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Hormones Connection to Your Nervous System
 
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__ Check Out the Extreme Health Academy: https://www.extremehealthacademy.com What is the Extreme Health Academy? With the world becoming increasingly toxic and the incredible lack of knowledge regarding appropriate healthcare, it has never been more important to take charge of your health and your life. The Extreme Health Academy is a website that's full of information to help you learn exactly what you must do to survive and thrive in this world. Best of all this website is a community of people ready to help others on the road to optimal health with features like an online forum, live webinars, podcasts, video courses, and more. __ If you'd like to participate in the monthly Challenges please visit: http://www.ExtremeHealthChallenge.com If you'd like to tune in live for our next webinar please go to: https://www.extremehealthacademy.com/... ___ Dr. Bergman's Website: https://drjohnbergman.com/ Dr. Bergman's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/drjohnbergman/ Dr. Bergman's Clinic: http://bergmanchiropractic.com 714-962-5891 Office Hours: Monday 5:15am 6:00pm Tuesday 6:30am 6:00pm Wednesday 5:15am 6:00pm Thursday 5:15am 6:00pm Friday 6:30am 6:00pm Saturday Closed Closed Sunday Closed Closed Dr. Bergman is available for Skype and Phone consultations which you can schedule by using the link below: https://drjohnbergman.com/online-consultations/booking-consultations/ For Media and Business Inquires contact: support@drjohnbergman.com
Просмотров: 35197 Dr. John Bergman
√ Homeostasis, hormones and the nervous system | Biology
 
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https://www.iitutor.com In this video you will be learning about: The Endocrine System, The Nervous System, Hormones, Receptors, and The hypothalamus and pituitary gland and their roles. How can the body parts communicate with each other to detect and counteract changes from the normal? By pathways in 2 interacting body systems. Endocrine System (Hormonal system). The endocrine system is made up of glands that secrete chemical hormones into blood and target tissues. Endocrine glands make hormones. These are chemicals that travel in the blood to cause an effect in other parts of the body – to maintain a balance. The Nervous System which is made up of the: central nervous system (CNS) or control centre (brain and spinal cord), peripheral nervous system (PNS) with branching nerves (neurons) covering the entire body. Our body knows how to respond in each environment due to receptors in our body. Receptors are cells that are on our skin and within our body to be able to detect change and send the message by our nerves to the brain. There are different receptors within our body and on the surface of our skin. Receptors depend on the body senses – sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch. Eyes – photoreceptors, light sensitive. Ears – mechanoreceptors, detects vibrations in sound. Tongue – chemoreceptors receptors (detect chemicals). Nose – chemoreceptors (detect chemicals). Skin – mechanoreceptors that are sensitive to touch and pressure. There are multiple receptors in the skin to detect external stimuli. For temperature there are thermoreceptors and for pain there are nociceptors. Most internal vital organs are protected by fluid and ultimately by the skin. Without the skin, our vital organs would be exposed to many harsh environments which they wouldn’t be able to cope. Our senses work together to maintain a stable internal environment despite external conditions. It is to protect our body’s vital organs and activities by keeping a constant internal environment. The nerves cells change their rate of impulses according to the temperature of the body. They communicate with a part of the brain called the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is the control centre of homeostasis and is linked to the endocrine (hormonal) system by the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland releases hormones when signaled by the hypothalamus. Plants and other organisms without nervous systems secrete hormones to make changes based on their external environment. Plants will respond to changes in temperature sunlight, water and nutrients available in the environment. These are much slower than a nervous system response. The hormone is moved from cell to cell along the plant until it reaches the target area, however animals use their blood as a transport of hormones and therefore an animal’s hormonal responses are much faster. Hormones are released in glands in the body in response to the activity of tissues and organs. Some hormones are released into target areas by ducts; examples include salivary glands, milk glands and digestive glands. Some hormones are released directly into the blood to be transported to target cells. There are around 50 different types of hormones in the human body. Some glands and hormones are mentioned below. ADH – water concentration regulation, Prolactin – controls milk production and secretion, Growth hormone – stimulates growth and cell reproduction, Thyroxine – controls the regulation of the body’s metabolic Functions. The role of hormones is the control of the internal environment to maintain homeostasis by regulating the amounts and types of body chemicals. Hormones are chemical messengers which are secreted by glands in order to bring about (usually) relatively gradual changes in the body. For example, insulin is released by the pancreas to encourage the liver to absorb glucose from the blood (and then convert it to glycogen). Hormones allow the body to cope with stress, physical and emotional. Blood sugar, water and waste levels are other internal stimuli. Blood glucose levels are maintained by the hormone of insulin released by the pancreas. When there is insufficient insulin, blood sugar levels remain high, this results in diabetes. Anti-diuretic hormone (WATER regulation) (ADH or vasopressin) controls water reabsorption in the nephron. When levels of fluid in the blood drop, the hypothalamus causes the pituitary to release ADH. Aldosterone (SALT regulation) is a steroid hormone secreted by the adrenal gland. Its function is to regulate the transfer of sodium and potassium ions in the kidney. Aldosterone (SALT regulation) and the Anti-diuretic hormone (water reabsorption regulation) are two hormones that are vital to the body and you should know these for your course.
Просмотров: 4914 iitutor.com
Endocrine System, part 1 - Glands & Hormones: Crash Course A&P #23
 
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Hank begins teaching you about your endocrine system by explaining how it uses glands to produce hormones. These hormones are either amino-acid based and water soluble, or steroidal and lipid-soluble, and may target many types of cells or just turn on specific ones. He will also touch on hormone cascades, and how the HPA axis effects your stress response. Table of Contents Endocrine System 2:32 Glands Produce Hormones 2:58 Amino Acid Based and Water Soluble 4:18 Steroidal and Lipid Soluble 4:44 Hormone Cascades 6:15 HPA Axis Effects Your Stress Response 6:30 *** Crash Course Psychology Poster: http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse *** Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Sandra Aft, Brad Wardell, Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: Laura Hewett FROM: Amy Paez Greetings from the other side of the world! DFTBA -- TO: Wesley FROM: G Distance is created by the Desert Otherworld, therefore we shall not be destroyed. ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Mickey Maloney, Dan Smalley, Stephen DeCubellis, Vanessa Benavent, Andrew Galante, LankySam!, David Costello, Vanessa Benavent, Kenzo Yasuda, Tessa White -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Просмотров: 2234404 CrashCourse
GCSE Biology Revision: The nervous system
 
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GCSE Biology Revision: The nervous system You can watch all my videos at www.freesciencelessons.co.uk In this video we start looking at the nervous system by exploring what is meant by a stimulus and by receptors. We then look in more detail at light receptor cells and see what is meant by the word "synapse".
Просмотров: 113702 Freesciencelessons
Coordination and Control (Part 1 of 3) - Nerves and Hormones
 
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This is a video lesson which looks at the role of nerves and hormones in multicellular organisms. For more Biology video lessons check out www.anytimeeducation.com
Просмотров: 9187 Jeremy LeCornu
The Nervous System - CrashCourse Biology #26
 
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Hank begins a series of videos on organ systems with a look at the nervous system and all of the things that it is responsible for in the body. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dft.ba/-8bCC Like CrashCourse on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow CrashCourse on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3a36 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Просмотров: 1950443 CrashCourse
Difference Between Nervous and Hormonal Co-ordination
 
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Useful for CBSE, ICSE, NCERT & International Students Grade : 10 Subject :Biology Lesson : Control and Coordination Topic: Difference Between Nervous and Harmonal Co-ordination Nerves and hormonal co coordination are important in co ordination are important in coordinating body activities by transmitting messages to produce responses although they have similarities they have numerous differences between them. Useful for CBSE, ICSE, NCERT & International Students Grade : 10 Subject :Biology Lesson : Control and Coordination Topic: Difference Between Nervous and Hormonal Co-ordination Nerves and hormonal co coordination are important in co ordination are important in coordinating body activities by transmitting messages to produce responses although they have similarities they have numerous differences between them. Visit www.oztern.com to find personalized test preparation solutions for Pre Medical - AIPMT, AIIMS, JIPMER, State, Pre Engineering - IIT JEE, JEE MAIN, BITSAT, State and Foundations - Class 6 to 10.
Просмотров: 3109 CBSE
Understanding Your Nervous System - Adrenal and Thyroid Stress
 
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Understanding Your Nervous System - Adrenal and Thyroid Stress Schedule a FREE Consult: http://www.justinhealth.com/free-consultation In this video, Dr. Justin Marchegiani talks about the understanding of our nervous system which is the control center of the body. Healthy nervous system function influences digestion, energy, movement, and performance. Many people's nervous systems are working on overdrive, as a result, causing hypothyroidism, adrenal fatigue, and leaky gut. Our digestive system has a nervous system unto its own called the enteric nervous system. Most people don't realize that our digestive tract has just as many neurons as our brain and spinal chord. Watch this video to learn more about your nervous system. ===================================== Gluten Video Series: http://www.justinhealth.com/gluten-video-series Thyroid Hormone Balance Video Series: http://www.justinhealth.com/thyroid-hormone-balance Female Hormone Balance Video Series: http://www.justinhealth.com/female-hormone-balance ===================================== ***Click below to SUBSCRIBE for more Videos http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=justinhealth ===================================== Dr. Justin Marchegiani Email: office@justinhealth.com Newsletter: http://www.justinhealth.com/newsletter Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/115880353981241082117/115880353981241082117/ Visit us at: http://www.JustInHealth.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/justinhealthwellnessclinic Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/just_in_health Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/dr-justin-marchegiani/56/804/50a/ -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "GI Issues — Malabsorption, Infection & Inflammation in the Eye and Joint | Dr. J Live Q & A" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGf7F1Xi6po -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Просмотров: 3935 Just In Health
Control of the GI tract | Gastrointestinal system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Created by Raja Narayan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/gastrointestinal-diseases/gastroenteritis-rn/v/what-is-gastroenteritis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-gastrointestinal-system/rn-the-gastrointestinal-system/v/colon-rectum-anus?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Просмотров: 291148 khanacademymedicine
Cell Communication: Hormones and Neurotransmitters
 
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We already learned a little bit about receptors and the signaling pathways that they initiate, but what are the molecules the travel throughout your body, carrying messages like little carrier pigeons? They are called hormones and neurotransmitters, and you can't even begin the imagine the variety of cellular processes they regulate. Let's take a look! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe ProfessorDaveExplains@gmail.com http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Просмотров: 7818 Professor Dave Explains
Endocrine system -  Control and Coordination  CBSE Class X Science ( Biology) Lesson
 
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Endocrine system - Control and Coordination CBSE Biology Class 10 Science lesson by by Soma Mukhopadhyay. CBSE Biology Class 10 Science lesson Endocrine System SuccessCDs Education ( https://www.youtube.com/successcds1 ) is an online education channel focused on providing education through Videos as per CBSE, ICSE and NCERT syllabi upto Class 12 (K-12) for English, Maths, Hindi, Science,Social Science, Sanskrit and other subjects. Also visit our Channel for Entrance Exams in India FAQs & Application Process, GK & Current Affairs, Communication Skills Our website ( https://www.successcds.net ) is one of the leading portal on Entrance Exams and Admissions in India. Follow us: https://www.facebook.com/SuccessCD https://google.com/+successcds https://twitter.com/entranceexam https://twitter.com/successcds https://www.youtube.com/successcds1 https://www.youtube.com/englishacademy1 About this Video: ENDOCRINE SYSTEM IT IS ALSO CALLED THE HORMONAL SYSYTEM. IT OFTEN OPERATES IN CO ORDINATION WITH NERVOUS SYSTEM. CHARACTERISTICS OF HORMONES : The hormones are secreted in small amounts by the endocrine glands. The hormones are poured directly into the blood and carried throughout the body by blood circulatory system The hormones have their effect at the sites different from the sites where they are made. So, they are also called chemical messengers.. The hormones act on target organs. The hormones coordinate the activities and the growth of the body. The excess or deficiency of hormones has a harmful effect on our body. DIFFERENT ENDOCRINE GLANDS PRESENT IN THE BODY HYPOTHALAMUS GLAND AND PITUITARY GLAND The pituitary gland is a pea-sized gland located in the center of the skull. The pituitary gland acts as a master controlling gland, releasing a number of hormones that activate other glands. Hypothalamus gland is present in the brain. Hypothalamus produces 'releasing hormones' and 'inhibitory hormones'. Hypothalamus controls the pituitary gland. PINEAL GLAND OR THE VESTIGIAL ORGAN The pineal gland which is present in the brain has no such function. Pineal gland is supposed to be a vestigial organ. ( Vestigial organs are those organs which no longer function.) The thyroid gland, located in the neck, secretes the hormone thyroxine. Thyroxine increases body metabolism, in which food is broken down and converted into heat and energy. The parathyroid glands are four small glands located in the neck behind the thyroid gland. These glands secrete a hormone that regulates the body's use of calcium and phosphorus to maintain healthy bones. Parathyroid hormone also affects muscle contraction and the conduction of nerve impulses. Thymus gland lies in the lower part of the neck and upper part of chest. Thymus gland secretes thymus hormone which plays a role in the development of the immune system of the body. The pancreas is a long, narrow gland located in the abdomen behind the stomach and beneath the liver. The pancreas secretes insulin, a hormone that regulates the body's use of sugar The adrenals are two small glands, each located on the top of one kidney. The adrenal glands releases the hormone epinephrine, which speeds up heart rate and increases blood pressure to help the body cope with emergencies. And also releases hormones that control the level of salts and water in the blood and help regulate the use of sugar. It also secretes small amounts of male sex hormones, or androgens, in both males and females. Males have sex glands called testes that secrete androgens, male sex hormones. In addition to contributing to male sexual characteristics, androgens contribute to the production of sperm and the development of the prostate gland. Females have sex glands called ovaries that release hormones called estrogens. These hormones contribute to the development of female sexual characteristics, including skin, hair, and breast development. Estrogens work with certain pituitary hormones to control the menstrual cycle. Also See Other Science Lessons Central Nervous System - (Control and Coordination) CBSE Biology Class 10 Science https://youtu.be/oHgg4S9xIiA Control and Coordination in plants CBSE Class X Science Lesson https://youtu.be/85GnMnN91PM background Music danosongs.com Also See Playlist - CBSE Class X Science Lessons https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9vL8QnJ37pIcbCcbjmPekDkj5SjWfqOa
Просмотров: 52369 SuccessCDs Education
Hormonal and nervous control of heart rate - A2 Science
 
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How heart rate is maintained or changed. Part of OCR A2 214. Quickest and concisest explanation.
Просмотров: 17479 YEAHScience!
How to remember hormone and their functions with easy trick
 
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How to remember hormone and their functions with easy trick - This lecture explains tricks and tips to remember the name and function of hormones secreted from different glands in human body. This video states the name of hormones secreted from thyroid gland, adrenal gland, parathyroid gland, pancreas and the function of all the secreted hormones are also mentioned in this video. This video will guide you to remember hormone names and their functions in details with the help of this simple trick video. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching the video lecture mnemonics on hormones name and functions with easy tricks.
Просмотров: 60771 Shomu's Biology
[Part 4] Hormonal control vs nervous control
 
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Просмотров: 366 Joon Kiat Lee
Fight or Flight Response
 
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Paul Andersen explains how epinephrine is responsible for changes in chemistry of our body associated with the fight or flight response. Epinephrine released by the adrenal medulla are received by a number of organs associated with the sympathetic nervous system.
Просмотров: 502298 Bozeman Science
The Nervous System In 9 Minutes
 
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The Nervous System In 9 Minutes See more Anatomy videos @ http://www.cteskills.com The basic purpose of the Nervous System is to coordinate all of the activities of the body. It enables the Body to respond and adapt to changes that occur both inside and outside the body. The two major parts to the Nervous System are the Central Nervous System and the Peripheral Nervous System. The Central Nervous System is also divided into two major structures. The Brain and the Spinal Cord. The Brain is found within the skull, or cranium and it is made up of 6 main sections. These six are the Cerebrum, Cerebellum, Diencephalon, the Midbrain, Pons, and the Medulla Oblongata. The other half of the Central Nervous System is the Spinal Cord. The spinal cord is the link between the brain and the nerves in the rest of your body. The spinal cord is divided into four different regions: the cervical, thoracic, lumbar and, afferent and efferent spinal nerves, which merge to form peripheral nerves. Now that we know the Brain and Spinal Cord primarily make up the Central Nervous System, let’s look at the Peripheral Nervous System. The Peripheral Nervous System is essentially, the Nervous System outside of the brain and spinal cord. The Peripheral Nervous System is subdivided into two smaller systems called the Somatic Nervous System, and the Autonomic Nervous System.
Просмотров: 1149370 CTE Skills.com
Nerves and hormones
 
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A discussion of coordinated responses in the body via nerves and hormones.
Просмотров: 165 plowton
Nerves and hormones: GCSE Biology
 
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GCSE Biology module (sample): Nerves and hormones By the end of this topic you will have covered: - Hormones in our body - Tropisms: hormone control and plant growth - Uses of plant hormones - The nervous system - The reflex arc - The synapse - The brain and mind - Hormone control of the menstrual cycle - Controlling fertility Get the grades you need in GCSE Biology; access HD-quality GCSE revision videos and apps from LearnersCloud: http://www.learnerscloud.com/student/products/gcse-revision-videos-apps/gcse-biology To find out more and to start a free trial visit: http://www.learnerscloud.com/student/home/gcse/gcse-revision
Просмотров: 12661 LearnersCloud
Conscious Nutrition Episode #28: Hormones and Your Nervous System
 
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Download your FREE introductory guide on How to Use Food to Restore Thyroid Health - http://eastwesthealing.com/restoration-thyroid-audio-series ____________________________________________________________________ FREE 15min Consultation: http://eastwesthealing.com/get-start-with-a-private-consultation ____________________________________________________________________ We will be on FB Live EVERY Thursday at 12pm PST. If you have any questions or ideas, please head on over to our FB and post your comments. Sharing is caring, please don't forget that :) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eastwesthealingperformance In this video we will be discussing: -The relationship between your nervous system and your hormones -How and where your body produces hormones -What you need to know about hormone testing -How hormone replacement therapy may or may not be the solution for you -The first steps to take to achieve hormonal balance
Просмотров: 107 EastWest Healing
The Nervous System, Part 3 - Synapses!: Crash Course A&P #10
 
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•••SUBBABLE MESSAGE••• TO: NerdFighteria FROM: Dave at DTXC.CO Cycling t-shirts at DTXC.CO. Don't give up the Road! DFTBA! *** Subbable Co-Sponsors: Logan Sanders https://www.facebook.com/perrylogans Dr. Boyev http://youtube.com/taichiknees *** You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. *** We continue our tour of the nervous system with a look at synapses and the crazy stuff cocaine does to your body. -- Table of Contents: Electrical Synapses Use Ion Currents Over Gap Junctions to Transmit Neurological Signals 2:56 Chemical Synapses Turn Electrical Signals Into Chemical Ones 4:01 Chemical Synapses Use Neurotransmitters 5:14 Effects of Cocaine In the Electrochemical System 7:44 -- CRASH COURSE KIDS! http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Просмотров: 2023469 CrashCourse
How Hormones Work in the Body Animation - Endocrine System Anatomy & Physiology Video - Hypothalamus
 
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The endocrine system is primarily composed of glands that produce chemical messengers called hormones. Glands of the endocrine system include the pituitary gland, the thyroid gland, the parathyroid glands, the thymus, and the adrenal glands. Other glands are also included within the endocrine system since they contain endocrine tissue that secretes hormones. These include the pancreas, ovaries and testes. The endocrine and nervous systems work very closely together. The brain continuously sends instructions to the endocrine system, and in return receives feedback from the endocrine glands. Because of this intimate relationship, the nervous and endocrine systems are referred to as the neuroendocrine system. The hypothalamus is known as the master switchboard because it’s the part of the brain that controls the endocrine system. The pituitary gland, which hangs by a thin stalk from the hypothalamus, is called the master gland of the body because it regulates the activity of the endocrine glands. The hypothalamus detects the rising level of the target organ's hormones then sends either hormonal or electrical messages to the pituitary gland. In response, the pituitary gland releases hormones, which travel through the bloodstream to a target endocrine gland, instructing it to stop producing its hormones. Here's how the endocrine system keeps itself in check: eventually, the hypothalamus detects the rising level of the target organ's hormones, and sends a message to the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland then stops releasing certain hormones, causing the target organ to stop producing its hormones. The endocrine system constantly adjusts hormone levels so that the body can function normally. This process is called homeostasis. The endocrine system is the collection of glands of an organism that secrete hormones directly into the circulatory system to be carried towards distant target organs. In humans, the major endocrine glands include the pineal gland, pituitary gland, pancreas, ovaries, testes, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, and adrenal glands. In vertebrates, the hypothalamus is the neural control center for all endocrine systems. The field of study dealing with the endocrine system and its disorders is endocrinology, a branch of internal medicine. Special features of endocrine glands are, in general, their ductless nature, their vascularity, and commonly the presence of intracellular vacuoles or granules that store their hormones. In contrast, exocrine glands, such as salivary glands, sweat glands, and glands within the gastrointestinal tract, tend to be much less vascular and have ducts or a hollow lumen. A number of glands that signal each other in sequence are usually referred to as an axis, for example, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In addition to the specialized endocrine organs mentioned above, many other organs that are part of other body systems, such as bone, kidney, liver, heart and gonads, have secondary endocrine functions. For example, the kidney secretes endocrine hormones such as erythropoietin and renin. Hormones can consist of either amino acid complexes, steroids, eicosanoids, leukotrienes, or prostaglandins. The endocrine system is in contrast to the exocrine system, which secretes its hormones to the outside of the body using ducts. As opposed to endocrine factors that travel considerably longer distances via the circulatory system, other signaling molecules, such as paracrine factors involved in paracrine signalling diffuse over a relatively short distance. The human endocrine system consists of several systems that operate via feedback loops. Several important feedback systems are mediated via the hypothalamus and pituitary. TRH – TSH – T3/T4 GnRH – LH/FSH – sex hormones CRH – ACTH – cortisol Renin – angiotensin – aldosterone leptin vs. insulin Endocrine glands are glands of the endocrine system that secrete their products, hormones, directly into instastial spaces and then absorbed into blood rather than through a duct. The major glands of the endocrine system include the pineal gland, pituitary gland, pancreas, ovaries, testes, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, hypothalamus and adrenal glands. The hypothalamus and pituitary gland are neuroendocrine organs. The Hypothalamus Essentials The portion of the brain that maintains the body’s internal balance (homeostasis). The hypothalamus is the link between the endocrine and nervous systems. The hypothalamus produces releasing and inhibiting hormones, which stop and start the production of other hormones throughout the body. Pituitary Gland Essentials: The hormones of the pituitary gland help regulate the functions of other endocrine glands. The pituitary gland has two parts—the anterior lobe and posterior lobe—that have two very separate functions.
Просмотров: 12246 AniMed
The hypothalamus and pituitary gland | Endocrine system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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What makes the endocrine organs tick? Find out in this video about the hypothalamus and pituitary glands! Created by Ryan Scott Patton. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-endocrine-system/rn-the-endocrine-system/v/hormone-concentration-metabolism-negative-feedback?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-endocrine-system/rn-the-endocrine-system/v/endocrine-gland-hormone-review?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
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The Endocrine System and Hormones | Merck Manual Consumer Version
 
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Learn more about the endocrine system: http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/hormonal-and-metabolic-disorders/biology-of-the-endocrine-system/endocrine-glands The endocrine system involves hormones, chemical messengers that affect various body functions. The hypothalamus, part of the brain, controls the pituitary gland, which itself releases hormones that control other organs in the endocrine system, such as the thyroid and adrenal glands. Growth hormone controls functions such as the body’s growth. Thyroid hormone controls the rate of the body’s metabolism (for example, its heart rate and how rapidly chemical reactions are processed. The pancreas produces insulin, which helps blood sugar enter cells; when there is too little insulin, diabetes develops. The adrenal glands, one on each kidney, make adrenaline (epinephrine), aldosterone, and cortisol, which help the body adapt to stress and maintain heart rate and blood pressure. The testes make testosterone, the male sex hormone, and sperm. The ovaries make estrogen, the female sex hormone, and contain eggs. About The Merck Manuals: First published in 1899 as a small reference book for physicians and pharmacists, The Merck Manual grew in size and scope to become one of the world's most widely used comprehensive medical resources for professionals and consumers. As The Manual evolved, it continually expanded the reach and depth of its offerings to reflect the mission of providing the best medical information to a wide cross-section of users, including medical professionals and students, veterinarians and veterinary students, and consumers. • Merck Manual Consumer Version: http://www.MerckManuals.com/Home • Facebook for Consumers: http://www.Facebook.com/MerckManualHome • Twitter for Consumers: http://www.Twitter.com/MerckManualHome
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B1 Nervous vs  Hormonal Communication (EDEXCEL/AQA)
 
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0:52 Endocrine Glands Release Hormones 1:58 How Hormones Travel 3:11 Comparing Hormonal and Nervous Communication 5:09 Synapses – The Gap Between Neurones
Просмотров: 11408 StudySmart: Science
Pregnenolone: A Nervous System Protector and Memory Enhancing Hormone - Gianulca Pazzaglia, MD
 
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This is a preview of Pregnenolone: A Nervous System Protector and Memory Enhancing Hormone for Humans Too by Gianulca Pazzaglia, MD at the 2007 Anti-Aging Conference in London. Visit www.instatapes.com to purchase this lecture and many others on DiGiVision, video and slides synced. Item #ACL-071W36
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Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland Functions, Animation
 
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This is an update of a previously uploaded video. Endocrine functions of the hypothalamus and hypophysis. This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/endocrinology Voice by: Ashley Fleming ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia/posts All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. The hypothalamus and pituitary gland are at the center of endocrine functions. The hypothalamus is part of the brain, while the pituitary, also called hypophysis, is an endocrine gland. The hypothalamus links the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland. The two structures are located at the base of the brain and are connected by a thin stalk. The hypothalamus produces several hormones, known as neurohormones, which control the secretion of other hormones by the pituitary. Pituitary hormones, in turn, control the production of yet other hormones by other endocrine glands. The pituitary has two distinct lobes: The anterior pituitary, also called adenohypophysis, communicates with the hypothalamus via a network of blood vessels known as the hypophyseal portal system. Several neurohormones produced by the hypothalamus are secreted into the portal system to reach the anterior pituitary, where they stimulate or inhibit production of pituitary hormones. Major hormones include: - Gonadotropin-releasing hormone, GnRH, a hypothalamic hormone, stimulates the anterior pituitary to produce follicle-stimulating hormone, FSH, and luteinizing hormone, LH. FSH and LH, in turn, control the activities of the gonads – the ovaries and testes. - Corticotropin-releasing hormone, CRH, promotes the secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone, ACTH, which in turn stimulates production of cortisol by the adrenal gland. - Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, promotes the release of thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH, and prolactin. TSH, in turn, induces the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones. Prolactin stimulates the mammary glands to produce milk. - Prolactin-inhibiting hormone, PIH, inhibits production of prolactin. - Growth hormone–releasing hormone, GHRH, promotes production of growth hormone, or somatotropin, which has widespread effects on the growth of various tissues in the body. - Growth hormone–inhibiting hormone, GHIH, or somatostatin, inhibits production of growth hormone. The posterior pituitary, also called neurohypophysis, communicates with the hypothalamus via a bundle of nerve fibers. These are essentially hypothalamic neurons with cell bodies located in the hypothalamus while their axons extend to posterior pituitary. These neurons produce hormones, transport them down the stalk, and store them at the nerve terminals within the posterior pituitary, where they await a nerve signal to trigger their release. Two hormones have been identified so far: - Vasopressin, also known as antidiuretic hormone, ADH, acts on the kidneys to retain water. - and oxytocin, which causes the uterus to contract during childbirth, and stimulates contractions of milk ducts in lactating women.
Просмотров: 1519 Alila Medical Media
Anatomy and Physiology of Endocrine System
 
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Anatomy and Physiology of Endocrine System thyroid diseases what is endocrine system pituitary hormones function of endocrine system endocrine diseases endocrine system organs define endocrine system function of the endocrine system what is the function of the endocrine system endocrine system diagram endocrine system quiz circulatory diseases circulatory system functions list of hormones human hormones functions of the endocrine system diseases of the endocrine system hormonal disorders hormone deficiency endocrine system functions human endocrine system circulatory system disorders endocrine system quizlet glands of the body functions of endocrine system organs of the endocrine system endocrine system facts endocrine system disorders pituitary growth hormone definition of endocrine system endocrine system pdf organs in the endocrine system endocrine system glands glands of the endocrine system parts of the endocrine system endocrine system for kids hgh growth hormone hormones in human body endocrine system hormones disorders of the endocrine system ndocrine system parts hormone growth hormone disorders endocrine system worksheet endocrine systems the endocrine system consists of endocrine system concept map facts about the endocrine system nervous and endocrine system endocrine glands and their functions what are the functions of the endocrine system diseases of endocrine system fun facts about the endocrine system chapter 45 hormones and the endocrine system nervous system and endocrine system major organs of the endocrine system what is the main function of the endocrine system endocrine system test endocrine glands secrete circulatory system in human endocrin system chapter 9 the endocrine system #Anatomy#Physiology#Endocrine
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Sympathetic Nervous System: Crash Course A&P #14
 
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Hank tries not to stress you out too much as he delves into the functions and terminology of your sympathetic nervous system. -- Table of Contents Sympathetic Nervous System Controls the Body's Stress Response 0:26 How Signals Travel to Effectors 1:48 Acetylcholine in the Ganglion 3:55 Norepinephrine at the Effector 4:42 Norepinephrine and Epinephrine Are Secreted as Hormones 5:35 Alpha Receptors Cause Smooth Muscles to Constrict 7:14 Beta Receptors Cause Smooth Muscles to Relax 7:27 *** Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly (and, until April 30th, have your contributions matched by Patreon!) by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Simun Niclasen, Brad Wardell, Roger C. Rocha, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Nevin Spoljaric, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Jessica Simmons, Stefan R. Finnerup, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Mike Drew, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian Ludvigsen, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: Ariela FROM: Gavi I love you so much, stay awesome as always! -- TO: Josiah P. FROM: Amy P. I love you! ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Pankaj Gurung Kelley Culp Joshua McKee Amory Olson: Kasson-Mantorville High School Science Instructor Jack Thakar Arrow Worthy Magnus "Krox" Krokstad Rachel Lee Brian J. Rolf Sylien -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
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The Chemical Mind - Crash Course Psychology #3
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. BAHHHHHH! Did I scare you? What exactly happens when we get scared? How does our brain make our body react? Just what are Neurotransmitters? In this episode of Crash Course Psychology, Hank takes us to the simplest part of the complex system of our brains and nervous systems; The Neuron. -- -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Просмотров: 2770191 CrashCourse
Stress Response: Outline of the nervous and hormonal system
 
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A short summary of the two system that control stress: the nervous system (particularly the sysmpathetic nervous system) and the hormonal system (particularly the pituitary and adrenal glands). From Bodyology Massage School
Просмотров: 370 Bodyology Massage School
Great Glands - Your Endocrine System: CrashCourse Biology #33
 
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Hank fills us in on the endocrine system - the system of glands which produce and secrete different types of hormones directly into the bloodstream to regulate the body's growth, metabolism, and sexual development & function. Like CrashCourse on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow CrashCourse on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-1lsU Table of Contents 1) Signalling Systems 2:07:0 2) Pituitary 3:19:1 3) Hypothalamus 4:17:1 4) Thyroid 4:52:1 5) Adrenal 5:38:1 6) Pancreas 6:51:1 7) Biolography 8:49:2 biology, crash course, crashcourse, hank green, anatomy, physiology, endocrine system, hormone, gland, human, body, science, exocrine, pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, pancreas, gonads, paracrine signalling, autocrine signalling, signal receptor, steroids, peptides, monoamines, brain, hypothalamus, oxytocin, negative feedback loop, kidney, stress, ACTH, epinephrine, organ, glucose, insulin, glucagon, testes, androgen, testosterone, ovaries, estrogen, progestin, estradiol, progesterone, sex, alfred jost, embryologist, secretion, embryonic development, embryo, mammal, fetal development, puberty, reproductive organs Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Просмотров: 1375318 CrashCourse
Endocrine and nervous system
 
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Endocrine and nervous system Visit our website: http://www.sliderbase.com/ Free PowerPoint Presentations for teaching and learning Communication Chemical Main Function: It releases hormones into the blood to signal other cells to behave in certain ways. It is a slow but widespread form of communication. Endocrine glands Release hormones into the bloodstream. Hormones are chemicals released in one part of the body that travel through the bloodstream and affect the activities of cells in other parts of the body. Consists of: The Endocrine System Pituitary Gland Function: It secretes nine hormones that directly regulate many body functions and controls functions of other glands. Disorders: To much growth hormones (GH) in early childhood can result in a condition called gigantism. To little GH can result in Pituitary Dwarfism. Robert Wadlow Thyroid Gland Function: plays a major role in regulation the body’s metabolism. Disorders: If the Thyroid Gland produces to much Thyroxin, it can cause a condition known as Hyperthyroidism. If to little thyroxin produces it is called Hypothyroidism. Pancreas Function: The Insulin and Glycogen in the Pancreas help to keep the level of glucose in the blood stable. Disorders: When the Pancreas fails to produce or properly use Insulin, it can cause a condition known as Diabetes Mellitus. The hypothalamus is located in the brain and controls the release of hormones from the pituitary gland. It is an important link between the endocrine and nervous systems. The Nervous System Our nervous system allows us to feel pain. Cell body: contains nucleus & most of the cytoplasm Dendrites: projections that bring impulses into the neuron to the cell body. Axon: long projection that carries impulses away from cell body Nerves work together with muscles for movement. An impulse begins when one neuron is stimulated by another neuron or by the sense organs. The impulse travels down the axons of Sensory neurons to the brain cells called Interneurons. The brain will then send an impulse through motor neurons to the necessary muscle or organs, telling it to contract. Communication with Neurons
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How To Influence Your Stress Hormones, Nervous System & Brain Chemistry With Your Sense Of Smell
 
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Get an AromaHarmony unit here: http://amzn.to/112MzUz Get therapeutic grade essential oils: http://mydoterra.com/healthywildandfree Learn more at: http://healthywildandfree.com/calm-nervous-system-decrease-stress-hormones-alter-brain-chemistry-engaging-one-sense/ Follow on facebook: http://facebook.com/healthywildandfree Your sense if smell is the more powerful sense you have, being 10,000 times more sensitive than any other sense. Our sense of smell helps us detect danger (smoke from a fire) or smell something like lavender to calm our central nervous system. Whatever the case may be, our body interprets these airborn vapor molecules in the mucous membrane at the top of our nostril pathway and this is connected directly to the limbic system, which is part of the brain. It has receptor sites that influence brain chemistry instantly, so to understand it simply, your sense of smell instantly can and will impact your brain chemistry and is the quickest way to do so. Your emotional state, happiness, sadness, mental clarity or mental fog, can all be influenced by what you smell. The central nervous system and stress hormones within your body will respond to your sense of smell and brain chemistry as well. It's great though because you can biohack your sense of smell by using a simple tool such as this to destress, calm your nervous system, and sedate brain chemistry into a state of relaxation. So, your sense of smell will lead to more stress in your life, especially if you live in the city or breathe in chemicals, toxins, factory work etc... So when you get home using aromatherapy through a diffuser is a great practice to destress and get the body into a parasympathetic nervous system state so that it can relax, heal and detoxify. I will be creating more videos on aromatherapy and destressing practices so stay tuned. Healthy Wild And Free is a blog, podcast and community focused on living healthier, greener lives. The growth of the mind, body and spirit are some of the most enriching and rewarding experiences in life! Join the facebook community: http://Facebook.com/HealthyWildAndFree http://HealthyWildAndFree.com Thanks for watching, - David Benjamin
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The Endocrine System
 
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Paul Andersen explains the major elements in the endocrine system. He explains how glands produce hormones which target cells. He differentiates between water soluble and lipid soluble hormones. He then describes the hormones and actions of ten glands; pineal, anterior pituitary, posterior pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, adrenal cortex, adrenal medulla, testes and ovaries. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Просмотров: 1408081 Bozeman Science
Types of neurotransmitters | Nervous system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Created by Matthew Barry Jensen. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nervous-system-phy/rn-neuronal-synapses/v/types-of-neurotransmitter-receptors?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nervous-system-phy/rn-neuronal-synapses/v/neurotransmitter-release?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Просмотров: 305713 khanacademymedicine
Biology Nervous System & Hormones GCSE Biology & A-Level Biology: REVISIONAPP.CO.UK
 
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Biology Nervous System & Hormones GCSE Biology & A-Level Biology - Get Unlimited Access to GCSE Tutor Videos & Online Revision Here for £19.99: http://www.revisionapp.co.uk/product/online-gcse-revision/ We've just looked over Medical and Recreational Drugs. Now let's move on to the Nervous System and Hormones. Our body has two main systems controlling it; the nervous system and the hormone system. The nervous system works in three parts. We have our central nervous system that consists of our brain, our spinal cord and we have our peripheral nervous system that is made up of the nerves in the rest of the body. The hormonal system is made up of glands and the chemicals that are secreted by those glands. It's basically a chemical relay around our body. A gland detects a change and as a reaction to that change, it creates a hormone or chemical that affects the blood stream in the course of other reactions that happen afterwards. The nervous system works on receptors and stimuli. If I put my hand into something hot, the temperature receptors on my fingers will relay a message back to the neurons in my brain, saying that there's a temperature change and I need to move my hand. This response is automatic so I don't have to think about this happening. If I put my hand into something hot, I will feel pain and immediately jerk out. This is called a reflex. We also use the nervous system for our senses. We have receptors on our tongue for taste, in our nose for smell, ears for sound, and other things like that. The hormonal system is also controlled by our nervous system. A part of our brain is called the Hypothalamus, this is basically our control sensor. It regulates all the levels of our body, including chemicals percentages, temperatures, concentration, blood pressure, etc. If anything goes out of balance, this part of the brain sends out messages through different glands and chemicals for our body to make changes. For example, if I don't drink enough water in a day, my body needs to store the water in my blood, so I won't go the toilet because a chemical has been released to my kidney to store up any extra water. Hormones are also important in the development of the human body. For example, during puberty, a female and a male will release different hormones to induce changes, namely oestrogen for women and testosterone for men. One of the hormonal responses that doesn't really fit in, is the "fight or flight" response. This happens when you are put into a situation where you either need to 'fight', putting all of the energy of your body in that fight, or 'flight' i.e. to get away from the situation. It is a survival of the fittest trait. What happens when your body detects a stimulus that could put you in this position, is that adrenaline is released from the adrenal glands. This hormone increases the blood flow in our body that make us energetic so we can face the situation with all our energy. That was the Nervous System and Hormones. Make sure you go back to the beginning of Biology video and listen to them all again. Biology Nervous System & Hormones GCSE Biology & A-Level Biology - http://www.revisionapp.co.uk
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Biology - Nervous System: Science Exam Tips
 
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Get Unlimited Access to GCSE Tutor Videos & Online Revision Here for £19.99: http://www.revisionapp.co.uk/product/online-gcse-revision. Our body has two main systems controlling it; the nervous system and the hormone system. The nervous system works in three parts. We have our central nervous system that consists of our brain, our spinal cord and we have our peripheral nervous system that is made up of the nerves in the rest of the body. The hormonal system is made up of glands and the chemicals that are secreted by those glands. It's basically a chemical relay around our body. A gland detects a change and as a reaction to that change, it creates a hormone or chemical that affects the blood stream in the course of other reactions that happen afterwards. The nervous system works on receptors and stimuli. If I put my hand into something hot, the temperature receptors on my fingers will relay a message back to the neurons in my brain, saying that there's a temperature change and I need to move my hand. This response is automatic so I don't have to think about this happening. If I put my hand into something hot, I will feel pain and immediately jerk out. This is called a reflex. We also use the nervous system for our senses. We have receptors on our tongue for taste, in our nose for smell, ears for sound, and other things like that. The hormonal system is also controlled by our nervous system. A part of our brain is called the Hypothalamus, this is basically our control sensor. It regulates all the levels of our body, including chemicals percentages, temperatures, concentration, blood pressure, etc. If anything goes out of balance, this part of the brain sends out messages through different glands and chemicals for our body to make changes. For example, if I don't drink enough water in a day, my body needs to store the water in my blood, so I won't go the toilet because a chemical has been released to my kidney to store up any extra water. Hormones are also important in the development of the human body. For example, during puberty, a female and a male will release different hormones to induce changes, namely oestrogen for women and testosterone for men. One of the hormonal responses that doesn't really fit in, is the "fight or flight" response. This happens when you are put into a situation where you either need to 'fight', putting all of the energy of your body in that fight, or 'flight' i.e. to get away from the situation. It is a survival of the fittest trait. What happens when your body detects a stimulus that could put you in this position, is that adrenaline is released from the adrenal glands. This hormone increases the blood flow in our body that make us energetic so we can face the situation with all our energy. That was the Nervous System and Hormones. Make sure you go back to the beginning of Biology video and listen to them all again.
Просмотров: 3789 Revision App - Student Blog
Nervous System, Sensory System, and Hormone.
 
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First Term - Science - Grade 6 - Unit 4 - Lesson 1
Просмотров: 181 Al-Adwaa
The Nervous System, Part 1: Crash Course A&P #8
 
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•••SUBBABLE MESSAGE••• TO: Kerry FROM: Cale I love you with all my ha-art. Deadset. *** You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. *** Today Hank kicks off our look around MISSION CONTROL: your nervous system. -- Table of Contents: Sensory Input, Integration and Motor Output 1:36 Organization of Central and Peripheral Systems 2:16 Glial Cells 3:54 Role, Anatomy and Function of Neuron Types 5:23 Structure and Function of Neurons 6:20 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Просмотров: 3525511 CrashCourse
Endocrine System Made simple- Human Endocrinology Overview
 
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Endocrinology Made simple- Human Endocrine System Overview Watch part 2 : https://youtu.be/K1y36Atqi-Y Human endocrine system, group of ductless glands that regulate body processes by secreting chemical substances called hormones. Hormones act on nearby tissues or are carried in the bloodstream to act on specific target organs and distant tissues. Diseases of the endocrine system can result from the oversecretion or undersecretion of hormones or from the inability of target organs or tissues to respond to hormones effectively. Modern endocrinology largely originated in the 20th century, however. Its scientific origin is rooted in the studies of French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813–78), who made the key observation that complex organisms such as humans go to great lengths to preserve the constancy of what he called the “milieu intérieur” (internal environment). Later, American physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon (1871–1945) used the term homeostasis to describe this inner constancy. The endocrine system, in association with the nervous system and the immune system, regulates the body’s internal activities and the body’s interactions with the external environment to preserve the internal environment. This control system permits the prime functions of living organisms—growth, development, and reproduction—to proceed in an orderly, stable fashion; it is exquisitely self-regulating, so that any disruption of the normal internal environment by internal or external events is resisted by powerful countermeasures. When this resistance is overcome, illness ensues. The nature of endocrine regulation Endocrine gland secretion is not a haphazard process; it is subject to precise, intricate control so that its effects may be integrated with those of the nervous system and the immune system. The simplest level of control over endocrine gland secretion resides at the endocrine gland itself. The signal for an endocrine gland to secrete more or less of its hormone is related to the concentration of some substance, either a hormone that influences the function of the gland (a tropic hormone), a biochemical product (e.g., glucose), or a biologically important element (e.g., calcium or potassium). Because each endocrine gland has a rich supply of blood, each gland is able to detect small changes in the concentrations of its regulating substances. Some endocrine glands are controlled by a simple negative feedback mechanism. For example, negative feedback signaling mechanisms in the parathyroid glands (located in the neck) rely on the binding activity of calcium-sensitive receptors that are located on the surface of parathyroid cells. Decreased serum calcium concentrations result in decreased calcium receptor binding activity that stimulates the secretion of parathormone from the parathyroid glands. The increased serum concentration of parathormone stimulates bone resorption (breakdown) to release calcium into the blood and reabsorption of calcium in the kidney to retain calcium in the blood, thereby restoring serum calcium concentrations to normal levels. In contrast, increased serum calcium concentrations result in increased calcium receptor-binding activity and inhibition of parathormone secretion by the parathyroid glands. This allows serum calcium concentrations to decrease to normal levels. Therefore, in people with normal parathyroid glands, serum calcium concentrations are maintained within a very narrow range even in the presence of large changes in calcium intake or excessive losses of calcium from the body. Watch Again : https://youtu.be/NOV0OuYxB7g
Просмотров: 59717 MEDSimplified
Endocrine gland hormone review | Endocrine system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Welcome to the Endocrine System. Get ready to learn about one of the most important ways that our body parts communicate! By Ryan Patton. . Created by Ryan Scott Patton. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-endocrine-system/rn-the-endocrine-system/v/hypothalamus-and-pituitary-gland?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/hematologic-system-diseases/rn-myeloproliferative-disorders/v/what-is-primary-myelofibrosis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Просмотров: 906626 khanacademymedicine
Digestive hormones of the GI tract
 
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This is a brief video detailing the main hormones in the GI tract, where they are localized, and their primary functions. I created this presentation with Google Slides. Image were created or taken from Wikimedia Commons I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor. ADDITIONAL TAGS: HORMONE LOCALIZATION MAIN PHYSIOLOGIC ACTIONS Gastrin Gastric antrum, duodenum (G cells) -stimulate secretion of gastric acid and intrinsic factor from parietal cells -stimulate secretion of pepsinogen from chief cells -promotes gastric and intestinal motility, mucosal growth Cholecystokinin (CCK) Duodenum, jejunum (I cells) -stimulate gallbladder contraction -stimulates release of pancreatic enzymes -relaxes sphincter of Oddi for release of bile and enzymes -role in inducing satiety Secretin Duodenum, jejunum (S cells) -stimulate secretion of HCO3 from pancreas -inhibits gastrin and gastric acid secretion Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) Enteric nerves -increases water and electrolyte secretion from pancreas and gut -relaxes smooth muscles (via nitric oxide) of the gut Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) Duodenum, jejunum (K cells) -reduces gastric acid secretion and intestinal motility -stimulates insulin release Motilin Throughout the gut (Mo cells and ECL cells) -increases small bowel motility (MMC during fasting) and gastric emptying Somatostatin Stomach, small intestine, and pancreas (D cells) -inhibits secretion and action of many hormones, including all of the above Digestive hormones in the GI tract
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Hormones and the Endocrine System
 
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This video was created by an amateur editor for a school project. Final compilation of Hormones and the Endocrine System. Created by: Angelica Cauntay Angelo Micko Catindig, Lorenzo Ortiz Luis Jeremiah Charles Nera. Acknowledgements are at the end of the video. Thanks for watching! See the links: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNLsXKkLSTs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBWIkKfbW8U https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qi6LYIhlFdw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBnBTkcr6No https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEsTIOIufiQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vae5CcaPN_8&list=PL81E318285B780C16 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nt2r5R0ZO5U UST AMV College of Accountancy
Просмотров: 556243 Angelica Cauntay
Science Gk In Hindi |  अन्तः स्त्रावी तंत्र ( Endocrine System )
 
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मानव शरीर के तंत्र : Endocrine System SSC CGL, CPO, CHSL, MPPSC,UPPCS, RAILWAYS EXAMS
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The Nervous System: Diencephalon - Thalamus & Hypothalamus
 
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The Thalamus and Hypothalamus are vital sections of the Diencephalon portion of the Forebrain. These areas play key roles in consolidating and integrating sensory inputs as well as linking the nervous system to the endocrine system. Due to this, these two structures are responsible for production of hormones and the regulation of our body rhythms. ---------------Table of Contents Thalamus: - Location within the brain - 0:35 - Functions of the Thalamus - 0:45 - Consolidate Sensory Inputs (Example) - 1:05 - Localizing Sensations - 1:26 - Regulation of Consciousness - 1:58 - Suppression of Minor / Background Stimuli 2:08 Hypothalamus: - Location within the brain - 2:27 - Functions of the Hypothalamus 2:37 - Reflex Responses to Emotional Stimulus - 2:55 - Body Rhythms (Circadian Rhythm) - 3:07 - Regulation of Food Intake - 3:49 - Peristalsis - 3:58 - Regulation of the Pituitary Gland - 4:21 - Releasing Factors - 4:51 - Affect on Endocrine System - Releasing hormones (TRH, GHRH) - 5:13 - Hormone Production (Oxytocin, ADH) - 5:35 ---------------Sources Used in this Video 1) Textbook of Basic Nursing (Lippincott's Practical Nursing) 10th Ed.Rosdahl, Caroline Bunker., and Mary T. Kowalski. "Chapter 19." Textbook of Basic Nursing. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2012. N. pag. Print. 2) Wolkowitz, Amanda. "Human Body Science." Study Manual for the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS): Reading, Mathematics, Science, and English and Language Usage. Stilwell, Kan.: Assessment Technologies Institute, 2010. 128. Print. 3) Scanlon, Valerie C., and Tina Sanders. "Chapter 8: The Nervous System."Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology. N.p.: n.p., n.d. N. pag. Print. 4) Gowin, Joshua. "Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland." Human Brain Student's Self-test Coloring Book. Place of Publication Not Identified: Barron'S, 2016. 114-20. Print. ---------------Media Attributions 1)By Bcjordan [CC BY 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons 2) By Upper body front.png: Mikael HäggströmBackground made transparent by Frédéric MICHELfor This image was improved or created by the Wikigraphists of the Graphic Lab (fr). You can propose images to clean up, improve, create or translate as well. derivative work: RexxS (Upper body front.png) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons 3) By Double-M from Athens, GA, USA (Surgical-Anatomical Tables by Anton Nuhn, 1846) [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons 4) By BruceBlaus. When using this image in external sources it can be cited as:Blausen.com staff (2014). "Medical gallery of Blausen Medical 2014". WikiJournal of Medicine 1 (2). DOI:10.15347/wjm/2014.010. ISSN 2002-4436. [CC BY 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons 5) By Searbear. When using this image in external sources it can be cited as:Embarrassed. https://www.flickr.com/photos/briovonsarah/5372890384/in/photostream/. [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], from Flickr
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6.5 - Nerves, Hormones and Homeostasis
 
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Need help with your Biology Internal Assessment? Check this out: facebook.com/IBWrite and www.ibwrite.net -------------- DP Biology topic 6.5 (Core).
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How the Endocrine System Works
 
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The endocrine system produces hormones, which help your body grow and function.
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