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Amiodarone (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Amiodarone is primarily chosen for ACLS as the first-line antiarrhythmic agent for cardiac arrest because it has reliably and clinically shown effectiveness in improving the rate of return of spontaneous circulation otherwise known as ROSC. Amiodarone is a drug that can prolong AV conduction, the AV refractory period and QRS and Q-T intervals, which ultimately slows the heart rate. When using Amiodarone to treat Vfib or pulseless VTach cardiac arrest, the first dose is 300 mg IV/IO push. The second dose is delivered at 150mg IV/IO push. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 7297 ProCPR
Pharmacology - ANTIARRHYTHMIC DRUGS (MADE EASY)
 
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Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/speedpharmacology Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SpeedPharmacology/ Get Speed Pharmacology Merch Here: https://teespring.com/stores/speed-pharmacology **************************************************************************************************** Topics covered include: cardiac conduction system, SA node, AV node, bundle of His, bundle branches, purkinje fibers, cardiac action potential, pacemaker cells, conducting cells, contractile cells, mechanisms of arrhythmias, bradycardia, tachycardia, abnormal automaticity, triggered activity, Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia, Vaughan-Williams classification, class I (A, B, C), class II, class III, class IV antiarrhythmic drugs. Antiarrhythmics mentioned include: Procainamide, Quinidine, Disopyramide, Lidocaine, Mexiletine, Flecainide, Propafenone, Propranolol, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Esmolol, Amiodarone, Dronedarone, Sotalol, Dofetilide, Ibutilide, Verapamil, Diltiazem, Digoxin, Adenosine, and Magnesium sulfate. Source of the animation of the cardiac conducting system: http://www.passmyexams.co.uk/GCSE/biology/cardiac-conduction-system.html
Просмотров: 291490 Speed Pharmacology
Cardiac Arrest Pharmacology
 
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This lecture covers the critical drugs used in cardiac arrest management and is part of the UCDHS module for code blue training.
Просмотров: 16796 UCDavis
Epinephrine (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Epinephrine, commonly known as Adrenaline, is a drug that narrows blood vessels and opens airways in the lungs. These effects can reverse severe low blood pressure. Epinephrine is used in Cardiac arrest arrhythmias such as VF, pulseless VT, Asystole and PEA. It can also be used in symptomatic bradycardia. In addition, Epinephrine is an effective treatment for Anaphylaxis. Epinephrine is available in 1:10,000 or 1:1,000 concentrations. For cardiac arrest, Epinephrine should be delivered IV/IO at 1 mg which is 10 ML of 1:10,000 solution administered every 3 to 5 minutes during resuscitation. For treatment of anaphylactic shock Epinephrine 1:1,000 is given to a 30 kg or greater patient: 0.3 mg IM or subcutaneously. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 8983 ProCPR
Lidocaine (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Lidocaine brings about negative inotropic effects and antiarrhythmic actions in the heart which weaken the force of muscular contractions and can calm erratic and uncoordinated electro-myocardial activity. It’s primary use is for cardiac arrest from ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT). For cardiac arrest from VF or pulseless VT, the initial dose is 1 to 1.5 mg/kg IV or IO. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 6175 ProCPR
Antiarrhythmic Drugs
 
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This is a brief overview of antiarrhythmic agents, or drugs used to resolve abnormal cardiac rhythms. I created this presentation with Google Slides. Image were created or taken from Wikimedia Commons I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor. ADDITIONAL TAGS Class IA antiarrhythmic agent Moderate sodium s, which s action potential duration Quinidine side effects blocks hERG , which results long QT and can cause torsades de pointes Procainamide Less prolongation QT segment, less TdP Disopyramide s force contraction heart Side effects: constipation, urinary retention, glaucoma IB antiarrhythmic Mild sodium s, which s action potential duration Lidocaine Intravenous only Mexiletine Can be administered orally IC antiarrhythmic Marked sodium s, doesn’t change action potential duration Flecainide Possibly produces an ventricular arrhythmias Propafenone Some beta er effects (bradycardia and cardiac inotropy) addition to changing AP duration by changing Na influx, Is also: phase 4 depolarization threshold potential sub degree Na+ AP duration change Beta-adrenergic receptor ers (beta ers) catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine) Reduces myocardial need for oxygen, can ischemia slope phase 4 depolarization s self-generated rhythmic firing heart (s automaticity) Prolong repolarization AV node → reentry Effectively s refractory period III antiarrhythmic s potassium s (delayed-rectifier potassium (DRK) s) Prolongs repolarization (phase 3) Amiodarone, Sotalol, Ibutilide, D etilide, Dronedarone III: Amiodarone Wide range effects through many mechanisms s sinus node firing s automaticity s reentrant circuits s Na, K, and Ca s ( I, III, IV antiarrhythmics) s alpha and beta ( II) adrenergic receptors → vasodilation and d intropy Treats many tachyarrhythmias: atrial flutter, atrial fibrillation, vtach, ventricular flutter, SVT Pharmacokinetically unique: absorbed slowly, deposits adipose tissue Half life 25-60 days → cannot easily diminish or reverse effects Side effects: pulmonary (pneumonia, pul fibrosis); cardiac (brady, arrhythmias, long QT, TdP); thyroid (due to iodine); GI; CNS Amiodarone Wide range effects through many mechanisms sinus node firing; s automaticity; s reentrant circuits; Na, K, and Ca alpha and beta adrenergic receptors vasodilation and intropy Treats many tachyarrhythmias: atrial flutter, atrial fibrillation, vtach, ventricular flutter, SVT Pharmacokinetically unique: absorbed slowly, deposits adipose tissue Half life 25-60 days Side effects: pulmonary (pneumonia, pul fibrosis); cardiac (brady, arrhythmias, long QT, TdP); thyroid (due to iodine); GI; CNS High rates torsades de pointes Dronedarone (amiodarone analog without iodine) Gastrointestinal side effects but not TdP Sotalol Calcium L-type Ca2+ Most effective cells dependant on Ca (SA, AV nodes) transmission through AV node (for rapid atrial pulses) Terminates reentrant rhythms Treats AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (primary treatment) Side effects: hypotension and heart failure pts taking beta-ers Diltiazem and Verapamil Digoxin Inhibits activity sodium potassium pump (Na+-K+ ATPase inhibitor) Treats heart failure complicated with atrial fibrillation (by decreasing heart rate) s vagal tone; reduces sympa tic activity Opens potassium (K+ activator) Intravenously with saline flush (short 10 s half life) Hyperpolarizes cells Allows for rapid termination reentrant supraventricular tachycardia chemical defibrillator
Просмотров: 86958 MedLecturesMadeEasy
Antiarrhythmic Drugs, Animation
 
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Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: https://www.patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia/posts The 5 classes of agents according to Vaughan Williams classification, mechanism of action. This video and other related images/videos (in HD) are available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/cardiology-and-vascular-diseases ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Voice by: Sue Stern. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. ANTI-Arrhythmic agents are drugs used to SUPPRESS abnormal rhythms of the heart. They act to either: - interfere with the dynamics of cardiac action potentials by blocking a certain ion channel, or - block the sympathetic effects of the autonomic nervous system on the heart, to slow down heart rate. There are 5 classes of antiarrhythmic drugs: - Class I: Sodium-channel blockers: these drugs bind to and block the fast sodium channels that are responsible for the DE-polarizing phase in contractile myocytes. The result is a SLOWER depolarization with a smaller amplitude. This REDUCED conduction velocity helps to SUPPRESS formation of re-entrant circuits, hence the use of these drugs for treating re-entrant tachycardias. Class I agents are divided further into subclass IA, IB and IC. These subclasses differ in the STRENGTH of sodium channel blockage, and in their effect on the duration of action potentials and the effective refractory period, the ERP. While subclass IC has no effect on ERP, IA prolongs and IB shortens ERP, respectively. Changes in ERP may have different outcomes for different types of arrhythmias. A longer ERP generally reduces cardiac excitability, but prolonged repolarizations may increase the risk of torsades de pointes, a type of tachycardia caused by afterdepolarizations. - Class II: Beta-blockers: these drugs bind to beta1-adrenergic receptors and block the sympathetic influences that act through these receptors. Sympathetic nerves release catecholamines which act to increase SA node firing rate and cardiac conductibility, especially at the AV node. Useful in treatment of tachycardias that originate upstream of the AV node, known as supraventricular tachycardias, or SVT. - Class III: Potassium-channel blockers: these agents block the potassium channels responsible for the repolarizing phase. The result is a SLOWED repolarization, hence a PROLONGED duration of action potentials and refractory period. This reduces the heart’s excitability and suppresses re-entrant tachycardias. However, these drugs may also CAUSE arrhythmias because slow repolarizations are associated with LONGER QT intervals and INcreased risks of torsades de pointes. - Class IV: Calcium-channel blockers: these drugs block calcium channels that are responsible for DE-polarization in SA and AV nodal cells. Blocking these channels results in a LOWER sinus rate and SLOWER conduction through the AV node. However, because calcium is also involved in cardiac myocyte contraction, these agents also reduce contractility of the heart and should not be used in case of systolic heart failures. - Class V includes all drugs that act by other or unknown mechanisms.
Просмотров: 37567 Alila Medical Media
Drug Interactions #1
 
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What is an Enzyme Inducer? What is an Enzyme Inhibitor? What is a Pro-Drug? Karen Shapiro, PharmD, BCPS, Instructor. RxPrep, Inc. NAPLEX and CPJE Pharmacy Licensure Review Courses www.rxprep.com
Просмотров: 22059 RxPrep
Cardizem Drip! Nursing Drug tips! Nursing Calculation Tips!
 
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EmpoweRN.com Hi guys! Thank you so much for watching! I really hope you like this video that I made for you :) In this video I explain a situation that I went through as a nurse with a patient. These types of scenarios do not happen every day, but when they do, they are great learning experiences for us all! In this video particularly I go over a patient scenario describing an event where my patient went into rapid atrial fibrillation. This is very dangerous cardiac rhythm if not treated. There is a great medication called cardizem which can help slow down the rapid pace & potentially regulate the rhythm. I hope you love learning from my experiences and if you do please let me know by giving the video a thumbs up and/or posting a comment! As usual, I cannot wait to see you next week!! Lots of love, - Caroline Porter Thomas Disclaimer: These videos are intended for entertainment purposes only. Please follow the policy and procedures that your institution requires. Please note that the views, ideas & opinions expressed on this channel and in the videos on this channel are not necessarily of those of my employer or institution. The views expressed on this channel and in the videos channel do not represent medical advice. If you have specific medical concerns, please contact your physician. In order to protect patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all videos have been deleted or altered. The views expressed on this channel and in the videos on this channel are personal opinions. I am not an expert nor do I dispense medical advice or procedural specifications. The information I present is for general knowledge and entertainment purposes only. You need to refer to your own medical director, teachers and protocols for specific treatment information. It is your responsibility to know how best to treat your patient in your jurisdiction.
Просмотров: 26408 EmpoweRN
Antiarrhytmics (Lesson 7 - How to Choose the Right Med and Classic Pitfalls)
 
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A discussion of how to choose the right antiarrhythmic to rate control and pharmacologically cardiovert atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, as well as converting and prevention of ventricular tachycardia. An overall summary of this series is also presented.
Просмотров: 8846 Strong Medicine
Amiodarone Nursing Considerations, Side Effects and Mechanism of Action Pharmacology for Nurses
 
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Grab our free cheatsheet covering the 50 most commonly prescribed medications right here: http://www.nrsng.com/50meds View full post: https://www.nrsng.com/amiodarone-cordarone/ Listen to all the episodes at: https://www.nrsng.com/medmaster-podcast/ Amiodarone Generic Name: Amiodarone Trade Name: Cordarone Indication a-fib, ventricular arrhythmias, SVT, ACLS protocol for v-fib and v-tach Action: prolongs phase 3 of the action potential, makes the heart more tolerant to arrythmias, inhibits adrenergic stimulation, slows rate, decreases peripheral vascular resistance causing vasodilation Therapeutic Class: antiarrhythmic class III, potassium channel blocker Pharmacologic Class: none Nursing Considerations  may lead to ARDS, pulmonary toxicity, CHF, bradycardia, hypotension  increases risk for QT prolongation  increases digoxin levels  increases activity of warfarin  monitor EKG continuously while on therapy  assess for signs and symptoms of ARDS  monitor liver function test  check dosage with another RN  teach pt to monitor pulse daily and report abnormalities  avoid drinking grapefruit juice
Просмотров: 29033 NRSNG
Pharmacology of Amiodarone
 
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Mastering Medications : Amiodarone Want to Learn More? Join Our FREE Facebook Group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/1153328328045266/ Master Your Medics https://www.masteryourmedics.com/pages/about-us
Просмотров: 21759 Master Your Medics Geoff Murphy
USMLE Cardiovascular 4: Anti-Arrhythmia Pharmacology Part 2
 
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Welcome to LY Med, where I go over everything you need to know for the USMLE STEP 1, with new videos every day. Follow along with First Aid, or with my notes which can be found here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/xisbr5u8reifaqk/AAAEWF-Ho2r0OJMooCYN_bG-a?dl=0 Finally some pharmacology! Let's talk about anti-Arrhythmia! There are four classes of anti-Arrhythmia drugs. Two work on your nodal tissue. Let's quickly recap on how nodes depolarize! Hopefully you remember all the little details of the L-ca channels and funny sodium channels. Some new things to know, the more sodium channels you have the quicker your heart rate! This explains how sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation can increase or decrease heart rate. With this background information in hand, let's talk about some pharm. Class II Beta-blockers: These b-blockers will block the B1 adrenergic receptors of the heart and lower the heart rate and contractility. Class IV: These are your calcium channel blockers. This slows phase 0, the further depolarization of the cell. There are two types, dihydropyridines and non-dihydropyridines. All these work on your SA node as well as your AV node, which prolongs your PR interval and ERP. Now what are the two types of drugs that work on non-nodal tissue? Well before we do that, we'll recap it how it depolarize in the first place. These are tissues like the Purkinje fibers, Bundle of His, and ventricular myocytes. The first class that works here are class I Na sodium channel blockers. When you block sodum, you prolong phase 0. However you have three different classes because they also work on potassium K+ to different degrees. Type 1a prolongs K+ efflux and include drugs like procainamide (known for it's drug induced lupus), as well as quinidine. Ib hasten K+ efflux and is best used post-MI. Lastly you have class Ic which has no effect on potassium. This is contraindicated post-MI. Second class that works on these cells are class III, which work on your K+ mainly. This prolongs your action potential and QT, which predisposes you to long qt syndrome and torsades! You need to know the drug amiodarone, a very toxic drug that can cause thyroiditis, pulmonary fibrosis, and hepatotoxicity. The last drug we'll talk about is adenosine. Adenosine increases potassium efflux and stops your heart. Know some adenosine antagonists like caffeine and theophylline. Done with pharm!
Просмотров: 2268 LY Med
Pharmacology - Amiodarone Induced QT Prolongation - by Dr Busti
 
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This is a rapid review by Anthony Busti, MD, PharmD on the mechanism behind amiodarone induced prolongation of the QT interval on the ECG. To get full length lectures like this on hundreds of topics visit High Yield Med Reviews and choose one of our review courses or topic reviews for exams such as the NAPLEX, BCPS, and BCACP.
Просмотров: 1084 High-Yield Med Reviews
Cardiac meds made easy
 
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Просмотров: 118769 Josiah Shoon
Heart Failure pharmacology
 
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http://SimpleNursing.com 1,000 MORE Videos on NURSING School SUCCESS As simple as ABCD A- Ace Inhibitors B- Beta Blockers C- Calcium Channel Blockers D- Diuretics SimpleNursing.com "82% or higher on your next Nursing test."
Просмотров: 131334 Simple Nursing
Aspirin (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Aspirin is indicated in the presence of signs and symptoms of acute coronary syndromes such as those who are suffering from chest pain, pressure or discomfort including pain radiating into neck and jaw or down the right or left arm. Aspirin inhibits the sticking together of platelets and reduces clot formation. The use of Aspirin for myocardial infarctions helps to reduce death and the probability of reinfarction and stroke. The proper dose is to administer 2 to 4 chewable aspirin or 162-324 mg nonenteric coated as soon as possible after the onset of symptoms. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 1217 ProCPR
Mastering Medications : Lasix
 
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Mastering Medications : Lasix Want to Learn More? Join Our FREE Facebook Group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/1153328328045266/ Master Your Medics https://www.masteryourmedics.com/pages/about-us 400+ TOTAL Videos in 30 subjects, all in our exclusive membership http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com PASS EMT/Paramedic school RIGHT NOW! Over 6000 Paramedic/EMT Students HELPED!! 35 Full courses! http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com Advanced Pharmacology Course (30+ Videos) http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com Anatomy and Physiology Course (50+ Videos) http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com 4 Lead AND 12 Lead ECG Course (20+ Videos) http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com Acid - Base Course (10+ Videos) http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com Stop stressing out, and start mastering EMT and Paramedic School. https://www.masteryourmedics.com/pages/about-us Goals that MasterYourMedics strives towards - Slash your study time in HALF! - Actually RETAIN the knowledge you need. - PASS your exams with little stress! Stop stressing out every day of medic school, it’s time you had a mentor to teach you to the level of MASTERY. http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com EMT and Paramedic School is so stressful and tough. Master Your Medics will teach you to be the medic you always dreamed of being. Suggested Videos Mastering Cardiac Action Potential https://youtu.be/FaeJRnEVh5Q Mastering Cushings Triad https://youtu.be/6BPuPDDVXxc Mastering Diabetic Ketoacidosis https://youtu.be/bUoL_nBR-Hc
Просмотров: 4718 Master Your Medics Geoff Murphy
Magnesium Sulfate (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Magnesium Sulfate or sometimes nick-named Mag Sulfate, affects the SA Node by slowing down it’s impulse rate. It also reduces the automaticity in partially depolarized cells. Mag Sulfate is effective as an anti-convulsant/antiarrhythmic. It is used to treat Polymorphic V-tach with a pulse. It is recommended for use in cardiac arrest only if Torsades de Pointes or suspected hypomagnesemia is present. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 5929 ProCPR
Ventricular Drugs
 
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Просмотров: 42335 ACLS Certification Institute
Pulseless Arrest V-Fib Teaching (ACLS Algorithms)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 The key steps to treating V-Fib are a rapid assessment to confirm cardiac arrest, starting CPR, applying the defibrillator and delivering the first shock as soon as possible. High quality CPR needs to be performed with as few interruptions as possible by giving cycles of 30 compressions at a depth of 2 to 2.4 inches deep at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute followed by 2 breaths. The compressor needs to be changed every 2 minutes to avoid fatigue. After the initial shock an IV or IO needs to be established in order to give medications. The first medication would be epinephrine, 1 mg 1:10,000 IV or IO push every 3-5 minutes. After the initial dose of epinephrine and a second shock is given, you should consider placing an advanced airway with capnography. Remember that once an advanced airway is in place, CPR compressions become continuous at 100 to 120 compressions a minute, and one breath is given every 6 seconds. The next medication to give is amiodarone, 300 mg via rapid IV or IO push. A 150 mg dose of Amiodarone may repeated one time in 3-5 minutes. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 22263 ProCPR
Nursing Review: Amiodarone
 
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An assignment for MSN-Education program. N5319 Advanced Pharmacology Final Project: Amiodarone References Amiodarone. (n.d.). In Davis’s Drug Guide. Retrieved October 16, 2017, from https://www.drugguide.com/ddo/view/Davis-Drug-Guide/51041/all/amiodarone Cork, A. (2012, July 17). Heart Conduction System (Video File). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4x7-2HKtJ0 Epstein, A. E., Olshansky, B., Naccarelli, G. V., Kennedy, J. I., Murphy, E. J., & Goldschlager, N. (2016). Practical management guide for clinicians who treat patients with amiodarone. The American Journal of Medicine, 129(5), 468-475. doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2015.08.039 Giardina, E. & Passman, R. (2017). Clinical use of amiodarone. In B. C. Downey (Ed.), UpToDate. Retrieved October 15, 2017, from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/clinical-uses-of-amiodarone/ Kudenchuk, P. J., Brown, S. P., Daya, M., Rea, T., Nichol, G., Morrison, L. J., . . . Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Investigators. (2016). Amiodarone, lidocaine, or placebo in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The New England Journal of Medicine, 374(18), 1711. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1514204 Laina, A., Karlis, G., Liakos, A., Georgiopoulos, G., Oikonomou, D., Kouskouni, E., . . . Xanthos, T. (2016). Amiodarone and cardiac arrest: Systematic review and meta-analysis.International Journal of Cardiology, 221, 780-788. doi:10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.07.138 Link, M. S., Berkow, L. C., Kudenchuk, P. J., Halperin, H. R., Hess, E. P., Moitra, V. K., . . . Donnino, M. W. (2015). Part 7: Adult advanced cardiovascular life support: 2015 american heart association guidelines update for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care. Circulation, 132(18_suppl_2 Suppl 2), S444-S464. doi:10.1161/CIR.0000000000000261 Sanfilippo, F., Corredor, C., Santonocito, C., Panarello, G., Arcadipane, A., Ristagno, G., & Pellis, T. (2016). Amiodarone or lidocaine for cardiac arrest: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Resuscitation, 107, 31-37. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.07.235 Wells, B. G., Dipiro, J. T., Schwinghammer, T. L., & Dipiro, C. V. (Eds.). (2012). Pharmacotherapy Handbook (8th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Medical. Whalen, K. (2015). Lippincott illustrated reviews: pharmacology (6th ed.) (R. Finkel & T. A. Panavelil, Eds.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.
Просмотров: 63 Jessica Granger
Atropine (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Atropine reduces the activity of the parasympathetic nervous system. Atropine is the drug of choice to treat symptomatic sinus bradycardia and may be beneficial in the presence of atrio-ventricular nodal blocks. For bradycardia, the dosage for Atropine is 0.5 mg every 3-5 minutes as needed, not to exceed a total dose of .04 mg/kg to a total of 3mg. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 3583 ProCPR
Pharmacology - Loop Diuretics - Furosemide (Lasix) IV in Heart Failure - Dr Busti
 
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This is a focused review by Anthony Busti, MD, PharmD on reasons why we use furosemide IV instead of by mouth in patients with congestive heart failure. To get full length lectures like this on hundreds of topics visit High Yield Med Reviews and choose one of our review courses or topic reviews for exams such as the NAPLEX, BCPS, and BCACP.
Просмотров: 3342 High-Yield Med Reviews
Amiodarone, Lidocaine or placebo in out of hospital cardiac arrest
 
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INGLES MEDICO- Amiodarone, lidocaine and placebo in cardiac arrest
Просмотров: 82 Camila Santos Loor
Digoxin Nursing Considerations, Side Effects, and Mechanism of Action Pharmacology for Nurses
 
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Grab our free cheatsheet covering the 50 most commonly prescribed medications right here: http://NRSNG.com/50meds Listen to all the episodes at: https://www.nrsng.com/medmaster-podcast/ View the blog post here: https://www.nrsng.com/digoxin-lanoxin/ Digoxin Generic Name: digoxin Trade Name: Lanoxin Indication: CHF, A-fib, A-flutter Action Positive inotropic effect (increases force of myocardial contraction), prolongs refractory period, ↓ conduction through SA and AV nodes. Essentially digoxin is given to increase cardiac output and slow the rate. Therapeutic Class: antiarrhythmic, inotropics Pharmacologic Class: digitalis glycosides Nursing Considerations:  Excreted by kidneys  Assess patient for hypersensitivity  Contraindicated with uncontrolled ventricular arryhtmias  Hypokalemia increase risk for toxcicity  Hypercalcemia ↑ risk for toxicity  Use caution with diuretic use as they may cause electrolyte abnormalities that can lead to toxicity  Assess patient for cardiac arrythmias including bradycardia  Signs of toxicity include vision changes (blurred vision, yellow, green vision disturbances)  Monitor pulse rate for 1 full minute prior to dosing patient (hold for pulse less than 60)
Просмотров: 50382 NRSNG
CARDENE® I.V. (nicardipine hydrochloride) User Guide
 
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Please see full ISI: https://cardeneiv.com/important-safety-information/ Receive valuable information about CARDENE® I.V. (nicardipine hydrochloride) such as treatment guidelines, dosing & administration, common adverse events and clinical study efficacy results. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION CARDENE® I.V. (nicardipine hydrochloride) is contraindicated in patients with advanced aortic stenosis. Hypotension and reflex tachycardia may potentially occur during treatment with CARDENE I.V.; therefore, close monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate is required. If unacceptable hypotension or tachycardia occurs, the infusion should be discontinued. Slow titration of CARDENE I.V. is recommended in patients with heart failure or significant left ventricular dysfunction, particularly in combination with a beta-blocker. Close monitoring of response to CARDENE I.V. is advised in patients with angina, heart failure, impaired hepatic function, or renal impairment. CARDENE I.V. may elevate serum concentrations of cyclosporine or tacrolimus. Serum concentrations of cyclosporine or tacrolimus should be monitored during coadministration with CARDENE I.V. To reduce the possibility of venous thrombosis, phlebitis, local irritation, and extravasation, administer CARDENE I.V. through large peripheral veins or central veins rather than arteries or small peripheral veins. If CARDENE I.V. is administered in a peripheral vein, to minimize the risk of venous irritation, change the site of infusion every 12 hours. The most common adverse reactions (greater than 3%) are headache, nausea/vomiting, hypotension, and tachycardia. INDICATION CARDENE® I.V. (nicardipine hydrochloride) Premixed Injection is indicated for the short-term treatment of hypertension when oral therapy is not feasible or not desirable. For prolonged control of blood pressure, transfer patients to oral medication as soon as their clinical condition permits. Please see full prescribing information: http://bit.ly/CardenePI PP-CI-0070 V2.0
Просмотров: 2034 CARDENE® I.V. (nicardipine hydrochloride)
ACLS Epinephrine
 
03:14
ACLS Epinephrine Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support
Просмотров: 510 Nurse Ozz
ACLS Pharmacology
 
01:52
http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 The ACLS medications we will cover are only one part of a successful resuscitation. No medication will work the way we desire, unless a patient’s biological status is such that their body, at the cellular level will work the way we hope. As cellular hypoxia progresses to cellular death, the body’s ability to react to treatments becomes more and more difficult. This is why it’s important that we provide highly effective basic life support. BLS is the vital foundation of a successful ACLS outcome. As we refresh or learn the list of current ACLS medications, we will break the drugs down into 4 categories: The drug and its effect, it’s indications, precautions and contraindications, and the appropriate dosage. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 2376 ProCPR
Pulseless Arrest Ventricular Fibrillation Teaching (ACLS Algorithms)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos - This video is the latest version based on the latest 2017 guideline updates. **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 The key steps to treating V-Fib are a rapid assessment to confirm cardiac arrest, starting CPR, applying the defibrillator and delivering the first shock as soon as possible. High quality CPR needs to be performed with as few interruptions as possible by giving cycles of 30 compressions at a depth of 2 to 2.4 inches deep at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute followed by 2 breaths. The compressor needs to be changed every 2 minutes to avoid fatigue. After the initial shock an IV or IO needs to be established in order to give medications. The first medication would be epinephrine, 1 mg 1:10,000 IV or IO push every 3-5 minutes. After the initial dose of epinephrine and a second shock is given, you should consider placing an advanced airway with capnography. Remember that once an advanced airway is in place, CPR compressions become continuous at 100 to 120 compressions a minute, and one breath is given every 6 seconds. The next medication to give is amiodarone, 300 mg via rapid IV or IO push. A 150 mg dose of Amiodarone may repeated one time in 3-5 minutes. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 1835 ProCPR
Epinephrine Dosing for Beginners
 
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Medical students and beginning residents usually get mixed up when it comes to epinephrine dosing. Plus, truth be told, if you're giving epi, you are already in deep trouble and time is of the essence! So here's a short video to at least keep you straight on when you use concentrated epi and when you use dilute epi. Enjoy!
Просмотров: 41882 Dr. Gallagher's Neighborhood
Mastering Atropine
 
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Mastering Atropine Want to Learn More? Join Our FREE Facebook Group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/1153328328045266/ Transcript: Today we're talking about atropine at Master Your Medics. So atropine is an anticholinergic drug. It's indications is symptomatic bradycardia and also it's used in organophosphate poisonings to block the cholinergic effects of those. We're going to focus more on the symptomatic bradycardia because that's the more likely that you're going to be using atropine for. But, just so you know, it's used for organophosphate poisonings too. The contraindications are hypersensitivity. Does. Typically we see doses of 0.5 milligrams IV, cute three to five minutes as needed to a maximum of three milligrams. Now your protocols may be different obviously but that's just a standard that we see. Follow your protocols obviously of what's going on with atropine in your areas, but that's typically what you'll see. So as far as atropine goes, what it does is actually, it actually blocks muscarinic responses in acetylcholine. And so what that does is that it doesn't allow for severe introduction of parasympathetic response. Okay? And so remember, sympathic and parasympathetic responses, so sympathetic is your fight or flight so it's going to create a stimulus that's going to increase your heart, dilate your pupils, and so on and so forth. So what atropine will do is that it doesn't stimulate the sympathetic response, but what it does is it basically ... it doesn't allow for the parasympathetic response to push back so much. Okay? Because they're always keeping each other in check, the sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. And so what atropine does instead of allowing or pushing sympathetic response to create an effect it's actually just kneecapping parasympathetic response so the sympathetic response can take over. Okay? So it's not actually creating a sympathetic response and that's why it's anticholinergic as opposed to a sympathic. Okay and so what that does is that allows for an increased stimulus in the SA node and the AV node. So with symptomatic bradycardia, it allows for better conduction in those patients. Okay, so, you might have seen a note there that says, "Less effective in second degree type two and third degree blocks." And now the reason being is that if you look at the how it works is that it only allows for stimulus through the SA node and the AV node. Okay? Our pacemakers. And so what that means is that it's only going to work on stimuluses that are actually coming from above those nodes. Okay? And so in a second degree type two and a third degree block our bradycardia and our damages actually blow the AV node. Okay and so that's what's causing the symptoms and causing the damage is below the AV node. And so any type of stimulus with atropine won't, it's not going to be effective at increasing the heart rate or the symptoms of a patient in second degree type two or third degree blocks just simply because it can only stimulate the SA node and the AV node, it can't stimulate lower than those nodes, leaving second degree type twos and third degree blocks. Out of the picture for it ... but good for first degree blocks, sinus bradycardias, and it can be useful in second degree type ones. Again, that's where we're starting to get into the field where it's much less effective. Another note, as well, for the dose is that atropine can actually have the reverse effect if you under dose a patient. And so you'll see the dose as 0.5 milligrams. Well, that's actually what causes the effect that we want. If we under dose and say we give this patient 0.2 milligrams, atropine actually has the reverse effect on the body and it can cause even more bradycardia. So we want to make sure that we're using the right dose and making sure that we're going over 0.5 milligrams so we don't have a reverse effect in what we want. Master Your Medics https://www.masteryourmedics.com/pages/about-us
Просмотров: 17719 Master Your Medics Geoff Murphy
Adenosine (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Adenosine is indicated for narrow-complex supraventricular tachycardia or SVT, unstable narrow-complex reentry tachycardia, regular and monomorphic wide-complex tachycardia, and as a diagnostic maneuver for stable narrow-complex SVT. Adenosine is effective in terminating narrow complex SVT due to reentry involving the AV node or Sinus node. It’s important to note that Adenosine does not convert atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter or ventricular Tachycardia known as V-tach. The initial bolus of 6mg is given rapidly over 1 to 3 seconds followed by a normal saline bolus of 20ml. A second dose of 12mg can be given in 1 to 2 minutes if needed. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 3744 ProCPR
Mastering Cardiac Action potential
 
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Mastering Cardiac Action Potential Want to Learn More? Join Our FREE Facebook Group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/1153328328045266/ Video Transcript: Here's the first picture of the four phases. Four phases are needed in order to create a full firing, a full action potential. Four, that phase four that you see there, is pretty much the recovery, the repolarization before a firing actually occurs. And then you've got your zero, then the spike of one, plateau two, and then the repolarization phase of three. So let's talk about phase zero. Phase zero is when sodium fast gates open, and sodium rushes into the cell. We know that sodium is on the outside of the cell, the majority of it is on the outside of the cell. So when it gets triggered, when the cell gets triggered by, usually, another cell that's stimulating it, then sodium gates open and sodium rushes into the cell. This brings the negativity in the cell, the cell's typically negative, and it decreases the negativity. And once it decreases the negativity enough, it will create a firing. So the more sodium that rushes in, the closer and closer it gets to that threshold that creates an electrical response that creates an effect. So this means that we're getting closer to more positive. It's sitting around minus 90, negative, and that sodium rush in increases it to 70 or higher to create an electrical response. Negative 70 I should say. So that's what's happening, when it gets to that threshold, it fires, and that's why you're seeing a spike. It fires, as you're seeing with zero, this is the first part of the electrical response. Then you see that spike. This is when sodium is really rushing into the cell, and then that spike occurs, and the fast gates of sodium shut. Now we're at the spike, and we're kinda turning into the plateau, so how does it keep that plateau? What happens in the cells is that we actually have an increase in chloride. Chloride is increased inside the cell, which kinda keeps more of the plateau, it keeps the negativity, or the electrical response, where it's supposed to, and also we have an increase of calcium. Calcium is a crucial, crucial ion in this case, because what calcium does is it actually triggers actinomycin to contract. It physically allows for the myocardium to contract, it allows for that squeeze. That's what calcium's doing in the plateau. And so it creates that plateau, because now the body is pretty much just trying to level off the action potential so that way we get that plateau. Our body needs this in order to create squeeze, so that's why we have that plateau. Our body's really smart in increasing chloride, increasing calcium to create that physical squeeze, and prolong the action potential. And so this is the last part here, is that the third phase is repolarization. What happens here is that gates are opened up from the inside of the cell, and potassium is rushed out of the cell. This will bring the electricity even lower in the negative, and this brings the cell back to its normal state, back to its state before action potential occurred. So more and more potassium keeps running out until we finally get to the four. Phase four, and this is where the sodium potassium pumps come into play. It'll start to level off where the cell's supposed to be. And once it's leveled off, then the cell is ready to be fired again, and create more action potential. So when it gets stimulated again, the whole thing takes over again, and then we'll have sodium rush in again, it'll spike, at that spike we'll see chloride come in, calcium come in, create the plateau. And then after the plateau, potassium channels will open and potassium will be shifted outside the cell, and this will repolarize the action potential. And then we'll come back to the four and we'll do it all over again. That is cardiac action potential. So if you guys are using antiarrythmics, this is specifically what an antirrhythmic looks at. For example, we're gonna talk about amiodarone later this week. Amiodarone blocks potassium, and so what it does is that it actually prolongs phase three, it prolongs the plateau. What this does is it extends the refractory period, which means that it can't refire until after the refractory period. That's what amiodarone does, is it extends refractory periods, or blocks potassium, which extends phase three, or prolongs phase three. This is the kind of thing that antiarrythmics will do, is it'll target action potential with its effect. So if you have any questions please post them or email me. Again, like I said, this might be a little bit difficult for you to understand, so please understand ions and mastering electrolytes. There is a course on the membership that you guys can check out, would be really helpful.
Просмотров: 7961 Master Your Medics Geoff Murphy
Antiarrhythmics | Circulatory System and Disease | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Created by Bianca Yoo. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-cardiovascular-diseases/rn-dysrhythmia-and-tachycardia/v/ablation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-cardiovascular-diseases/rn-dysrhythmia-and-tachycardia/v/pacemakers?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Просмотров: 282641 khanacademymedicine
Cardiac Pharmacology for Paramedic Students II
 
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Antiarrhythmic classes part I.
Просмотров: 1003 TheAncientScholar
Dopamine (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Dopamine can be very effective in treating hypotension with signs and symptoms of shock. Dopamine is typically used as a second line drug for symptomatic bradycardia after atropine. Dopamine should be administered via IV and it’s most common infusion rate is 2 to 20 mcg/kg per minute. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 1351 ProCPR
Procainamide (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Procainamide is effective in slowing the conduction in the atria, ventricles and Bundle of HIS purkinje system. Procainamide has been effective for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia that returns after vagal maneuvers and adenosine were ineffective. It helps treat stable wide complex tachycardia of uncertain origin, stable monomorphic Ventricular tachycardia with normal QT interval, atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular rate response in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and recurrent Ventricular Fibrillation or pulseless V Tach. The use of Procainamide is limited in ACLS for cardiac arrest due to its requirement of slow infusion and somewhat unknown effectiveness. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 1356 ProCPR
Morphine Sulfate (ACLS Pharmacology)
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos **Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 Morphine is indicated for chest pain. It produces analgesia by binding to opioid receptors in the central nervous system. Morphine may be given to patients in 2 to 4 mg increments via slow IV push. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel! Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 6669 ProCPR
Sodium Bicarbonate
 
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Provided to YouTube by CDBaby Sodium Bicarbonate · Jamie Davis, the Podmedic EMT-I & EMT-Paramedic ALS Medication Review ℗ 2008 MedicCast Productions, LLC Released on: 2008-11-01 Auto-generated by YouTube.
Просмотров: 1069 Jamie Davis - Topic
How to Treat Heart Failure
 
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How to Treat Heart Failure Want to Learn More? Join Our FREE Facebook Group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/1153328328045266/ Master Your Medics https://www.masteryourmedics.com/pages/about-us 400+ TOTAL Videos in 30 subjects, all in our exclusive membership http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com PASS EMT/Paramedic school RIGHT NOW! Over 6000 Paramedic/EMT Students HELPED!! 35 Full courses! http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com Advanced Pharmacology Course (30+ Videos) http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com Anatomy and Physiology Course (50+ Videos) http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com 4 Lead AND 12 Lead ECG Course (20+ Videos) http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com Acid - Base Course (10+ Videos) http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com Stop stressing out, and start mastering EMT and Paramedic School. https://www.masteryourmedics.com/pages/about-us Goals that MasterYourMedics strives towards - Slash your study time in HALF! - Actually RETAIN the knowledge you need. - PASS your exams with little stress! Stop stressing out every day of medic school, it’s time you had a mentor to teach you to the level of MASTERY. http://masteryourmediccourses.thinkific.com EMT and Paramedic School is so stressful and tough. Master Your Medics will teach you to be the medic you always dreamed of being. Suggested Videos Mastering Cardiac Action Potential https://youtu.be/FaeJRnEVh5Q Mastering Cushings Triad https://youtu.be/6BPuPDDVXxc Mastering Diabetic Ketoacidosis https://youtu.be/bUoL_nBR-Hc
Просмотров: 4393 Master Your Medics Geoff Murphy
Amiodarone
 
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Amiodrarone is a Vaughan Williams class 3 antiarrhythmic. www.thepracticalparamedic.com Resources MLREMS standard of care protocols. Classification of Antiarrhythmic Agents http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/2172024-overview Amiodarone https://www.drugs.com/amiodarone.html Amiodarone (Rx) https://reference.medscape.com/drug/pacerone-cordarone-amiodarone-342296 Amiodarone: Guidelines for Use and Monitoring http://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/1201/p2189.html Amiodarone Hydrochloride—Drug Summary http://www.pdr.net/drug-summary/Cordarone-amiodarone-hydrochloride-997.5974#6
Просмотров: 1932 The Practical Paramedic
ACLS Secondary Survey H's and T's
 
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http://proacls.com - ACLS Certification Training Videos - Get $20 off your certification or recertification with the discount code youtubeacls2017 The most common underlying causes of cardiac arrest are presented as H's and T's. The H’s stand for hypovolemia, hypoxia, hydrogen ion or acidosis, hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, and hypothermia. The T's are tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, toxins, pulmonary thrombosis, and coronary thrombosis. Subscribe to ProTrainings' Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNywVU8TPBXCVFZ96Y11BLQ?sub_confirmation=1 Check out all of ProTrainings' courses: http://www.protrainings.com Like ProTrainings on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Twitter: https://twitter.com/protrainings Follow ProTrainings on Instagram: http://instagram.com/protrainings
Просмотров: 1300 ProCPR
Lidocaine bolus and infusion
 
05:43
Просмотров: 6094 Shelby Breiland
Amiodarone and You
 
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In ten minutes, what you need to know about administering Amiodarone (Cordarone) according to the 2010 AHA ECC Guidelines for ACLS.
Просмотров: 19272 RescueDigest
Dr.Ahmed Abd El-Rahman - Arrythmia - Anti-arrythmic Drugs
 
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Subject : Pharmacology Thursday - 12th, December 2013 Contents :- - Pathophysiology of Cardiac Dysrythmia - Phases of Cardiac Action Potential - Classification of Anti-arrythmic Drugs - Quinidine - Lidocaine - Phenytoin - Amiodarone
Просмотров: 6801 Kasr Al-Ainy - 3rd Year (2011-2017) Channel
Calcium Carbonate Nursing Considerations, Side Effects, Mechanism of Action Pharmacology for Nurses
 
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Grab our free cheatsheet covering the 50 most commonly prescribed medications right here: http://NRSNG.com/50meds Listen to all the episodes at: https://www.nrsng.com/medmaster-podcast/ View the blog post here: https://www.nrsng.com/calcium-carbonate-tums-rolaids/ Calcium carbonate Generic Name: calcium carbonate Trade Name: Tums / Rolaids Indication: treatment of hypocalcemia, prevention of post menopausal osteoporosis, treatment of hyperkalemia and hypermagnesaemia, used as antacid Action: calcium is essential for nervous, muscular, and skeletal systems, helps maintain cell membranes, aids in transmission of nerve impulses and muscle contraction, aids in blood formation and coagulation Therapeutic Class: mineral and electrolyte replacements/supplements Pharmacologic Class: antacids Nursing Considerations:  may cause cardiac arrest and arrhythmias  monitor hemodynamics  may causes hypotension, bradycardia, and arrhythmias  hypercalcemia can increase risk for digoxin toxicity  instruct pt on foods that contain Vitamin D and encourage adequate intake  monitor parathyroid hormone
Просмотров: 3708 NRSNG
Atropine (Atro-pen) Nursing Pharmacology Considerations
 
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FREE Nursing School Cheat Sheets at: http://www.NRSNG.com Tired of professors who don't seem to care, confusing lectures, and taking endless NCLEX® review questions? . . . Welcome to NRSNG.com | Where Nurses Learn . . . Prepare to DEMOLISH the NCLEX. Follow Us::::::::::::::::::::::::: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nrsng/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nrsng Twitter: https://twitter.com/nrsngcom Snapchat: @nrsngcom Resources::::::::::::::::::::::: Blog: http://www.NRSNG.com FREE Cheat Sheets: http://www.nrsng.com/freebies Books: http://www.NursingStudentBooks.com Nursing Student Toolbox: http://www.NRSNG.com/toolbox MedMaster Course: http://www.MedMasterCourse.com Visit us at http://www.nrsng.com/medical-information-disclaimer/ for disclaimer information. NCLEX®, NCLEX-RN® are registered trademarks of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, INC. and hold no affiliation with NRSNG.
Просмотров: 1446 NRSNG
Antiarrhythmics (Lesson 1 - An Introduction)
 
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An introduction to antiarrhythmics, including a description of the Singh-Vaughan Williams classification system, and a review of the cardiac action potential. For more discussion about action potential, check out this excellent video from Bozeman Science (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYLyhXRp298)
Просмотров: 21771 Strong Medicine