1. This video has been designed for those who have completed Lesson 1 and will be used as a sort of “practice test” before students move on to The Basics, Lesson 2. This video is all about breaking down medical terms in a step-by-step way so that you have the future experience to break down other medical terms you see in the future. Please let me know if you want more videos like this one :) JJ For Lesson 1 of Medical Terminology, The Basics:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04Wh2E9oNug For Lesson 2 of Medical Terminology, The Basics: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALWrvliACbQ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For books and other supplemental information on these topics, please check out my Amazon Affiliate Page ➜ https://www.amazon.com/shop/jjmedicine Support future lessons and lectures ➜ https://www.patreon.com/jjmedicine Follow me on Twitter! ➜ https://twitter.com/JJ_Medicine
Просмотров: 14740 JJ Medicine
5 ways to use 'SHOULD' in English
 
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We use “should” when we want to express a recommendation, give advice, give our opinion, ask a question, and more. In this important grammar lesson, I’ll cover the many uses of the auxiliary verb “should” and give you lots of examples to help you understand. I will also teach you some short forms, such as the short form of “should have” and its slang version. Many people write “should of”, but that is incorrect. Watch to find out why. You should really watch this video if you want to improve your English! Take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/auxiliary-verb-should/ Make sure you watch the other two videos in this series: 1. 5 ways to use 'COULD': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ip8kwjiW6w 2. 9 ways to use 'WOULD': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Imfmh66zlX8 TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today we have a lesson on the use of the verb "should", and it's an auxiliary (modal) verb. "Should". So, there are particular ways you can use it. Okay? And this lesson links with two other lessons; there's one on "could" and there's one on "would", so please look out for those as well. Right. So, "should". How do you use "should"? So, first of all, you can use it in a question. For example: "Should we invite the neighbours to our party?" You're having a party, the people who live next door - the neighbours. You might be thinking: "Well, they're nice people; we get on well with them. We don't want them to be disturbed if the party gets noisy, or they may be upset to know that we're having a party and we didn't invite them, so there are all these questions to think about: Should we ask...? Should we invite them?" Or: "Do you think they will like our other friends?" So: "Should we...? Should we?" It's like saying: "Ought we". So, there's another word: "ought", which is also used in the same way. "Ought we to...?" But "should" is more usual. "Should we invite the neighbours to our party?" And then you have to decide yes or no. You might invite them and they might say: "Oh, sorry. We're going out that night already. We have something else." Or they might come; it depends. So: "Should we" used as a question. Okay. Meaning, you know: "Would it be a good idea to?" Okay. Second sentence is when you're telling someone what is a sensible thing to do; what is a good idea to do. "You should..." What you ought to do, again. "You ought to... You should look both ways before crossing the road." You have to look to see: Is...? Is there any traffic? Are there cars coming? Buses? To be safe, you have to look both ways. So: "You should look both ways before crossing the road." It's a sensible thing to do. It's the right thing to do. Okay. And then this one, this one is a little bit old-fashioned and it sounds rather formal, but maybe in a formal situation, like if you're taking an exam and the person organizing it is being very formal with everybody; or there may be a notice up on the wall somewhere in a room, which might say: "Should you wish to do so, you may go for lunch at 12:30." So, "should" here is the same as saying: "if". It's just like "if". "If... If you like, if you want to, if you wish... If you wish to do so" is a little bit formal, again. That's a little bit formal, but you might see it written up on a notice. So: "Should you wish to do so, you may go for lunch at 12:30." That is an acceptable time to go. If you want to go for lunch, 12:30 is the time. So that's instead of "if". Okay. But it's a little bit old-fashioned in style. Okay. Another one, this one begins with "if", but it's different from the previous one. So, somebody may have been asking: "How long will it take me to get to London from here?" So, you may be two hours away by car, so the person would reply: "If... If you take the motorway"-which is the quickest way; the motorway-"you should be there in two hours". So, there's a very good possibility, almost 100% possibility that you will be there. Instead of saying "will"... I mean, that person doesn't know for sure you will be there in two hours; nobody can predict. But: "You should be. 99% sure that you... That... That you will be." So, "should" is 99% sure or certain that you will be there in two hours. It will take you two hours, driving, to arrive in London. Okay. So: "If you take the motorway, you should be there." There's every possibility that you will be there in two hours. Okay. And then, finally, the neighbours are back again. We... So, it looks like you didn't invite the neighbours to the party and perhaps they were upset, either because you didn't invite them or because of the noise that was made at your party with maybe loud music and so on, going late into the night. So: "We should have invited the neighbours to our party, but it's too late now." It's 3 o'clock in the morning, 4 o'clock in the morning, and the neighbours are maybe banging on the wall, trying to get us to stop the noise. […]
Просмотров: 23786 Learn English with Gill (engVid)
Telephone English: Emma's top tips
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Calling someone soon? Do you feel nervous when you speak on the telephone? Many English learners feel uncomfortable when they have to use English on the phone. In this lesson, I will teach you my top tips on how to have a successful telephone conversation. Watch this video and become more confident in your telephone English. Then test yourself with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/telephone-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you about the telephone and cell phones. Telephone English. I'm going to teach you some of my top tips on how to speak well when you're on the telephone. A lot of students get very, very scared when they talk on the telephone. Why is this? Well, you can't see the person's lips moving when you're on the telephone, and the English -- it's sometimes difficult to understand what someone is saying. So it's okay. You can get better at talking on the telephone. And I'm going to tell you how. So let's get started. I have eight tips for you. No. 1, one of the main problems students have when they're on the telephone, is they're very direct. What does "direct" mean? Maybe they'll say something like, "I want to talk to Mr. Bob." Okay? "I want to talk to Mr. Smith." This is very direct English. Why is it direct? "Want." It's not the most polite way to speak. When you say "I want. I want." It's better, when you're on the phone -- especially to someone you don't know that well -- to use polite English, such as "could, would, may." "May I speak to Mr. Bob? May I speak to Mr. Smith?" "Could you hold on a minute, please?" Okay? It sounds a lot nicer. So remember your "could, would, may". Try not to use "want". Tip No. 2, practice. Practice, practice, practice. Practice makes perfect. But how do you practice? Who will you practice with? Well, one idea is if you know that there's a business, and the business is closed for the day, you can call their telephone number. Maybe they have an answering machine you can listen to. What I would recommend is call a business you know will be closed; listen to their answering machine message; and try to take notes on what they say. And then call back, and see. Did what you hear -- is it the same? Is it the same from the first time you called to the second time? Are your notes correct? So very key is practice. You can also practice with a friend. You can practice in front of the mirror. "Hello!" Okay? So practice, practice, practice. No. 3, spelling. A lot of the time, we have to spell on the phone. Sometimes you have to spell your name, your last name, your address. So it's very important to be able to pronounce alphabet letters, a-b-c-d-e. So it's very important that you can say these letters correctly. And also that you know how to spell things out on the phone. So what do I mean by this? Well, for example, if you have to call someone, and they need to write down your last name, and your last name is -- we'll say your last name is White, so White. So you're on the phone, and they say, "What's your last name?" "My last name is White." And then you start spelling it. "W as in 'Wilson'; H as in 'Hilgar' -- it's a weird name, but -- I as in 'Iceland'." So what you do is you spell out your name using examples. So for example, if I'm spelling "Emma", I'd say, "My name is Emma. That's E as in 'Erin'; M as in 'Mary'; M as in 'Mary'; A as in 'Anne'." Why do we do this? It's because some English letters sound the same. If you're on the phone, and you say "p-d-t-v", they all sound so similar. By spelling out in this way, the person will know which letter you're talking about. Tip No. 4, numbers. A lot of the time, when you talk on the phone, you have to use numbers or someone will tell you a number, and you may have to write it down. It's very important to practice your numbers. Practice listening for numbers. So for example, a lot of students have trouble with 30 vs. 13, okay? What's the difference? 30, the first part is long, "thir"; the second part is short, "ty". "Thirty". Versus 13, where the first part of the number, and the second part is long. So it's very important to get used to numbers like 14 vs. 40, 15 vs. 50. And you should also practice listening to long numbers. Okay? Maybe if I say the number one, you understand that. It's easy. But try to listen to this number. If I say "4-45-1-7-8-10-100", maybe it would be more challenging. So practice your numbers.
Просмотров: 917586 Learn English with Emma [engVid]
Speak English Naturally with WOULD contractions: I'D, YOU'D, HE'D...
 
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Want to sound more like a native speaker? In this lesson, I will teach you many "would" contractions that native speakers use frequently without thinking about them. For example, using "I'd" instead of "I would" is a quick and easy way to sound more natural. I will teach you how to pronounce these words correctly so that you can start using them right away. Take our quiz at the end of the video to make sure you understand the material. http://www.engvid.com/speak-english-would-contractions/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's lesson, I am going to help you with your pronunciation. Today I am going to teach you how to pronounce contractions for the word "would". Okay? So, first of all, "would". When do we use "would"? We use it a lot in English. One of the times in beginner and intermediate levels we use it is when we are at a restaurant. The server will ask you: "Oh, what would you like?" And you would respond: "I would like pizza.", "I would like chicken.", "I would like tacos.", "I would like coffee." Okay? Now, the problem is... "Would"... This is all correct grammar-wise, but many, many students have trouble when it comes to pronouncing "would". Okay? The "w" sound is a little difficult, so many students can't pronounce this correctly. Okay? Also, a lot of native speakers, like myself, a lot of Canadians and Americans, we don't really say "would" that frequently. What we usually say instead are contractions. So, a contraction is a short form. Instead of saying: "I would", "I'd" has the same meaning. Okay? So this apostrophe here actually means "woul". Okay? So this means there are all these missing letters, but we don't actually need them. Contractions are very, very common in spoken English. Not writing, but in speaking, we use them a lot. Okay? So, if you want to sound more Canadian or more American, you should use contractions. So, let's look at some of these contractions. So: -"What would you like? What would you like to order?" -"I'd like some tea." Okay? So, let's start with that. I want you to repeat after me. "I'd", "I'd". And again, this means "I would", "I'd". So it almost sounds like "eye-de". "I'd", "I'd like some tea. I'd like some tea." Now, maybe you're talking about... To your friend. Okay? In this case, if you want to say: "You would like tea", you can say: "You'd", "you'd". So, again: "You-de", "you'd". "You'd like some tea.", "You'd like some bread.", "You'd enjoy going to the beach." Okay? "You'd". Now, if you're talking about a boy or a man, we can use the word... Instead of: "he would", you can use: "he'd". Okay? And notice, this one, I actually smiled quite a lot. "He'd". "He'd like toast.", "He'd like the chicken.", "He'd like a salad." Okay? "He'd". For women, we would use: "she'd", "she'd". And again, notice my smile, "she'd". "He'd", "she'd". They rhyme. "She'd like coffee.", "She'd like coffee.", "She'd like pizza." Okay? And again, "she'd" means "she would". "She would like pizza.", "She'd like pizza." Okay, now, if we're talking about us and someone else, we would say: "we'd", "we'd". Okay? And again, there's a big smile on my face. "We'd". "We'd like chicken.", "We'd like poutine.", "We'd like french fries.", "We'd like hot dogs." Okay? Example of "we'd". Finally: "they'd". "They'd like". So this is if you have "they would", it becomes "they'd". And you'll notice-very simple-all of them are just apostrophe "d". "They'd like chicken.", "They'd like to study English." Okay? So any time you want to use the word "would", try to replace it with a contraction. It will make you sound more like a native speaker. And, you know, especially if you have trouble with the pronunciation of "would", just adding apostrophe "d" will really help you with your spoken English. So, I invite you to come visit our website at www.engvid.com. There, you can do a quiz on this subject just to make sure you understand all of the material. You can also come... Subscribe to my YouTube channel. I have a lot of other videos on pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, and many other topics. So, thank you for watching, and until next time, take care.
Просмотров: 572584 Learn English with Emma [engVid]
Talking about Jobs and Occupations in English - Free English Lesson
 
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Talking about Jobs and Occupations in English - Free English Lesson In this lesson you will learn how to ask someone what they do for a living (job) and how to answer someone if they ask you. There is an example of a brief conversation between two people. The last part of the lesson is a description of jobs and a description of the job and where they work. What does occupation or living mean? Occupation what do people do for there jobt people do to make a living. And because all of us do something or the other, we often talk about occupations. Here are some sample phrases and sentences you can use to talk about occupations. How to ask someone what they do for a living So John, what do you do for a living? What is your occupation? What do you do to make a living? I am a Docter. I help help sick people I am a hairdresser. I cut hair. I am a computer programmer. I make computer programs.
On an Airplane - English Vocabulary Lesson
 
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On an Airplane - English Vocabulary Lesson English is the most common second language that crew members speak in a flight. Whether you are a student, business man or a leisure traveller, this lesson can help you learn important words and expressions to use while you are on an airplane. To board a plane | Embark- To get on the plane which is ready to takeoff. Cabin - The interior of the aircraft. Flight attendant - Man or Woman who provides service for passengers during a flight. Aisle - the long empty space that you walk down ( between the seating rows) Overhead bin - The place above the seats for storing luggage. Galley - A kitchen or an area with kitchen facilities in a plane. Cockpit - The part of the plane where the captain and his co-pilots sit. Pilot- The person who drives/flies the plane. Co-pilot- Person who helps the captain fly the plane. Taxing- Driving an airplane to the correct place for taking off or deboarding. Take-off- When the plane leaves the ground. Motion sickness- A bad feeling in the stomach that passengers get during a rough ride in a plane. To cruise- To fly at a constant speed that permits maximum operating efficiency. Turbulence- Violent or unsteady movement of air. Call light- A button passengers can press to get a crew member's attention. Flight entertainment- Refers to the entertainment available to aircraft passengers during a flight.Usually LCD screens on the back of the seat playing movies and songs. Refreshments- Drinks and snacks offered to passengers during the flight. Touch down- When the aircraft wheels land on the ground.
IELTS & TOEFL Writing: 5 Common Mistakes
 
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Are you writing essays and getting the same score over and over again? Would you like to learn some techniques you can use to improve your writing and get a better score on the IELTS or TOEFL? Well, in this lesson, I will teach you five common errors that many students make that can lower their score. After watching this lesson, you will know what to avoid, what to include, and why trying too hard might actually be hurting your score. Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/ielts-toefl-writing-5-common-mistakes/ Visit Adam's site at http://www.writetotop.com/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson, we're looking at IELTS and TOEFL, the writing section, and we're going to look at the five most common mistakes that I see when I'm checking students' essays. Okay? Now, as usual, for the IELTS and TOEFL lesson, I will speak a little bit more natural speed, a little bit faster than usual. If you're a beginner, don't worry. Watch the video, listen, practice your listening. Get the vocabulary you need. It's all... It's good for everybody, but just a little bit harder. Okay? So, now, where do I begin? I check a lot of essays. Okay? People send me their essays, I check them, I edit them, I tell them what they're doing wrong, and I've come to the realization that there are certain mistakes that many, many people make. So, I want to tell you five of these common mistakes so that you can avoid making them. Okay? And the first one-and this is the most common mistake that I see-is that you are trying too hard. Now, what does this mean? Trying hard is a good thing, right? Yes, it is. But you're trying too hard to sound impressive. Okay? You're trying to impress the graders of these... Of these exams, IELTS and TOEFL, you think that by using big words or lots of idioms, or very, very long sentences that are very complex and have many clauses that you're getting a higher score. In fact, most of the times, you're actually hurting yourselves. Why? Because you're using words incorrectly, you're using them inappropriately, meaning in the wrong context or the wrong usage or in the wrong parts of speech; you're using a verb when you should use a noun, etc. When you write very, very long sentences, quite often, you have run-on sentences, mean... Meaning you have two independent clauses in one sentence, and no punctuation, and no conjunctions, and then the whole sentence falls apart and means nothing. And also, a lot of people use idioms because... Yeah, idioms will get you extra points, but they're using them incorrectly or in the wrong context. Again, make sure you know the words you're using, make sure you know the idioms you're using, and shorter sentences can actually be better. Simple is often better than complex. If you think about... As an analogy, if you think about cooking, the more spices you put into the dish, the less you taste the actual meat or the actual core of the dish. Simple is best. Let me give you an example. Here are two sentences. Okay? Let me read them to you. "The CEO", Chief Executive Officer, like the head of the company... "The CEO's tenure at the company was abbreviated due to his reluctance to integrate more females into upper managerial posts, thereby drawing the ire of the Board who consequently relieved him of his duties." Now, this sentence is perfectly okay. It's grammatically correct, all the words are being used correctly, but if you can write a sentence like this the way that I wrote it here, then you don't need to worry about the IELTS or the TOEFL; your English is obviously very high level. If you can do this, then this test will be very easy for you. However, a lot of people, a lot of test-takers try to write this sentence, and then they end up making many, many mistakes. They don't use this word correctly: "abbreviated", they say: "abbreviation". Okay? That's the more common thing of it. "Abbreviated" means made shorter. Okay? "Reluctance", hesitance, like not really wanting to. This word: "ire". I write all the time, I write for a living. I never use this word "ire", because it's so old-fashioned. And also, it's a small word. Right? So you don't need many syllables, you don't need very rare words. You need to be simple, you need to get your message across. The most important part of the test is: Answer the question. They give you a task, answer it. Answer it clearly, concisely. Means: Use fewer words, not more words. If you can say the same thing in fewer words, get the message across, make it clear, make the reader interested, then you'll get higher points than if you write something like this. Okay? Let's look at this sentence: "The CEO's time was cut short because he wouldn't promote women to top positions, which angered the Board who then fired him." Okay, look at the two sentences. This sentence means exactly the same thing as this sentence.
100 Most Commonly Used computer Full Forms
 
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100 Computer Related Short Forms & Full Forms Abbreviations 1. FULL FORM OF COMPUTER - COMMONLY OPERATED MACHINE PARTICULARLY USED IN TECHNICAL AND EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH 2. FULL FORM OF 3D - THREE DIMENSIONAL 3. FULL FORM OF 3G - 3RD GENERATION 4. FULL FORM OF AAC - ADVANCED AUDIO CODING 5. FULL FORM OF AC97 - AUDIO CODEC 97 6. FULL FORM OF AMR - ADAPTIVE MULTI-RATE 7. FULL FORM OF ASI - ASYNCHRONOUS SERIAL INTERFACE 8. FULL FORM OF ASP - ACTIVE SERVER PAGES 9. FULL FORM OF ATM - AUTOMATED TELLER MACHINE 10. FULL FORM OF BASIC - BEGINNER'S ALL-PURPOSE SYMBOLIC INSTRUCTION CODE 11. FULL FORM OF BCC - BLIND CARBON COPY 12. FULL FORM OF BIOS - BASIC INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM 13. FULL FORM OF BPO - BUSINESS PROCESS OUTSOURCING 14. FULL FORM OF FAT - FILE ALLOCATION TABLE 15. FULL FORM OF NTFS - NEW TECHNOLOGY FILE SYSTEM 16. FULL FORM OF SMPS - SWITCH MODE POWER SUPPLY 17. FULL FORM OF PDF - PORTABLE DOCUMENT FORMAT 18. FULL FORM OF COBOL - COMMON BUSINESS-ORIENTED LANGUAGE 19. FULL FORM OF CODEC - CODER-DECODER 20. FULL FORM OF CPU - CENTRAL PROCESSING UNIT 21. FULL FORM OF CSS - CASCADING STYLE SHEETS 22. FULL FORM OF DIVX - NAMED AS A PARADOY TO DIVX SYSTEM 23. FULL FORM OF DNS - DOMAIN NAME SYSTEM 24. FULL FORM OF DVI - DIGITAL VIDEO INTERACTIVE 25. FULL FORM OF ET - EXABYTE 26. FULL FORM OF FLAC - FREE LOSSLESS AUDIO CODEC 27. FULL FORM OF FTP - FILE TRANSFER PROTOCOL 28. FULL FORM OF GB - GIGABYTE 29. FULL FORM OF GIF - GRAPHICS INTERCHANGE FORMAT 30. FULL FORM OF GOOGLE - GLOBAL ORGANIZATION OF ORIENTED GROUP LANGUAGE OF EARTH 31. FULL FORM OF GPRS - GENERAL PACKET RADIO SERVICE 32. FULL FORM OF GPS - GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM 33. FULL FORM OF GSM - GLOBAL SYSTEM FOR MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS 34. FULL FORM OF HD - HIGH DEFINITION 35. FULL FORM OF HTML - HYPERTEXT MARKUP LANGUAGE 36. FULL FORM OF HTTPS - HYPERTEXT TRANSFER PROTOCOL 37. FULL FORM OF IMEI - INTERNATIONAL MOBILE EQUIPMENT IDENTITY 38. FULL FORM OF IP - INTERNET PROTOCOL 39. FULL FORM OF ISP - INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER 40. FULL FORM OF IT - INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 41. FULL FORM OF JAD - JAVA APPLICATION DESCRIPTOR 42. FULL FORM OF JPEG- JOINT PHOTOGRAPHIC EXPERTS GROUP 43. FULL FORM OF KB - KILOBYTE 44. FULL FORM OF LCD - LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAY 45. FULL FORM OF LED - LIQUID ELECTRONIC DISPLAY 46. FULL FORM OF MB - MEGABYTE 47. FULL FORM OF MBPS - MEGA BITS PER SECOND 48. FULL FORM OF MICR - MAGNETIC INK CHARACTER RECOGNITION 49. FULL FORM OF MIS - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM 50. FULL FORM OF MMS - MULTIMEDIA MESSAGING SERVICE 51. FULL FORM OF MP3 - MPEG LAYER-3 52. FULL FORM OF MP4 - MPEG LAYER-4 53. FULL FORM OF MPEG - MOVING PICTURE EXPERTS GROUP 54. FULL FORM OF OSS - OPEN SOUND SYSTEM 55. FULL FORM OF PC - PERSONAL COMPUTER 56. FULL FORM OF PDF - PORTABLE DOCUMENT FORMAT 57. FULL FORM OF PERL - PRACTICAL EXTRACTION AND REPORT LANGUAGE 58. FULL FORM OF PING - PACKET INTERNET GROPER 59. FULL FORM OF PROLOG - PROGRAMMING IN LOGIC 60. FULL FORM OF PT - PETABYTE 61. FULL FORM OF QIF - QUICKEN INTERCHANGE FORMAT 62. FULL FORM OF QRCODE - QUICK RESPONSE CODE 63. FULL FORM OF RAM - RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY 64. FULL FORM OF RIP - REST IN PEACE 65. FULL FORM OF RSS- REALLY SIMPLE SYNDICATION 66. FULL FORM OF SATA - SERIAL ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY ATTACHMENT 67. FULL FORM OF SEO - SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION 68. FULL FORM OF SIM - SUBSCRIBER IDENTITY MODULE 69. FULL FORM OF SMIL - SYNCHRONIZED MULTIMEDIA INTEGRATION LANGUAGE 70. FULL FORM OF SMS - SHORT MESSAGE SERVICE 71. FULL FORM OF SOS - SEND OUT SUCCOUR 72. FULL FORM OF SQL - STRUCTURED QUERY LANGUAGE 73. FULL FORM OF SSL - SECURE SOCKETS LAYER 74. FULL FORM OF TB - TERABYTE 75. FULL FORM OF TFT - THIN FILM TRANSISTER 76. FULL FORM OF TIFF - TAGGED IMAGE FILE FORMAT 78. FULL FORM OF UPS - UNINTERRUPTED POWER SUPPLY 79. FULL FORM OF URL - UNIFORM RESOURCE LOCATOR 80. FULL FORM OF USB - UNIVERSAL SERIAL BUS 81. FULL FORM OF VB - VISUAL BASIC 82. FULL FORM OF VBR - VARIABLE BIT RATE 83. FULL FORM OF VBS - VISUAL BASIC SCRIPT 84. FULL FORM OF VCD - VIDEO COMPAQ DISK 85. FULL FORM OF VIRUS - VITAL INFORMATION RESOURCES UNDER SEIZE 86. FULL FORM OF VLC - VIDEO LAN CLIENT 87. FULL FORM OF WAP - WIRELESS APPLICATION PROTOCOL 88. FULL FORM OF WIFI - WIRELESS FIDELITY 89. FULL FORM OF WMA - WINDOWS MEDIA AUDIO 90. FULL FORM OF WMV - WINDOWS MEDIA VIDEO 91. FULL FORM OF WWW - WORLD WIDE WEB 92. FULL FORM OF XBL - XML BINDING LANGUAGE 93. FULL FORM OF XML - EXTENSIBLE MARKUP LANGUAGE 94. FULL FORM OF YT - YOTTABYTE 95. FULL FORM OF ZB - ZETTABYTE 96. FULL FORM OF ZIP- ZONE IMPROVEMENT PLAN 97. FULL FORM OF CD - COMPAQ DISK 98. FULL FORM OF DVD - DIGITAL VERSATILE DISK AND DIGITAL VIDEO DISC 99. FULL FORM OF FORTRAN - FORMULA TRANSLATION 100. FULL FORM OF LAN - Local Area Network == x == General Knowledge (GK) Question & Answer SUBSCRIBE : http://bit.ly/2wrZqn4
Просмотров: 284265 General Knowledge GK Q&A
Math-4-Rule of BODMAS (English,Hindi)
 
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LIKE | COMMENT | SHARE | SUBSCRIBE This is a very basic topic of Mathematics. This is the way from which we can solve any quadritic equation. In this video we are giving you Rule of BODMAS. From which you can solve any quadratic equation or any general calculation based questions.B for Bracket ( ) { }[ ] , O for 'of' ,D for division (÷) ,M for Multiplication( ×) , A for Addition (+) ,S for Subtraction (-). First of all , bracket are open then solve 'of' then do division then Multiplication then addition and at last Subtraction.This is the way of order to solve the questions. watch our previous video-- 1-Math -3 - Rule Of Symbols (चिन्हों का नियम)-(English,Hindi) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gB_wJa9Yei4 2-Math -2 -Short Tricks Of Multiplication (Hindi,English) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSpEbX5iCBA 3-Math -1-short tricks to find square of number -(English,Hindi) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tb4BG... 4-Reasoning Shortcut Tricks-- Alphabetical Order (English,Hindi) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wrHR... 5-Reasoning Shortcut Tricks--Alphanumeric Series (Short tricks ) - English,Hindi,Urdu) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sstaj... aap hame facebook par follow kar sakate hai-
Просмотров: 1053860 small talk
STD 9 TERM 1.8 Old man river
 
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Q.R scanned content from IX std 1Term English book. Visit www.digitalclassroom.com for collection of Mindmaps, Q.R contents, Worksheets and Lesson plans.
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How to use ABBREVIATE in a sentence
 
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ABBREVIATE (verb); To make briefer; to reduce to a shorter form intended to stand for the whole. Examples of how to use abbreviate in a sentence. www.vocabslam.com Tags learn vocabulary SAT GRE VocabSlam use abbreviate in sentence prep free vocabu Teacher School Education Teachers Lesson Student Students Tube Language Tutorials University Lessons Plans Resources Teaching Homeschool Speak
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English Grammar: Past Simple Time Markers
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ "Just now, I have seen a movie" or "Just now, I saw a movie" -- which sentence is correct? In this grammar lesson, I will teach you about past simple time markers. Time markers like yesterday, just now, last week, and ago can help you to know if you should use the past simple tense or present perfect. Teachers love to test students on this, so watch this video, do the quiz, and be prepared for your next test or writing assignment. http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-past-simple-time-markers/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's lesson, we are going to talk about something many students have difficulty with. We are going to talk about the past simple -- or simple past -- tense and time markers, which can help students to figure out what tense to use. So I'll explain this in a second. First, my question: What is the past simple? What is the simple past? Well, "I ate two cookies." The present tense: "I eat two cookies. Every day, I eat two cookies." So in the past, we would say "ate". So usually, simple past are verbs, actions that end in "-ed". So we have "cleaned" -- "I cleaned the floor." "I cooked spaghetti." "I baked a cake." "I worked all night." These are all "-ed" -- past verbs. We also have some things called "irregular verbs", like "ate" -- "ate", "lay". What are some other irregular verbs? "I ran to school yesterday." "I run -- right now, I am running. Every day I run to school. Yesterday I ran to school." So these are irregular verbs. So if you look at my timeline, we have the future. What's the future? Everything after today. So this would be tomorrow. Maybe this would be a week from now. Maybe this would be 2020, and then 2050. So this is the future. This line right here represents now. Today it is the year 2013, okay? Maybe when you watch this, maybe it will be 2014, but right now, as I film, it is 2013. So that's the present; that's now. This is all the past, okay? This is all before. This is 1990, 1950, 2000. This is yesterday, so things that happened before. So when we talk about the past tense, we're talking about here. Okay. So now, let me tell you what "time markers" are. Many students, they hear the present -- present perfect: "I've never been to China." "I have eaten four cakes today." They hear this, and then they hear the simple past, "I ate four cakes." Which one do you use? Simple past? Present perfect? And teachers love to test on this. So how do you know? Well, one way is using things called "time markers". These are our time markers right here. So we have, "yesterday", "the other day", "last week", "last month", "last year", "when", "just now", "ago", and "in". So these are all words that we can use with the past simple or simple past. You do not use these words with the future. You do not use these words with any of the presents. You use them with the simple past or past simple. Okay. So let's do some examples. I could put "yesterday" here. "Yesterday, I ate two cookies." Okay? I could say, "Yesterday, I ate two cookies." "The other day, I ate two cookies." "Last week, I ate two cookies." "Last month, I ate two cookies." "Last year, I ate two cookies." Even if this isn't written, if it's a test: "I _________ two cookies." "I eat two cookies"? "I have eaten two cookies"? As soon as I see "yesterday", I know: "Yesterday -- ate." "The other day -- ate." "Last week -- ate." Okay? So these are your clues. So memorize them. Associate them with the simple past. Now, we have "when" here. What do I mean by "when"? "I ate two cookies when -- when I was eight years old." "I ate two cookies when I broke up with my boyfriend." Okay? So you can use -- when you see "when -- blah, blah, blah", "when I -- blah, blah, blah", this is a clue. This should be -- what should it be? Simple past or past simple; not present perfect. "Just now": "Just now, I ate two cookies." "Just now, I went shopping." "Just now, I made a video." Okay? So again, "just now" -- what is it? That's right. Past simple or simple past. "Ago": "ago"? This is when you're talking about a certain amount of time. "Two years ago, I went to Thailand." "Five years ago, I went to France." "Two days ago, I ate two cookies." Okay? So there's usually a number in either years, days, weeks -- "ago". As soon as you see "ago" -- past. Finally, the last one we will talk about today: "in". "In 1990 -- what happened in 1990? In 1990, I was a little kid." "In 2000, I finished grade 8." "In 2009, I think, I finished university." So if you see "in" with a year, what is it? It's simple past. Okay. Very good. And what do all of these things have in common? Again, they are talking about -- if we look at this -- a moment in time, okay? They're looking at a moment. They're not looking at this whole period of time. They are not looking at a long period of time. They're looking at a moment. All right, so let's do some questions to see how much you guys remember.
Просмотров: 676859 Learn English with Emma [engVid]
Learn Punctuation: period, exclamation mark, question mark
 
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http://www.engvid.com You see them all the time, but do you know how to use them correctly? In this lesson we go over the basic punctuation marks used to end a sentence. I also teach you to identify and avoid the run-on sentence, which is a common mistake ESL students and native speakers make in their writing. Watch this lesson to learn the quick and easy rules for using the period, exclamation mark, and question mark! Then take the quiz on it here: http://www.engvid.com/learn-punctuation-period-exclamation-mark-question-mark/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome to www.engvid.com again. My name's Adam. Today, I'm responding to some requests for punctuation lessons. So, today's lesson is about punctuation. I'm going to focus on the period, the exclamation mark, and the question mark. Now, you're thinking: why am I beginning with these three? Because these are the ends of sentences. Right? These always come at a very specific point in the sentence, always at the end, always with a clear purpose. What is the purpose? A period ends a sentence. Seems simple enough, everybody knows this. Correct? But it's not that simple. Many, many times I've seen students writing and not putting the period in the correct place. What... Another thing you have to remember about the period is what comes after it is always a capital letter. Okay? Many people forget the capital after a period. A period ends a sentence which means it ends a complete idea. Whatever comes after the period is already a new idea. Of course, one idea flows to the next idea; one idea builds on the previous idea, but they are two separate ideas. When you have completed your sentence, when you have completed your idea - put a period. And British people call this: "a full stop". Same idea, means: full stop, done, next idea. Okay? With a capital letter. Always don't forget the capital letter. Or never forget the capital letter. Okay? Another thing to remember about the period is that once you have a sentence with a complete independent clause and you don't have another independent clause with a conjunction, "and", "but", "so", "or", etcetera or a semi-colon-this is a semi-colon-that means your sentence is finished. If you have two independent clauses in a sentence and you don't have the conjunction, you don't have the semi-colon, means you have a run-on sentence. Okay? A "run-on sentence" is a sentence that has two subjects, two verbs, no spacing, no conjunction, no period. Okay? Let's look at an example of a run-on sentence. "Stacey and Claire went shopping at the mall with Ted and Alex they bought new clothes." Does this sentence seem okay to you? If it does, there's a problem. Okay? We have "Stacey and Claire" as your subject-sorry, this is a "v" actually-"went shopping at the mall". Where? "With Ted and Alex". With who? This is a complete idea. "Stacey and Claire went shopping at the mall with Ted and Alex." Your idea is complete, this is what they did. Now, at the mall, what did they do? "They bought new clothes." I put a period, I put a capital. I have to separate ideas, therefore, two separate sentences. Now, is there any other way I can fix this? Of course. I can put a comma after: "Alex," I could put the word: "and they bought", in which case, that sentence is fine. "And" joins two independent. So, every time you're writing... Punctuation, of course, is for writing, not for speaking; we don't see punctuation in speaking. Every time you write, check your sentences. If you have two independent clauses, means two subject, subject, verb, and then subject, verb. If you have two of these, two combinations of subject and verb without a period between them, without a conjunction, without a semi-colon - you have a run-on sentence. Okay? Just to make sure, here's another sentence. I'll take this away. Something came before. "As a result," -of whatever came before-"the police evacuated the tenants of the building they thought this would be safer." Oh. "The tenants of the building they thought this would be safer." Wait a minute. What's going on? Where does the sentence end? Where does the idea end? What's the next part of the sentence? Okay? "The police evacuated". Who? "The tenants". Which tenants? "Of the building". Okay? "The building they thought this", no. Okay, "The building that they thought this", no, doesn't make sense. So this must be the next subject, "they thought". Who are "they"? The police. "They thought". What? "This would be safer." So now, I need to put something here. I need to break up these two sentences because they're two separate ideas. This sentence explains why they did the action in the first sentence.
Margot Robbie Teaches You Australian Slang | Vanity Fair
 
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Suicide Squad’s Margot Robbie knows the difference between “chunders” and “chucking a sickie,” and now you will too. Learn 50 Australian slang terms with Margot Robbie! Photographer Patrick Demarchelier Fashion and Style Director Jessica Diehl Hair Stylist Didier Malige Makeup Artist Mark Carrasquillo Producer Cate Sturgess Produced on Location by Alan Jaouen for Float & Shoot Still haven’t subscribed to Vanity Fair on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2z6Ya9M ABOUT VANITY FAIR Arts and entertainment, business and media, politics, and world affairs—Vanity Fair’s features and exclusive videos capture the people, places, and ideas that define modern culture. Margot Robbie Teaches You Australian Slang | Vanity Fair
Просмотров: 6173464 Vanity Fair
LIVE English Lesson - 19th November 2017 - Christmas is coming - SMS abbreviations - Grammar
 
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Learning English with Mr Duncan. Another Live English lesson. Sunday 19th November 2017.Is it too soon to start celebrating Christmas? What is the difference between a cottage pie and a shepherds pie? We will take a look at SMS text abbreviations. How do you stop a nosebleed? We have some super duper flash words. Mr Steve will be here at 3 as live as live can be with another strange health tip. You are welcome to join in on the live chat. POPPY LESSON - https://youtu.be/Wv1bSkZIJMA Direct donation through PAYPAL - http://www.paypal.me/misterduncan Misterduncan's PLAYLISTS Ask Misterduncan - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAD0A8CFF102D5CF2 Lessons 1 to 91- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF467B6C12B713A03 Full English - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DYX8jVA_kcIpQuRBXcf2XIZ English Topic - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DaUGBc2dP0bSbgCtpkiCnT7 PAST LIVE ENGLISH STREAMS - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DbsIVnI4jp9mmwDHbICa2_d WORD STOP - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8AC561C1AE953017 May days - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DaKQi3YG30D_NyX881Wsiln Dunctober - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DY7Olv13JrMwgdKsJ0Xwohq December drop in - https://www.youtube.com/playlistlist=PLbvnlSJNf_DY7bb_xeLDzKPEJLzN4Z3io Xmas lessons - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DYGEKPZ5Q1_CVxLbsH4tjVv My life in China and England - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL44BC10EEFAC0AF40 Other English lessons - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8B3F18AC104C9F46
Просмотров: 9796 Speak English With Misterduncan
Beginner VIPKID Lesson
 
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I was a teacher for ten years. I taught mostly overseas. When I moved back to the States I realized that I did not enjoy it. I found very flexible jobs (one of them being VIPKID) that gave me the flexibility to work while building my own business at the same time. Now I work for myself from home doing what I enjoy each day. Are you wanting to transition from your full-time teaching job to having your own business? I help women transition from their full-time jobs to having their own online businesses where they work from home. Having your own online business allows you to spend more time with your kids while doing something you enjoy each day. I am offering a limited number of 15-minute calls for people that want to see how they can build their own online business. You can schedule your free call here: https://calendly.com/jessicatosser/15min
Просмотров: 61632 Quit Your Teaching Job
Phlebotomy Lesson 1.1 Introduction
 
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This lesson introduces the student to the online phlebotomy program and reviews the administrative details for successful completion of the program. This video is designed to be the starting point for the online phlebotomy program for Experion Medical Academy and provide an example of lesson format for those interested in taking the course. If you wish to enroll in the online course and receive a certificate of completion and be eligible for the national exam, please register by visiting www.4yourcna.com and click on the Phlebotomy link.
Просмотров: 4866 4yourCNA
i.e. vs e.g. | Basic English Grammar Rules | ESL | SAT | TOEFL
 
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i.e. and e.g. are handy abbreviations to use in your writing. But make sure you don’t get them confused! In this video, we’ll explain what these two common abbreviations mean and their correct usage. e.g. stands for “exempli gratia” and means “for example.” Note that this is the correct way to abbreviate “for example,” not “ex.” i.e. stands for “id est” and means “that is.” You have great ideas. But no one will know about them if you can't communicate effectively! Our series of Basic English Grammar Rules will help you brush up your language skills. People will pay attention to you ideas - not your grammar mistakes. Feel more confident about the SAT and the ACT. Great for homeschooling, English as a Second Language (ESL) and studying for the TOEFL, too! Click to watch more grammar lessons: http://bit.ly/1LnJ1CN Don't forget to Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W ///////////////////////// We Recommend: Strunk and White (short and a classic) http://amzn.to/2nR1UqC Eats, Shoots & Leaves (funny! On punctuation) http://amzn.to/2ni5Myf Word Power Made Easy (vocab building) http://amzn.to/2ohddVP ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// Grammar Girl: Liliana de Castro Directed by Michael Harrison Written & Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison
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Top 23 #062: Abbreviations of old script
 
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Host: Barry J. Ewell (http://barrysblog.mygenshare.com/) Top 23 lessons genealogists need to know #062: Abbreviations of old script, is a tip for helping the genealogist simplify the process of reading and translating old script.
Просмотров: 79 Barry J. Ewell
Punctuation Explained (by Punctuation!) | Scratch Garden
 
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BIG NEWS EVERYONE: Punctuation has their own book! Learn more here: http://scratchgarden.com/book/ Learn about punctuation from punctuation themselves! Primary Teaching Points: punctuation, proper usage of period, question mark, exclamation mark, and comma THIS VIDEO NOW HAS A GREAT SUPPLEMENTAL LEARNING POSTER! https://scratchgarden.com/shop/item/punctuation-poster/ Related Videos: Contractions! - https://youtu.be/gubPH3WEurg You can now download our videos ad-free! ▶ https://wayokids.com/scratchgarden OUR FIRST BOOK IS NOW AVAILABLE! http://amzn.to/2Fm2B0L Support us on Patreon! ▶ https://www.patreon.com/scratchgarden Website: https://www.scratchgarden.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/scratchgarden Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scratchgarden Twitter: https://twitter.com/scratchgarden
Просмотров: 1161575 Scratch Garden
i-Teach-u English Mobile Phone Words
 
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i-Teach-u ENGLiSH 29 Text words for your Mobile Phone. These are text abbreviations for your MOBILE Phone = Text messages. This lesson will take you through 80 sets of initials & give full meaning of them so you can use them on your TEXT MESSAGING MOBILES. These initials are called acronyms. example LOL obviously laughing out loud or SWL screaming with laughter CRBT crying real big tears. and so on. One mistake made "AFIK = as far as I know" should be AFAIK. Sorry about that. You can't get the staff.
Просмотров: 1675 JackBarnett21
LIVE English Lesson - 1st OCT 2017 - Learning English  - grammar - childhood - abbreviations
 
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Learn English Live - Live English Lesson stream - 1st October 2017. It's a new month. Today we will talk about childhood memories. (Good and Bad) We will see that Duncan and Steve looked like as children. It really feels like autumn today, so we will take a look at some autumn scenes. We also have the mystery idioms. We will go into the garden to do a big chore. What is an initialisation? What is an acronym?Live chat is open for you to send your messages directly to me...live as live can be. Mr Steve will also be here with some flash words and live in the studio to chat with you as well. AUTUMN LESSON - https://youtu.be/Js0BtV7_Eyw SUPERCHAT $ to help support these lessons. Make a Patreon donation here - https://www.patreon.com/misterduncan Misterduncan's PLAYLISTS Ask Misterduncan - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAD0A8CFF102D5CF2 Lessons 1 to 91- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF467B6C12B713A03 Full English - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DYX8jVA_kcIpQuRBXcf2XIZ English Topic - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DaUGBc2dP0bSbgCtpkiCnT7 PAST LIVE ENGLISH STREAMS - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DbsIVnI4jp9mmwDHbICa2_d WORD STOP - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8AC561C1AE953017 May days - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DaKQi3YG30D_NyX881Wsiln Dunctober - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DY7Olv13JrMwgdKsJ0Xwohq December drop in - https://www.youtube.com/playlistlist=PLbvnlSJNf_DY7bb_xeLDzKPEJLzN4Z3io Xmas lessons - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbvnlSJNf_DYGEKPZ5Q1_CVxLbsH4tjVv My life in China and England - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL44BC10EEFAC0AF40 Other English lessons - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8B3F18AC104C9F46
Просмотров: 14351 Speak English With Misterduncan
What is SAP? Why do we need ERP? Beginner Tutorial
 
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http://www.guru99.com/what-is-sap.html This tutorial introduces the need for an ERP System with the help of a scenario. This course compares de-centralized information systems with centralized information systems also known as ERP. SAP is the most popular and widely implemented ERP system. This video course is beginner friendly! Click on the time points below to view different sections! 0:07 Why ERP is required? 2:00 Types of Enterprise Systems: De-centralized information systems and Centralized information systems 4:30 Problems with Decentralized Information Systems 5:20 Centralized Information Systems 7:16 Benefits of Centralized System What is SAP? SAP stands for Systems Applications and Products in Data Processing. SAP can be defined or categorized as an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) software. Like, share and subscribe our channel for more videos. Enjoy our free tutorial on our YouTube channel and our website. Watch more videos on our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC19i1XD6k88KqHlET8atqFQ READ related book like SAP MM book on Amazon by viewing at http://amzn.to/2gZH5Wb Visit our website for more! www.guru99.com FACEBOOK! Would you prefer to watch more about us? Like our page for more https://www.facebook.com/guru99com/ TWITTER! Tweet for us on Twitter with #guru99 and follow us on https://twitter.com/guru99com THANKS! We appreciate you reading this and hope you have a wonderful day! Sincerely, Guru99
Просмотров: 1589569 Guru99
IELTS: What you need to know 1. Abbreviations
 
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Have you ever wondered if you can you abbreviate words like kilometres or minutes in the IELTS listening test? Let IELTS specialist, Pete Jones, tell you the answer. This is the first in a series of 12 videos looking at useful information for those taking their IELTS test.
Просмотров: 12729 IELTS Official
Asking & Giving directions in English - English Vocabulary Lesson (ESL)
 
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Asking & Giving directions in English? - English Vocabulary Lesson (ESL) In this lesson, Niharika teaches you how to give directions correctly when you are approached by strangers. The quickest/easiest way is : To keep it simple and crisp, you could start by saying 'the quickest/easiest way is to...' Common verbs : 1. Go (left, right, straight, down, up, through) Examples : go left, go straight, go down the hill/slope, go up the hill/slope, go through the tunnel. 2. Take road name : you can also take the road name/number Examples : Take road 1, take the Avenue road. 3. Turn (right/left) : You can say 'turn right/left' if the person is driving as he would need to turn his steering wheel in a particular direction. 4. Stay on + the road name + distance/time Example : You turn left and stay on Avenue road for 5 kms/ ten minutes. There are other things you can mention while giving directions to people. Use transition words : as they make it easier for the people to find their way through. After that : you take road 1. Then : turn right. Next : you will see a bakery shop. When you get to : the bakery, you go down the hill. Finally : And finally, you will reach the new mall. Landmarks : are important/popular/well known buildings, cinemas, restaurants etc. Examples : You will the City hospital on your left. (the hospital is well known in that area) Across the Cookies and Morebakery . (the bakery is popular in that area) Warnings : It is important to give warnings to people while giving directions. This would help them to know what they have deal with own their way to their destination. Examples : It's a on way lane. It's a very busy road. There might be road repairs. Remember, make yourself clear, repeat if you need to so that he knows how to get there without being confused. What if you don't know the correct directions ? There are times you may not know how to give people directions because you are new in the city/area, or you haven't heard of the place that he wants to reach. Don't be rude by shrugging your shoulders and walking away. You could always say : I'm sorry. I'm not from here so I don't know my way around. I'm afraid. I can't help you.
English Grammar lesson - Types of Adverbs and their position in a sentence
 
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English Grammar lesson - Types of Adverbs and their position in a sentence Blog : http://www.learnex.in/english-grammar-lesson-types-of-adverbs In this English grammar lesson by Niharika you will learn how types of adverbs are placed in a sentence. So what are adverbs? Adverbs tell us How, when, where something is done or performed, in other words it tells us more about verbs. In this English grammar lesson we will look at how to place adverbs in the start, middle and at the end of a sentence. Website : http://www.letstalkpodcast.com Facebook page : http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast Start of a sentence (Initial position) The adverbs used at the beginning of the sentence are connecting adverbs and time adverbs. • Life is hard. However, life can be fun. (In this sentence the adverb ‘however’ is connecting two phrases. It’s a connecting adverb) Some of the connect adverbs are – However, next, Still, consequently…) • Tomorrow I will visit my mom. ( in this sentence ‘Tomorrow’ is a time adverb and is telling us when you will visit your mom) Adverbs in middle position of a sentence. The adverbs that are placed in the middle of a sentence are called ‘focusing adverbs’. They are generally used to modify the second part of a sentence. The adverbs which fall in the middle of a sentence are mostly – adverbs of frequency , adverbs of certainty and adverbs of comment. • She never forgets to call her sister. (In this sentence the adverb ‘never’ is used as an adverb of frequency) • I’ll certainly buy a copy of this book. ( In this sentence the adverb ‘certainly’ is the adverb of certainty) • At the conference she intelligently answered all her critics. ( In this sentence ‘intelligently ‘ is the adverb of comment) Adverbs at the end of a sentence The adverbs that are usually placed at the end of a sentence are – Adverbs of manner, Adverbs of place and Adverbs of time • John does his homework carefully. ( In this sentence ‘carefully’ is the adverb of manner) • I’m working in the garden outside. ( In this sentence ‘outside’ is the adverb of place) • Frank likes relaxing at home on weekends. ( In this sentence ‘weekends’ is the adverb of time) We hope this English grammar lesson has helped you to learn how to place different types of adverbs at various positions in a sentence. Keep practicing and keep learning English.
English Conversation: The Meaning of Hand Gestures
 
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Have you noticed that you make hand gestures while speaking your native language? Body movement during conversation can give off social clues that are particular to a certain culture. But when people learn a language, they often forget to learn the words and expressions that we make with our hands. You may find that a hand gesture in your culture has a different meaning in English-speaking countries. In this lesson, I will teach you common hand gestures used when speaking English. Take the quiz to test your understanding: http://www.engvid.com/english-conversation-the-meaning-of-hand-gestures/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you all about how we use our hands in English. So there are many ways we use our hands in English. I'm going to teach you a lot of different ways we use them. A lot of students get very confused with this, because the way we use our hands varies from culture to culture, so what we do in Canada and England and the U.S. might be very different than with what you do in your country. Okay? So pay close attention to these differences. So to start with, let's look at: "knock on wood". If you're living in an English-speaking country, you may have noticed sometimes people have a wooden object or a desk, a table, something made of wood, and they knock on it. Okay? You might wonder: "What does this mean, knock on wood?" In English tradition, if you say something good, for example: "I did very, very well on my test. I killed my test. I did amazing on my test", you might knock on wood to make sure that you don't jinx it. Okay? I'll give you another example. Imagine if I want to go on a picnic, and I'm a little afraid about rain, I might say: "Oh, you know, today's supposed to be a very sunny day. Knock on wood." I'm knocking on wood to prevent rain. Okay? So it's a superstition we do in order to kind of protect ourselves from the opposite happening. Okay? One last example: -"How did your interview go? How did your job interview go?" -"Oh, it went well." [Knocks] Okay, so that's why we knock on wood, it's a superstition. All right, let's look at some of these other ones. "Quotes". A lot of students have asked me: "What does this mean?" Okay? So, for example, somebody might say: "Yeah, she's beautiful." Or: "He's really smart." This kind of has a sarcastic tone to it. It means somebody has said somebody is beautiful, but you don't believe it. Or somebody has said somebody is smart, but you don't believe it. So if you hear someone saying something, and you're, you know, pretty much using their words but you don't believe it, you can do quotes. Okay? Another example: "Yeah that movie was awesome." Okay? So it means you don't believe it. English is fun. Your teachers might tell you English is fun. When you're talking to your friends, you might say: "English is fun", if you don't believe it. All right, the next one: "crazy". All right? In English, if we think someone is crazy, we go... Okay? So, for example: "That guy, he's very..." [Clicks tongue] It means he's very crazy. Okay? "Fingers crossed". A lot of the times in English, we take our fingers and we cross them, and we go like this. This means we're hoping something happens. Okay? So, for example: I hope you like this video, fingers crossed. Or: I hope I did well on the test, fingers crossed. Okay? So this means you hope something is happening. Now, this is a little different from if you take your finger and you put it behind your back. If you take your finger... Your fingers crossed and you put it behind your back, it means you're telling a lie. So, for example: "Oh, I loved the movie you made. The movie you made was incredible." If my fingers are behind my back, it means I'm lying to you. "I never talk to that guy." Okay? Fingers behind my back, it means I'm lying. Okay? Now, this one you might know, I think it's a very common one: "OK". It can also mean: "nice work" or "A-OK". So that means something has gone well. We have this one which is a very rude one. This, which means... And sorry, I'm not doing this to you; I'm just teaching it. This means "up yours", which pretty much in English means "fuck you". Okay? So if you ever see somebody going like that, it's not polite. It means up yours or fuck you. Oh, we have one... Two more. "Peace sign". Okay, when we're talking about peace in English, we often go: "Peace." So this is against war. In the 1960s, there were people called Hippies, they were always going: "Peace." This is very different than the V sign, this. Peace is like this, the V sign is like this. The V sign is something that is almost the same as this. In England, in Australia, in New Zealand, if you do this to somebody, you're pretty much telling them: "Fuck you." Okay? So be careful. "Peace", versus "Fuck you."
Просмотров: 697538 Learn English with Emma [engVid]
English Pronunciation: How to say words ending in -OUGH & -AUGH
 
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Learn how to say these difficult words correctly in English! Does "cough" rhyme with "off" or with "cow"? How about "drought", "laugh", and "through"? How would you pronounce these words? I understand these may confuse you, because the pronunciations are different depending on the word. In this lesson, we will look at the different sounds of words with the endings "-ough" and "-augh". This lesson will improve your speaking and listening skills, so be sure to watch and complete the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/english-pronunciation-how-to-say-words-ending-in-ough-augh/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's lesson we're going to look at words that generally confuse people, especially when it comes time to say them, words that have the "ough" or the "augh" inside them. And the reason they're confusing is because they don't sound anything like they look. Now, this is a common problem in English. English is not a phonetically-spelled language. In other languages, the way a word looks is the way it sounds. In English, not so much. So we're going to look at the different sounds that you can have with these letters. And the thing you're going to have to remember is: This is about memorization. Now, I know that some of you are asking me: "Well, why do I say it like this?" or "Why do I say it like that?" I don't know. I'm sorry to tell you that. There is no answer. You have to remember each word, how it's pronounced, and just remember it, and use it, and practice it, etc. So if you look here, you'll notice that I have eight different sounds for "ough" or "augh". Okay? Let's start with "uff", "uff": "tough", "rough", "enough". So, even though it's "o-u-g-h", there's no "ough". Okay? That... There's no such sound as "ough" in English. All of these have a specific sound. We're starting with "uff": "tough", "rough", "enough". Now, this word I'm going to get back to in one second. Okay? Let's look at the next one. "Oo". Very straight: "oo". "Through", like you go through the wall. If you're going really fast and you break through the wall, you're through. "Ghoul", "ghoul". A ghoul like is a some... Is like a... An animal that waits... Or it's like a mystical or... Sorry. A fictional animal that waits for somebody to die and gets pleasure out of other people's death. When people, for example, if you're driving on the highway and you see a really bad car accident and you slow down to have a look, people might call you a ghoul because you want to see blood, you want to see death. Not a good word, but that's how it's pronounced. "Ghoul", "oo". Now, let's go back to this word. The reason why I put it in the middle here is because this word actually has two meanings, each one pronounced differently: "slough", "slough". Okay? Different meanings. Sl-... It's not a word you're going to use very often, but "slough" is a... It's basically like a marsh, like a very wet area. It's not a lake, it's not a pond. There's a lot of weeds and lots of plant in it, and it's very thick, but that's... Another word for that is "slough". "Slough", now, a lot of people will write it like this: "slew". Especially American English, you can spell it like that. "Slough" means a lot. So: "He's got a slough of problems", means he's got a lot of problems. This is more common usage, but again, you're going to see this more often than you're going to see that. But if you do see that, like if you're reading British English, for example, you're going to see that. Just understand in context which word it is, "slough" or "slough". Okay. Next: "af". So notice I'm using the "a" here, not the "o", so that gives you a little bit of a hint, but not exactly because we're going to look at something else. "Laugh", everybody knows "laugh", hahaha. Right? And "draught". Now, again, American English, they don't bother, they just spell it like that, "draft", exactly how it sounds, exactly as it looks. But "draught" has different meanings. One, you can have a draught beer, like a beer from the keg. You can drink that, draught beer. There's also a draught, like a drawing. Like an architect, for example, when he... When he or she designs a building they make a draught of the plans, and once everything's agreed and everything's settled then they make the actual final plans. You can also have draughts of your essays. First draught, second draught. You make all the edits and changes, and you get to the end. So, "af", and the "t" we're going to come back to... Remember that "t", we're going to talk about that in a second. Now, "up". There's only one word that sounds like "up", and it's spelt with an "ough". [Hiccoughs]. Oop, sorry, that was a hiccough. Okay? Again, American English will spell it like this: "hiccup". British English will spell it like this, but they sound the same. "Hiccough". Okay.
Teaching Children Acronyms & Abbreviations : English & Grammar
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation Teaching children acronyms and abbreviations is something that you can do in a few key ways depending on the age of the child. Learn about teaching children acronyms and abbreviations with help from a professional development expert in this free video clip. Expert: Cristina Gutierrez-Brewster Bio: Cristina Gutierrez-Brewster has successfully improved the reading and writing skills of fifth-through-eighth grade, inner-city youths for six years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz Series Description: Learning more about grammar and the English language in general will allow you to more accurately and succinctly express yourself in the form of the written word. Learn about various aspects of English and grammar with help from a professional development expert in this free video series.
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IELTS Listening: TIPS for Diagram/Map Labelling tasks-english video
 
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In this video I examine diagram and map labelling tasks of the IELTS Listening. I also share with you some general tips that it would be good to follow during your preparation. Every example used in the video is the result of my own work. Free IELTS preparation: http://www.dori-ielts.com GET 7+ IN IELTS GUARANTEED! CLICK HERE TO GET A SPECIAL DISCOUNT: https://allearsenglish.clickfunnels.com/3-keys-and-dori Share this video: http://youtu.be/JHt5iUiXczU Subscribe to my channel for more: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsmXS9d8ewMCAornvNuukVQ Add my G+page: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/115386738814127946209/115386738814127946209 Like my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/english.lessons.568 Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/englishwithdori COPYRIGHT dori-ielts.com. All rights reserved. © 2015
Просмотров: 160285 English Lessons with Dori
Learn English Vocabulary: Compound Adjectives to describe people
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Do you know what a 'compound adjective' is? In today's lesson, I will teach you some very common compound adjectives to describe people. Native speakers use these expressions a lot in everyday conversation. Knowing these compound adjectives will help you understand spoken English, and will help you to speak English more fluently. Make sure you understood the lesson by taking the quiz. Good luck! http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-compound-adjectives/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some new words. These words are all compound adjectives. So what is a compound adjective? Well, a compound adjective is when you have two different words together with a hyphen. English is full of compound adjectives. I'm going to teach you maybe eight compound adjectives that all have to do with people's personalities. So if you're describing a friend, a roommate, your family, these are the types of words you can use. So let's get started The first word I want to teach you is "open-minded", okay? "Open-minded". Students have a lot of trouble with the pronunciation of this word. Many students say, "I have" or "I am open-mind"; "I am open-mind." No. You need "open-minded", -ED. Students always forget the "-ED" at the end. So be aware. Be careful. What does it mean to be "open-minded"? If you are open-minded, it means you like to try new things. When something happens, when you have an opportunity to try something new, you will do it. You're a "yes person". If somebody says, "Do you want to eat a spider?" Well, this might be extreme. But in some cultures, they eat spiders. They might ask you, "Do you want to eat a spider?" If you're open-minded, you'll say, "Sure. Yeah. Let's try it." You know, that's a little extreme. There are other cases of being open-minded. Here's another example. "I try to eat the local food because I'm open-minded." Okay? So you like to try new things. You are open-minded. Maybe you have never been outside of your country. If you go to a new country, maybe you'll notice there are differences in the culture. If these differences aren't upsetting to you, if you're willing to meet new people, try new things, learn new ways of living, you are "open-minded". The opposite of "open-minded" -- just like you open a door -- "closed", "closed-minded". So be careful with the pronunciation of this. "Closed-minded." So it's not close-ed-minded". "Closed-minded." If you are "closed-minded", you don't like to try new things. Trying new things is very uncomfortable for you. So for example -- or thinking in new ways. You don't want to change the way you live. You don't want to think in new ways. You're very traditional, and you don't like change. You are "closed-minded". "My mother won't try anything new. She is closed-minded." Okay? So if somebody doesn't want to change, is very uncomfortable with other cultures, other ideas, they are "closed-minded". Another "minded" compound adjective, "absent-minded". "Absent" -- you might have heard this word before. If you are not in class, you are "absent"; the teacher will mark you absent. Okay? So when you're absent, you're not there. "Absent-minded" is when your brain is not there. What does this mean? Well, it means you are thinking about something different, so you don't see what's happening. Here's an example to help you understand. I have a friend. My friend, her name is Lara. She is very absent-minded. She's always thinking about boys. Always thinking about her boyfriend, boy troubles. So because of that, sometimes, she forgets to do her homework. She's too busy thinking about one thing. She doesn't realize what's happening around her. She is "absent-minded". So, "Lara is absent-minded. She forgot to do her homework." So you're not thinking about something. You're absent-minded. Your mind is elsewhere. Another expression, very common expression, "laid-back". "Laid-back." What does it mean to be "laid-back"? Well, this is a very positive expression. It's a good expression. And it means you're a very relaxed person; you don't get angry; you don't get annoyed; you're very calm, relaxed, you go with the flow. You're a very happy, laid-back person. For example, I told you my friend Lara, she's very absent-minded. She's always forgetting to do her homework because she thinks too much about boys. Well, her teacher is a very laid-back teacher. When she doesn't do her homework, her teacher does not get angry. He does not yell at her and say, "Lara, why didn't you do your homework?" No. He's laid-back. He says, "Oh, it's okay. That's fine. It's okay that you didn't do your homework." He doesn't the get angry. He is laid-back. So let's look at some more compound adjectives.
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