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What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome?
 
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Pre-order My New Book Today! ARE YOU OK? http://bit.ly/2s0mULy Links for more information on FASD: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fetal-alcohol-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20352901 https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/fasd/facts.html https://www.nofas.org/adults-living-with-fasd/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fetal_alcohol_spectrum_disorder A BIG THANK YOU to my Patreon Patrons! Without you, I couldn't keep creating videos. xoxo https://www.patreon.com/katimorton I'm Kati Morton, a licensed therapist making Mental Health videos! Business email: linnea@toneymedia.com Download my workbooks: visit Itunes and search for Kati Morton Mail: PO Box #665 1223 Wilshire Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90403 Help us caption & translate this video! https://amara.org/v/cjBR/
Просмотров: 27723 Kati Morton
Foetal (Fetal) Alcohol Syndrome
 
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Foetal/Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is the leading cause of Mental Retardation Worldwide. this Video shows the lifelong effects FAS Has on those afflicted. 1 in 6 Babies is born to parents with Alcohol Problems. Children who have some features of FAS but not the whole Syndrome may be diagnosed with Foetal/Fetal Alcohol Effects-FAE Which are part of the Foetal/Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders-FASD
Просмотров: 174404 Rasverix Xyleighraq
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome -- The Biological Basis / FAS FASD Video
 
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome -- The Biological Basis Courtesy of: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) 5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304 Bethesda, MD 20892-9304 Over 375,000 newborn babies have been exposed to drugs in utero. The film promotes zero tolerance for alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and drugs for all pregnant women. The purpose of the video is to promote awareness of the problem among teenagers who are at risk for both unplanned pregnancy and substance use. This gripping film take a serious, no-holds-barred look at what happens when pregnant women use alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The film includes an examination of prenatal drug and alcohol abuse, fetal alcohol syndrome, nicotine's effect on unborn babies, risks for AIDS, SIDS and FAS, drug effects at various stages of pregnancy, how drugs affect unborn babies and other relation social and emotional problems. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and a spectrum of associated disorders, sometimes called Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), is a permanent birth defect caused by maternal consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. The term fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND) is applied to children whose mothers are known to have drunk heavily during pregnancy and who exhibit some, but not all, features of alcohol-related facial malformation. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation in the Western world and is entirely preventable. It has been estimated that one in 1000 children born suffers from FAS, and one in 100 suffers milder effects (FAE) of maternal prenatal alcohol exposure. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) is committed to developing and implementing innovative ideas in prevention, education, intervention, and advocacy in communities both nationally and internationally. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) provides information and research on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) including referral information across the United States with a national and state directory; Web resources with an extensive list of sites that discuss FASD; the latest events and activities with an up-to-date calendar of events; and information on addressing FASD through the NOFAS programs. A. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is the severe end of a spectrum of effects that can occur when a woman drinks during pregnancy. Fetal death is the most extreme outcome. FAS is a disorder characterized by abnormal facial features, and growth and central nervous system (CNS) problems. If a pregnant woman drinks alcohol but her child does not have all of the symptoms of FAS, it is possible that her child has an alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND). Children with ARND do not have full FAS, but may demonstrate learning and behavioral problems caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Children with FAS are at risk for psychiatric problems, criminal behavior, unemployment, and incomplete education. These secondary conditions are problems that an individual is not born with, but might acquire as a result of FAS. These conditions can be very serious, yet there are protective factors that have been found to help individuals with these problems. For example, a child who is diagnosed early in life can be placed in appropriate educational classes and given access to social services that can help the child and his or her family. Children with FAS who receive special education are more likely to achieve their developmental and educational potential. In addition, children with FAS need a loving, nurturing, and stable home life in order to avoid disruptions, transient lifestyles, or harmful relationships. Children with FAS who live in abusive or unstable households or become involved in youth violence are much more likely to develop secondary conditions than children with FAS who have not had such negative experiences. For further assistance, contact NOFAS at 1-800-66-NOFAS.
Просмотров: 126269 rosaryfilms
Ultrasound Fetal Response To Alcohol Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
 
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Ultrasound Fetal Response To Alcohol Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Ultrasound Recording Of A Fetus Responding To Alcohol Video. Text excerpts (from Fair Use) from Jonathon Carr-Brown and Martyn Halle; The Sunday Times - Britain. November 20, 2005. Public domain video clip from www.timesonline.co.uk/sundaytimes. Royalty free music from the Music Bakery. SCIENTISTS have captured graphic ultrasound images of the damage done to unborn babies as a result of women drinking during pregnancy. Just one glass of wine a week can make babies "jump" in the womb throughout a nine-month pregnancy. Experts believe this abnormal hyperactive behavior is the result of alcohol slowing or retarding the formation of the central nervous system. Doctors have warned for decades that women who consume large amounts of alcohol during pregnancy can affect their child's mental development. However, the new research suggests even moderate alcohol consumption makes a baby 3½ times more likely to suffer from abnormal spasms in the womb. The findings, by Peter Hepper, a professor at Belfast University's fetal behavior research unit, appear to back the view that there is no safe level of alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Hepper's findings have surprised child neurology experts. Between conception and 18 weeks, babies display a primitive "startle reflex" which causes babies to jump involuntarily in the womb at loud noises and other stimuli. However, once the nervous system is fully formed at 18 weeks, the reflex disappears in healthy babies and is replaced by a calmer "adult" reflex. Hepper found that the babies of mothers who drank — whether one unit a week or four — all continued to display a "startle reflex" throughout their pregnancy. The reflex in the babies of the non-drinking mothers tailed off at 18 weeks. The professor also found that the babies of women who drank suffered more "startles" during the first 18 weeks. Hepper, who published his findings in the Journal of Physiology and Behaviour, concluded that even moderate consumption of alcohol had a serious effect on the formation of a baby's central nervous system. He explained: "This indicates that the nerve pathways in the brain have been damaged." Hepper concluded: "Our study shows that alcohol is having an effect on the baby even at low levels and that is quite disturbing. We don't think there is a safe limit for alcohol consumption in pregnancy." Hepper's study appears to corroborate US research, conducted after birth, which has shown that drinking during pregnancy lowers a child's IQ and increases hyperactivity. Some doctors believe the babies scanned by Hepper are showing the early signs of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) which is thought to cause a range of behavioral and neurological disorders in children. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Trust estimates that between 6,000 to 12,000 babies are affected in the UK each year. Margaret Burrows, a clinical geneticist at Leicester royal infirmary, said: "The startle movement (in the womb) is clearly not normal and would seem to indicate the child has the traits of fidgeting which we see in attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). "We believe that a proportion of children who have ADHD may have developed it as a result of their mother's drinking during pregnancy." The next stage of Hepper's study will monitor whether the babies go on to suffer mental and behavioral problems. Hepper presented the findings of his study of 40 pregnant women from the Royal Maternity hospital, Belfast, to the Royal Society of Medicine on Wednesday. None of the mothers was asked to drink but 20 admitted that they would continue to drink during their pregnancy. The other 20 drank no alcohol. Researchers questioned the 20 pregnant drinkers and found they consumed between one and four units of alcohol (four glasses of wine) a week. In the first half of the study all the women underwent three ultrasound scans during the first 18 weeks of their pregnancy. In the second half, the women had four more scans at 20, 25, 30 and 35 weeks. The scans lasted up to 45 minutes to try to capture hyperactivity. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE), Partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (pFAS), Alcohol Related Neurodevelopmental Disorders (ARND), Static Encephalopathy Alcohol Exposed (SEAE) and Alcohol Related Birth Defects (ARBD) are all names for a spectrum of disorders caused when a pregnant woman consumes alcohol. FASD is 100% preventable. If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, don't drink any beverage alcohol. There is no known safe level. To ignore the facts does not change the facts.
Просмотров: 309449 rosaryfilms
Deformities That You Might Have
 
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Yeah, I'm gonna go ahead and get a pop filter before I do my next video. The more people point it out the more I notice how annoying it is. Intro and outro song: "Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G, Movement I (Allegro), BWV 1049" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Просмотров: 2241201 Sam O'Nella Academy
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in Mental Health ... Settings: Counselor Toolbox Episode 118
 
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A direct link to the CEU course is https://www.allceus.com/member/cart/index/product/id/127/c/ AllCEUs provides #counseloreducation and CEUs for LPCs, LMHCs, LMFTs and LCSWs as well as #addiction counselor precertification training and continuing education. Live, Interactive Webinars ($5): https://www.allceus.com/live-interactive-webinars/ Unlimited Counseling CEs for $59 https://www.allceus.com/ #AddictionCounselor and #RecoveryCoach https://www.allceus.com/certificate-tracks/ Pinterest: drsnipes Podcast: https://www.allceus.com/counselortoolbox/ Nurses, addiction and #mentalhealth #counselors, #socialworkers and marriage and family#therapists can earn #CEUs for this and other presentations at AllCEUs.com #AllCEUs courses are accepted in most states because we are approved as an education provider for NAADAC, the States of Florida and Texas Boards of Social Work and Mental Health/Professional Counseling, the California Consortium for Addiction Professionals and Professions. This was recorded as part of a live #webinar
Просмотров: 179 AllCEUs Counseling Education
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome & Fetal Alcohol Effects Video Part 1
 
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Fetal alcohol syndrome is among the most common known causes of mental retardation and as such, it is a major public health problem. Lecturer Dr. Ed Riley Department of Psychology San Diego State University Center for Behavior Teratology 6363 Alverado Court, Suite 209 San Diego, Ca 92120 Editor Dr. Carrie Randall Medical University of South Carolina Institute of Psychiatry Center for Drug & Alcohol Programs 171 Ashley Avenue Charleston, SC 29425-0742 References Stratton, K., Howe, C., & Battaglia, F. (1996). Fetal alcohol syndrome: Diagnosis, epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Streissguth, A. P. (1997). Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Guide for Families and Communities. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. Jones, K. L., & Smith, D. W. (1973). Recognition of the fetal alcohol syndrome in early infancy. Lancet, 2, 999-1001. Jones, K. L., Smith, D. W., Ulleland, C. N., & Streissguth, A. P. (1973). Pattern of malformation in offspring of chronic alcoholic mothers. Lancet, 1, 1267-1271. Lemoine, P., Harousseau, H., Borteyru, J.-P., & Menuet, J.-C. (1968). Les enfants de parents alcooliques: Anomalies observees. A propos de 127 cas [Children of alcoholic parents: Abnormalities observed in 127 cases]. Ouest Medical, 21, 476-482. Rosett, H. L. a. W., L. (1984). Alcohol and the Fetus: A Clinical Perspective. New York: Oxford University Press. Egeland G, Perham-Hester KA, Gessner BD, Ingle D, Berner JE,Middaugh JP. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in Alaska, 1977 through 1992: An administrative prevalence derived from multiple data sources. American Journal of Public Health. 1998. 88(5): 781-786. Aberdeen IHS Area (1995) MMWR. vol 44(#):253-261. BDMP (1995): MMWR Vol. 44(13):249-253. Atlanta, Ga. (1997) MMWR Vol. 46(47): 1118-1120. Sampson, P. D., Streissguth, A. P., Bookstein, F. L., Little, R. E., Clarren, S. K., Dehaene, P., Hanson, J. W., & Graham, J. M., Jr. (1997). Incidence of fetal alcohol syndrome and prevalence of alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder. Teratology, 56(5), 317-326. Stratton, K., Howe, C., & Battaglia, F. (1996). Fetal alcohol syndrome: Diagnosis, epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Institute of Medicine: 1996 Clinic-based (page 89), American Indian/Alaskan Native (page 88)May, P., Viljoen, D., Gossage, J., Brooke, L., Croxford, J. (1999). An epidemiological analysis of data from children with fetal alcohol syndrome and controls in Wellington, South Africa. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 23 (5), 110A.May, P., Viljoen, D., Gossage, J., Brooke, L., Croxford, J (1999). An update on the maternal risk factors associated with the prevalence of fetal alcohol syndrome in Wellington, South Africa. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 23 (5), 91A Streissguth, A. P. (1994). A long-term perspective of FAS , Alcohol Health & Research World (Vol. 18, pp. 74-81). Clarren, S. K. (1986). Neuropathology in fetal alcohol syndrome. In J. R. West (Ed.), Alcohol and Brain Development (pp. 158-166). New York: Oxford University Press. Roebuck, T.M., Mattson, S.N., and Riley, E.P. (1998). A review of the neuroanatomical findings in children with fetal alcohol syndrome or prenatal exposure to alcohol. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 22 (2),339-344. Mattson, S. N., Jernigan, T. L., & Riley, E. P. (1994a). MRI and prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol Health & Research World, 18(1), 49-52. Archibald, S.L., Fennema-Notestine, C., Gamst, A., Riley, E.P., Mattson, S.N., and Jernigan, T.L. (submitted, 2000). Brain dysmorphology in individuals with severe prenatal alcohol exposure. Mattson, S. N., Jernigan, T. L., & Riley, E. P. (1994a). MRI and prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol Health & Research World, 18(1), 49-52. Mattson, S. N., & Riley, E. P. (1995). Prenatal exposure to alcohol: What the images reveal. Alcohol Health & Research World, 19(4), 273-277. Riley, E. P., Mattson, S. N., Sowell, E. R., Jernigan, T. L., Sobel, D. F., & Jones, K. L. (1995). Abnormalities of the corpus callosum in children prenatally exposed to alcohol. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 19(5), 1198-1202. Streissguth AP, Aase JM, Clarren SK, Randels SP, LaDue RA, Smith DF (1991). Fetal alcohol syndrome in adolescents and adults. Journal of the American Medical Association 265:1961-1967. Mattson, S.N., Riley, E.P., Gramling, L., Delis, D.C., and Jones, K.L. (1997). Heavy prenatal alcohol exposure with or without physical features of fetal alcohol syndrome leads to IQ deficits. Journal of Pediatrics, 131 (5), 718-721. Mattson, S.N. and Riley, E.P. (1998). A review of the neurobehavioral deficits in children with fetal alcohol syndrome or prenatal exposure to alcohol. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 22 (2), 279-294. Public domain video.
Просмотров: 49499 rosaryfilms
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome & Spectrum Disorders / FAS FASD Video
 
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Over 375,000 newborn babies have been exposed to drugs in utero. The film promotes zero tolerance for alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and drugs for all pregnant women. This film describes the effects of exposure to alcohol and drugs on the fetus during pregnancy. The purpose is to promote awareness of the problem among teenagers who are at risk for both unplanned pregnancy and substance use. Medical experts offer information and mothers of drug-exposed babies share their stories. A foursome of engaging young people present an in-depth exploration of the growing problem of prenatal alcohol and other drug abuse. Produced in the stylish, fast-paced format popular with today's teens, this gripping film take a serious, no-holds-barred look at what happens when pregnant women use alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The film includes an examination of prenatal drug and alcohol abuse, fetal alcohol syndrome, nicotine's effect on unborn babies, risks for AIDS, SIDS and FAS, drug effects at various stages of pregnancy, how drugs affect unborn babies and other relation social and emotional problems. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and a spectrum of associated disorders, sometimes called Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), is a permanent birth defect caused by maternal consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. The term fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND) is applied to children whose mothers are known to have drunk heavily during pregnancy and who exhibit some, but not all, features of alcohol-related facial malformation. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation in the Western world and is entirely preventable. It has been estimated that one in 1000 children born suffers from FAS, and one in 100 suffers milder effects (FAE) of maternal prenatal alcohol exposure. Fetal Marijuana Syndrome (FMS) is also briefly discussed. This public service announcement film, "...And Down Will Come Baby," is produced by the Scott Newman Center and is publically funded by the U.S. Department of Education under a Drug Free School and Communities Act grant, paid for by the American taxpayers and tax-paying businesses and republished here as a public domain video for the general public. For more information on the Scott Newman Center, pleasee see: http://www.scottnewmancenter.org/pamphlets.html
Просмотров: 260888 rosaryfilms
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
 
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Families with children affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder share how this disability impacts on their lives. Follow Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/attitudetv Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/attitude_tv See more Videos: http://attitudelive.com
Просмотров: 183081 Attitude
Transforming Stigma™ in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder (FASD)
 
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http://www.TransformingStigma.com. In this video, Mike Veny is delivering to his Transforming Stigma into Strength speech to birth mothers of children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). This presentation is typically delivered at mental health events, however the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (MOFAS) believed that his message could help the birth moms of babies with FASD. In the spirit of transparency, Mike had some negative feelings about birth moms of children with FASD prior to meeting the people at the Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. He soon learned about the myths surrounding FASD. One of the myths as that only mothers with alcohol and/or substance abuse problems have babies with FASD. THIS IS NOT TRUE! More than half of new pregnancies are unplanned. In fact, many women are approximately 3 months into their pregnancy before they are even aware of it. Because of they aren't aware, they may drink alcohol without realizing they are harming their baby. Also, many people believe that a baby will outgrow any problems caused by drinking during pregnancy. The truth is that the damage caused to a baby by prenatal alcohol exposure is permanent. Therefore, it is CRITICAL that children with FASD begin getting the help and treatment they need AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. For the birth mothers, the biggest challenge is the burden they bear for the rest of their life, knowing that the their decision(s) caused permanent damage to their child. Mike Veny offers words of support to encourage mothers to learn to FORGIVE themselves. What makes this difficult is the reality that, even if they do eventually forgive themselves, many people in society won't. Whether it's Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder or mental health, it's important that we take responsibility in transforming stigma. No one should have to live with shame. No one should have to live in silence. No one should have to sabotage, engage in self-destructive behavior, or attempt suicide. To learn more visit, http://www.TransformingStigma.com Follow Mike Veny on Twitter - http://Twitter.com/MikeVeny Find Mike Veny on Facebook - http://Facebook.Com/MikeVeny
Просмотров: 344 Mike Veny
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - FASD - 2
 
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How To Support Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - FASD What Is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome? Highlights When a pregnant person drinks alcohol, some of that alcohol easily passes across the placenta to the fetus. People with this condition may have problems with their vision, hearing, memory, attention span, and abilities to learn and communicate. You can prevent fetal alcohol syndrome by avoiding alcohol during pregnancy. Women who drink alcohol during pregnancy can give birth to babies with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (sometimes known as FASD). FASD is the umbrella term for a range of disorders. These disorders can be mild or severe and can cause physical and mental birth defects. Types of FASD include: fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) partial fetal alcohol syndrome alcohol-related birth defects alcohol-related neurodevelopment disorder neurobehavioral disorder associated with prenatal alcohol exposure FAS is a severe form of the condition. People with FAS may have problems with their vision, hearing, memory, attention span, and abilities to learn and communicate. While the defects vary from one person to another, the damage is often permanent. A key to supporting students with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder (FASD) is having a good understanding of FASD and how individuals with FASD are impacted. This resource provides an explanation of FASD, its impact on the brain as well as explores behavioural patterns in students with FASD. Strategies for designing classroom instruction and routines to support students with FASD are also highlighted. Module Two explores the difference between brain structure and brain function and provides educators with strategies for becoming active problem solvers. Enjoy and stay connected with us!! Subscribe to My Health Channel for daily videos. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwOoPOwnExqVrkciOnyFtBg Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/Tizzyworld1
Просмотров: 639 My Health Channel
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
 
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During pregnancy, the fetus receives all the nutrients it needs to grow and develop through the placenta. If a woman drinks alcohol (also known as ethanol) during pregnancy, the alcohol in her blood passes through the placenta to the fetus, posing a risk for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, or FAS. The mechanisms by which alcohol acts on and interferes with normal fetal development and whether there is an amount of alcohol consumption which does not place the fetus at risk of FAS are still largely unknown. It is thought the developing fetal brain may be highly sensitive to alcohol. During normal neurotransmission, neurons release chemicals that bind to receptors on other neurons thereby propagating a signal. Ethanol may block certain receptors in the fetal brain which can damage neural tissue. Another theory is that ethanol may constrict blood vessels in the umbilical cord impairing blood flow to the fetus, thereby decreasing the amount of nutrients essential to fetal growth. FAS can cause life-long mental and physical defects for the fetus. Some characteristics of FAS may include: - Low birth weight - Facial abnormalities - Small head size - Organ dysfunction - Behavioral problems - Mental retardation - Slow growth and poor coordination There is no known safe amount of alcohol to drink during pregnancy. Pregnant women should either not drink any alcohol or should seek medical advice if they have questions.
Просмотров: 4946 medicine videos
Dr. Michael Trew on FASD (full 2 minute version)
 
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In this two-minute video, leading pediatrician Dr. Gail Andrew and Alberta Health’s Chief Addiction and Mental Health officer, Dr. Michael Trew discuss Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). It’s part of an awareness partnership between the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission, a member of the Government of Alberta’s cross-ministry partnership to address FASD, and CTV2. FASD is caused by alcohol exposure in the womb and is 100 per cent preventable when a woman has the right supports.
Просмотров: 838 AGLC
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - FASD - 1
 
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How To Support Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - FASD What Is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome? Highlights When a pregnant person drinks alcohol, some of that alcohol easily passes across the placenta to the fetus. People with this condition may have problems with their vision, hearing, memory, attention span, and abilities to learn and communicate. You can prevent fetal alcohol syndrome by avoiding alcohol during pregnancy. Women who drink alcohol during pregnancy can give birth to babies with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (sometimes known as FASD). FASD is the umbrella term for a range of disorders. These disorders can be mild or severe and can cause physical and mental birth defects. Types of FASD include: fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) partial fetal alcohol syndrome alcohol-related birth defects alcohol-related neurodevelopment disorder neurobehavioral disorder associated with prenatal alcohol exposure FAS is a severe form of the condition. People with FAS may have problems with their vision, hearing, memory, attention span, and abilities to learn and communicate. While the defects vary from one person to another, the damage is often permanent. A key to supporting students with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder (FASD) is having a good understanding of FASD and how individuals with FASD are impacted. This resource provides an explanation of FASD, its impact on the brain as well as explores behavioural patterns in students with FASD. Strategies for designing classroom instruction and routines to support students with FASD are also highlighted. Module One provides clear explanations of how prenatal alcohol exposure affects brain development. Enjoy and stay connected with us!! Subscribe to My Health Channel for daily videos. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwOoPOwnExqVrkciOnyFtBg Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/Tizzyworld1
Просмотров: 1971 My Health Channel
What Corrections Need to Know about FASD
 
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Educational video targeted to the criminal court and corrections professionals to raise awareness about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), the leading preventable cause of mental retardation, focusing on the impact of prenatal alcohol exposure to brain functioning and subsequent legal implications. This video can be used at corrections facilities, social service agencies, courts, schools, and other public and private service agencies. Other health education resources are available at www.cadfp.org. Partners in the development of this video include the Santa Clara County Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Task Force, Santa Clara County Superior Court, District Attorney's Office, Probation Departments, March of Dimes and Jumpcutters Video.
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)
 
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Recovering Hope is an intimate and evocative video about the mothers and families of children who are affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). The video, created for viewing by women in recovery and their counselors, is divided into to half-hour episodes to allow time for discussion within a treatment session. Eight women tell poignant, memorable stories. They speak out about how alcohol use during pregnancy affected their children, how they are learning effective new ways to parent, and how they are recovering hope for the future. Six researchers and clinicians support these stories by explaining the physical, mental, behavioral and learning disabilities associated with FASD and discussing evaluation and intervention services For more information: SAMHSA's Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator http://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/ 1-800-662-HELP (English & Español) 1-800-487-4889 (TDD) 2. National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information http://ncadi.samhsa.gov/ 800) 729-6686 TDD: (800) 487-4889 Español: (877) 767-8432 3. SAMHSA's FASD Center for Excellence http://www.fasdcenter.samhsa.gov/ 1-866-STOPFAS (786-7327) 4. The Organization of Teratology Information Specialists (OTIS) http://www.otispregnancy.org National Toll-Free Number, (866) 626-OTIS, or (866) 626-6847 En Español, llame gratis al (866) 626-6847 y oprime el 1 5. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) http://www.nofas.org/default.aspx (202) 785-4585, +1 (800) 66NOFAS
Просмотров: 229941 SAMHSA
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Facial Features
 
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Facial Features Complete Guide : http://tinyurl.com/zec564q Fetal alcohol syndrome will be the manifestation of particular growth, mental, and physical birth defects for this mother's high levels of alcohol use throughout pregnancy. Fetal alcohol exposure will be the leading known cause of mental retardation under western culture. If you take in during pregnancy, you place your baby prone to fetal alcohol affliction. The defects which have been part of fetal booze syndrome are irreversible and can include serious physical, mind and behavioral difficulties, though they changes from one child completely to another. As many as 40, 000 babies are usually born with a alcohol-related damage each year in the states. Consumption of alcohol by a pregnant woman could be the first indicator associated with potential fetal booze syndrome. FAS is a group of problems that range from birth defects, irregular facial features, development problems, problems while using central nervous process, trouble remembering and/or mastering vision or reading problems and Behaviour problems. The severity of warning signs varies, with some children experiencing them to a far greater degree than some others. Women who are active and use effective contraception should also refrain from drinking. Multiple birth defects linked to "classical" fetal alcohol syndrome are more commonly associated along with heavy alcohol make use of or alcoholism. More Information : http://tinyurl.com/zec564q pictures of fetal alcohol babies fetal alcohol syndrome characteristics fetal alcohol syndrome pictures adults fetal alcohol syndrome mental effects facial features of fas children fetal alcohol effects behavior
Просмотров: 36940 Alcohol Challenge
FASD mental health.mov
 
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FASD - A Neuropsychiatric Condition
Просмотров: 82 barry stanley
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Which Countries Have It Most?
 
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A study from the Center for Addiction and Mental Health has found that 119,000 children are born with fetal alcohol syndrome, or FAS, each year worldwide. According to UPI, fetal alcohol syndrome is a preventable birth defect caused by heavy alcohol use during pregnancy. Symptoms of the syndrome include developmental disabilities, distinct facial features, low birth weight and stature among other disorders. Researchers compared the proportion of women who drink alcohol during pregnancy with the incidence of FAS globally. Results showed nearly 10 percent of women drink alcohol during pregnancy worldwide and the prevalence varies based on regions of the world. Certain countries had nearly 45 percent of women report drinking alcohol during pregnancy. The study showed that Russia, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Belarus and Ireland had the highest rate of alcohol use during pregnancy. Countries in the Eastern Mediterranean and South East Asia had the lowest rates of alcohol use during pregnancy and FAS. The researchers concluded it is best to completely abstain from consuming alcohol during pregnancy. http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/01/13/New-report-shows-prevalence-of-fetal-alcohol-syndrome-worldwide/2111484322104/ http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
Просмотров: 468 Wochit News
Fetal alcohol disorders are more common than you think
 
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Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, a possible result from mothers drinking during pregnancy, has flown under the radar for decades. Now new conservative estimates published in The Journal of the American Medical Association show that anywhere from 1.1 to 5 percent of the U.S. population is affected, meaning it could be more common than autism. Amna Nawaz reports. Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Просмотров: 5143 PBS NewsHour
Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder impacts you, but you don’t know it | Nora Boesem | TEDxRapidCity
 
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As a foster mother to children with FASD, Nora Boesem has seen the effects of alcohol first hand. However, FASD often goes undiagnosed and is creating a burden on us all. Nora Boesem and her husband began fostering in 2011 and have fostered over 100 children for the state of SD and the Oglala Lakota Sioux Tribe. Nora realized there was no help for families and founded Roots to Wings in 2008, a non-profit to help advocate and support people living with FASD. In 2008 she also started a parenting group with the support of BMS in Rapid City, SD that still runs today and has now expanded into a beginners group and an advanced parenting group. In 2009 she was appointed to the Governor’s mental health board, joined the Chiesman Center for FASD and began speaking around the state of SD and around the US. Returning to school she earned her BS in psychology and is currently in her last year of her MSW at Arizona State University. In 2014 Nora joined BMS in a program she spearheads called Facing FASD. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
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Dr. Michael Trew on FASD (1 minute short version)
 
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In this one-minute video, Alberta Health’s Chief Addiction and Mental Health Officer, Dr. Michael Trew, discusses Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). It’s part of an awareness partnership between the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission, a member of the Government of Alberta’s cross-ministry partnership to address FASD, and CTV2. FASD is caused by alcohol exposure in the womb and is 100 per cent preventable when a woman has the right supports.
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome by Dr.Lekhansh Shukla
 
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Capacity building in the area of Mental health and Substance use
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome:  A Pregnant Woman Never Drinks Alone
 
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Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), which includes Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, is the only birth defect that is 100 percent preventable. It is caused by a mother drinking alcohol during pregnancy and can result in birth defects, intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, attention deficits and behavior disorders. The N.C. Department of Health and Human Services Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services hopes to prevent the effect of FASD through educating women about the dangers of alcohol during pregnancy.
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders by Bruce Ritchie FASD Video
 
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Excellent presentation by Bruce Ritchie on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders (FASD) to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, Standing Committee on Social Policy, Bill 118, Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. Posted with permission from Bruce Ritchie. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE), Partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (pFAS), Alcohol Related Neurodevelopmental Disorders (ARND), Static Encephalopathy Alcohol Exposed (SEAE) and Alcohol Related Birth Defects (ARBD) are all names for a spectrum of disorders caused when a pregnant woman consumes alcohol. FASD is 100% preventable. If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, don't drink any beverage alcohol. There is no known safe level. To ignore the facts does not change the facts. Invisible Disabilities - An individual's place, and success, in society is almost entirely determined by neurological functioning. A child with a brain injury is unable to meet the expectations of parents, family, peers, school, and career and can endure a lifetime of failures. The largest cause of brain injury in children is prenatal exposure to alcohol. Often the neurological damage goes undiagnosed, but not unpunished. There are strategies that can work to help the child with an FASD compensate for some difficulties. Early diagnosis and intensive intervention and tutoring can do wonders, but the need for a supportive structure is permanent. Prenatal alcohol exposure has been linked to more than 60 disease conditions, birth defects and disabilities. Damage is a diverse continuum from mild intellectual and behavioural issues to profound disabilities or premature death. Prenatal alcohol damage varies due to volume ingested, timing during pregnancy, peak blood alcohol levels, genetics and environmental factors. For example, ethanol interacts with over 1000 genes and cell events, including cell signalling, transport and proliferation. Alcohol supresses serotonin production. Serotonin suppression causes loss of neurons and glia, inducing excessive cell death during normal programmed death (apoptosis) or triggering apoptosis at inappropriate times leading to smaller or abnormal brain structures with fewer connections between brain cells, leading to fewer cells for dopamine production, leading to problems with addiction, memory, attention and problem solving, and more pronounced conditions such as schizophrenia. As FASD is a diverse continuum, issues range from almost imperceptible to profound. It is somewhere in the middle that the issues attract the attention of parents, educators, medical and social work professionals, and eventually the justice system. Most of the issues that attract sufficient attention are behavioural and performance issues. It is probable that 10% to 15% of children are significantly enough affected by prenatal alcohol exposure to require special education. As they become adults, FASD does not disappear but the issues of youth translate into ongoing problems in family relationships, employment, mental health and justice conflicts. The cost to the individuals affected, their families and society are enormous and as a society, we cannot afford to ignore them. About 50% of pregnancies are unplanned. "If you drink, don't have sex. If you have sex, don't drink. Prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)" Most girls are 2 to 3 months pregnant before they find out and the baby may well have been to many parties before the pregnancy is confirmed. Maternal prenatal alcohol consumption even at low levels is adversely related to child behavior. The effect was observed at average exposure levels as low as 1 drink per week. Even brief exposures to small amounts of alcohol may kill brain cells in a developing fetus. A study carried out by John Olney, M.D., at the Washington School of Medicine in St. Louis showed that just two drinks consumed during pregnancy may be enough to kill some developing brain cells, leading to permanent brain damage. FASD is not a threshold condition. It is a diverse continuum ranging from mild intellectual and behavioural issues to the extreme that often leads to profound disabilities or premature death. At the mild end, damage may be the loss of some intellectual functioning (IQ), visual problems and higher than normal pain tolerance. At the severe end, damage may be severe loss of intellectual potential, severe vision problems, dyslexia, serious maxilo-facial deformities, dental abnormalities, heart defects, immune system malfunctioning, behavioral problems, attention deficit disorders, hyper-activity, extreme impulsiveness, poor judgment, little or no retained memory, deafness, little or no capacity for moral judgment or interpersonal empathy, sociopathic behaviour, epilepsy, tremors, cerebral palsy, renal failure, heart failure, death. For more information, please visit: http://www.faslink.org/
Просмотров: 6516 rosaryfilms
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
 
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Being an adolescent male can be hard. But add to that an invisible disability affecting how you learn, how you think and how you behave… it can soon become a nightmare. Daniel and Jakob are two teenagers coming to terms with a surprisingly common, yet largely misunderstood disability - Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Follow Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/attitudetv Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/attitude_tv See more Videos: http://attitudelive.com
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Shocking New Research On Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Revealed
 
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https://www.stopdrinkingexpert.com/fetal-alcohol-spectrum-disorder-research/ Even more youngsters from the United States could be living with a brain injury from their mother’s prenatal drinking than specialists have assumed, a new report proposes. The study of several American communities discovered that at least 1.5 percent to 5.5 percent of first-graders had a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder of some description (FASD). The occurrence varied depending on the community. And when the researchers used a less-strict estimation process, the level went as large as TEN percentage points in one place.
Просмотров: 1417 Stop Drinking Expert
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome In Adults
 
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome In Adults Complete Guide : http://tinyurl.com/zec564q Fetal Alcoholic beverages syndrom is an invisible increase crashing lower and overwhelming public methods. Patients together with fetal alcohol syndrome routinely have multiple frustrations and demand special healthcare, educational, familial and community assistance. A infant born together with FAS could possibly be seriously impaired and demand a lifetime connected with special proper care. In america, about 1, 200 young children are born each year with fetal alcohol syndrome. Is it doesn't leading cause of mental retardation on this country. When a woman products alcohol while in pregnancy, she risks pregnancy to a youngster who will probably pay the price- throughout mental and physical deficiencies- for entire life. It is usually a pattern connected with mental and physical problems which develops in certain unborn babies when the mother drinks a lot of alcohol while in pregnancy. People together with FAS might experience learning, storage, attention span, communication, vision, hearing, or a mixture of these. These issues often produce difficulties throughout school and problems getting in conjunction with others. Fetal alcohol syndrome incorporates a characteristic selection of defects which include small brain and mind, facial abnormalities, and defects connected with other organs. Babies delivered with FAS often weigh less and be shorter compared to normal. This ability classifies this medically as being a teratogen. Alcohol is actually recognized because the leading teratogen to which the fetus might be exposed. The syndrome is found in all racial and socio-economic communities. If a person suspect your child possesses FAS, talk on your doctor at the earliest opportunity. Early examination reduces the risk of issues in life associated with FAS, which include troubles from school, with drug abuse and with all the law. There's no cure with regard to FAS; nonetheless, with early on identification and diagnosis, children together with FAS could receive services to help increase their own potential. Download Now : http://tinyurl.com/zec564q fetal alcohol effects in adults adult behaviors fetal alcohol syndrome adults with fas behavior problems fetal alcohol behavior problems fasd in older adults fetal alcohol syndrome characteristics
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MY MENTAL ILLNESS - TRISHA PAYTAS DELETED VIDEO
 
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About Sean Van der wilt, her gay ex-boyfriend. She deleted this because he's a "class act."
Просмотров: 136752 FrootLoop
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 06 / FAS FASD Educational Training Video
 
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The following training video on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is produced by the Washington State Department of Social Services and is part of the Foster Parent Webcast Archive. Carolyn Hartness and Julie Gelo are outstanding presenters. This thorough overview of FAS and FAE and intervention strategies should be required viewing for all who care for or treat children or adults with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Video courtesy of the Foster Parent Training Institute of the Division of Licensed Resources. "Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)" and "Fetal Alcohol Related Conditions" with Carolyn Harness and Julie Gelo. Hartness, a member of the Governor's Commission on Indian Affairs, is an advocate and educator with many years of experience with FAS. Julie Gelo, a foster and adoptive parent, is co-trainer with the Foster Parent Institute. Over 375,000 newborn babies have been exposed to drugs in utero. The film promotes zero tolerance for alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and drugs for all pregnant women. The purpose of the video is to promote awareness of the problem among teenagers who are at risk for both unplanned pregnancy and substance use. This gripping film take a serious, no-holds-barred look at what happens when pregnant women use alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The film includes an examination of prenatal drug and alcohol abuse, fetal alcohol syndrome, nicotine's effect on unborn babies, risks for AIDS, SIDS and FAS, drug effects at various stages of pregnancy, how drugs affect unborn babies and other relation social and emotional problems. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and a spectrum of associated disorders, sometimes called Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), is a permanent birth defect caused by maternal consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. The term fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND) is applied to children whose mothers are known to have drunk heavily during pregnancy and who exhibit some, but not all, features of alcohol-related facial malformation. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation in the Western world and is entirely preventable. It has been estimated that one in 1000 children born suffers from FAS, and one in 100 suffers milder effects (FAE) of maternal prenatal alcohol exposure. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) is committed to developing and implementing innovative ideas in prevention, education, intervention, and advocacy in communities both nationally and internationally. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) provides information and research on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) including referral information across the United States with a national and state directory; Web resources with an extensive list of sites that discuss FASD; the latest events and activities with an up-to-date calendar of events; and information on addressing FASD through the NOFAS programs. A. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is the severe end of a spectrum of effects that can occur when a woman drinks during pregnancy. Fetal death is the most extreme outcome. FAS is a disorder characterized by abnormal facial features, and growth and central nervous system (CNS) problems. If a pregnant woman drinks alcohol but her child does not have all of the symptoms of FAS, it is possible that her child has an alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND). Children with ARND do not have full FAS, but may demonstrate learning and behavioral problems caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Children with FAS are at risk for psychiatric problems, criminal behavior, unemployment, and incomplete education. These secondary conditions are problems that an individual is not born with, but might acquire as a result of FAS. These conditions can be very serious, yet there are protective factors that have been found to help individuals with these problems. For example, a child who is diagnosed early in life can be placed in appropriate educational classes and given access to social services that can help the child and his or her family. Children with FAS who receive special education are more likely to achieve their developmental and educational potential. In addition, children with FAS need a loving, nurturing, and stable home life in order to avoid disruptions, transient lifestyles, or harmful relationships. Children with FAS who live in abusive or unstable households or become involved in youth violence are much more likely to develop secondary conditions than children with FAS who have not had such negative experiences.
Просмотров: 13166 rosaryfilms
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders by Bruce Ritchie FASD Video
 
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Excellent presentation by Bruce Ritchie on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders (FASD) to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, Standing Committee on Social Policy, Bill 118, Accessibility for Ontarians. Save on cheap dental bills! Little has been done for adults with FASD in Australia. This video is the first of several videos for adults with FASD. This one tells of the issues that are likely to crop up for adults with. Educational video targeted to judges, lawyers and other court professionals to raise awareness about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), the leading preventable cause of mental retardation,.
Просмотров: 5 Kadin Schmitt
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome:- Countries With Highest Rate
 
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A study from the Center for Addiction and Mental Health has found that 119,000 children are born with fetal alcohol syndrome, or FAS, each year worldwide. According to UPI, fetal alcohol syndrome is a preventable birth defect caused by heavy alcohol use during pregnancy. Symptoms of the syndrome include developmental disabilities, distinct facial features, low birth weight and stature among other disorders. Researchers compared the proportion of women who drink alcohol during pregnancy with the incidence of FAS globally. Results showed nearly 10 percent of women drink alcohol during pregnancy worldwide and the prevalence varies based on regions of the world. Certain countries had nearly 45 percent of women report drinking alcohol during pregnancy. The study showed that Russia, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Belarus and Ireland had the highest rate of alcohol use during pregnancy. Countries in the Eastern Mediterranean and South East Asia had the lowest rates of alcohol use during pregnancy and FAS. The researchers concluded it is best to completely abstain from consuming alcohol during pregnancy.
Просмотров: 35 HealthFeed Network
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome & Fetal Alcohol Effects Video Part 2
 
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Fetal alcohol syndrome is among the most common known causes of mental retardation and as such, it is a major public health problem. Lecturer Dr. Ed Riley Department of Psychology San Diego State University Center for Behavior Teratology 6363 Alverado Court, Suite 209 San Diego, Ca 92120 Editor Dr. Carrie Randall Medical University of South Carolina Institute of Psychiatry Center for Drug & Alcohol Programs 171 Ashley Avenue Charleston, SC 29425-0742 References Mattson, S. N., Riley, E. P., Gramling, L., Delis, D. C., & Jones, K. L. (1998). Neuropsychological comparison of alcohol-exposed children with or without physical features of fetal alcohol syndrome. Neuropsychology, 12(1), 146-153. Carmichael O.H., Feldman JJ, Streissguth AP, Gonzalez RD: Neuropsychological deficits and life adjustment in adolescents and adults with fetal alcohol syndrome. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 16:380, 1992 Kodituwakku PW, Handmaker NS, Cutler SK, Weathersby EK, Handmaker SD: Specific impairments in self-regulation in children exposed to alcohol prenatally. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 19:1558-1564, 1995 Mattson, S. N., Goodman, A. M., Caine, C., Delis, D. C., & Riley, E. P. (1999). Executive functioning in children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 23(11), 1808-1815. Streissguth, A. P., Barr, H. M., Kogan, J., & Bookstein, F. L. (1996). Final Report: Understanding the occurrence of secondary disabilities in clients with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and fetal alcohol effects (FAE). Seattle, WA: University of Washington Publication Services. Driscoll, C. D., Streissguth, A. P., & Riley, E. P. (1990). Prenatal alcohol exposure: Comparability of effects in humans and animal models. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 12, 231-237. Samson, H. H. (1986). Microcephaly and fetal alcohol syndrome: Human and animal studies. In J. R. West (Ed.), Alcohol and Brain Development (pp. 167-183). New York: Oxford University Press. Kotch, L. E., and Sulik, K.K. Experimental fetal alcohol syndrome: Proposed pathogenic basis for a variety of associate craniofacial and brain anomalies. Am. J. Med. Genet. 44, 168-176, 1992. Sulik, K. K., & Johnston, M. C. (1982). Embryonic origin of holoprosencephaly: Interrelationship of the developing brain and face , Scanning Electron Microscopy (Vol. 1, pp. 309-322). West, J.R., Chen, W-J. A., & Pantazis, N.J. (1994) Fetal alcohol syndrome: The vulnerability of the developing brain and possible mechanisms of damage. Metabolic Brain Disease, 9, 291-322. Sowell ER; Jernigan TL; Mattson SN; Riley EP; Sobel DF; Jones KL. Abnormal development of the cerebellar vermis in children prenatally exposed to alcohol: size reduction in lobules I-V. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 1996, 20(1):31-4. Pierce.D. R., and West, J.R. (1987) differential deficits in regional brain growth inducted by postnatal alcohol. Nuerotox. And Terat. 9, 129-141. Thomas, J.D., Goodlett, C. r. (1998) Alcohol-induced Purkinje cell loss depends on developmental timing of alcohol exposure and correlates with motor performance. Dev. Brain Res. 165, 159-166. Public domain video.
Просмотров: 12918 rosaryfilms
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 01 / FAS FASD Educational Training Video
 
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The following training video on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is produced by the Washington State Department of Social Services and is part of the Foster Parent Webcast Archive. Carolyn Hartness and Julie Gelo are outstanding presenters. This thorough overview of FAS and FAE and intervention strategies should be required viewing for all who care for or treat children or adults with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Video courtesy of the Foster Parent Training Institute of the Division of Licensed Resources. "Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)" and "Fetal Alcohol Related Conditions" with Carolyn Harness and Julie Gelo. Hartness, a member of the Governor's Commission on Indian Affairs, is an advocate and educator with many years of experience with FAS. Julie Gelo, a foster and adoptive parent, is co-trainer with the Foster Parent Institute. Over 375,000 newborn babies have been exposed to drugs in utero. The film promotes zero tolerance for alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and drugs for all pregnant women. The purpose of the video is to promote awareness of the problem among teenagers who are at risk for both unplanned pregnancy and substance use. This gripping film take a serious, no-holds-barred look at what happens when pregnant women use alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The film includes an examination of prenatal drug and alcohol abuse, fetal alcohol syndrome, nicotine's effect on unborn babies, risks for AIDS, SIDS and FAS, drug effects at various stages of pregnancy, how drugs affect unborn babies and other relation social and emotional problems. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and a spectrum of associated disorders, sometimes called Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), is a permanent birth defect caused by maternal consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. The term fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND) is applied to children whose mothers are known to have drunk heavily during pregnancy and who exhibit some, but not all, features of alcohol-related facial malformation. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation in the Western world and is entirely preventable. It has been estimated that one in 1000 children born suffers from FAS, and one in 100 suffers milder effects (FAE) of maternal prenatal alcohol exposure. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) is committed to developing and implementing innovative ideas in prevention, education, intervention, and advocacy in communities both nationally and internationally. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) provides information and research on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) including referral information across the United States with a national and state directory; Web resources with an extensive list of sites that discuss FASD; the latest events and activities with an up-to-date calendar of events; and information on addressing FASD through the NOFAS programs. A. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is the severe end of a spectrum of effects that can occur when a woman drinks during pregnancy. Fetal death is the most extreme outcome. FAS is a disorder characterized by abnormal facial features, and growth and central nervous system (CNS) problems. If a pregnant woman drinks alcohol but her child does not have all of the symptoms of FAS, it is possible that her child has an alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND). Children with ARND do not have full FAS, but may demonstrate learning and behavioral problems caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Children with FAS are at risk for psychiatric problems, criminal behavior, unemployment, and incomplete education. These secondary conditions are problems that an individual is not born with, but might acquire as a result of FAS. These conditions can be very serious, yet there are protective factors that have been found to help individuals with these problems. For example, a child who is diagnosed early in life can be placed in appropriate educational classes and given access to social services that can help the child and his or her family. Children with FAS who receive special education are more likely to achieve their developmental and educational potential. In addition, children with FAS need a loving, nurturing, and stable home life in order to avoid disruptions, transient lifestyles, or harmful relationships. Children with FAS who live in abusive or unstable households or become involved in youth violence are much more likely to develop secondary conditions than children with FAS who have not had such negative experiences.
Просмотров: 22844 rosaryfilms
The Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders FASD Basics
 
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This webinar is on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) Basics presented by Dr. Jeffrey Wozniak of the University of Minnesota.
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - Anti-Alcohol PSA Educational Video
 
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The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) provides information and research on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) including referral information across the United States with a national and state directory; Web resources with an extensive list of sites that discuss FASD; the latest events and activities with an up-to-date calendar of events; and information on addressing FASD through the NOFAS programs. NOFAS has both radio and TV PSA's available to help communities spread the FASD prevention message, including the award winning Infinite Power PSA. A new television Public Service Announcement cautioning women about the risk of drinking alcohol while pregnant produced by Women in Film's Los Angeles Chapter for the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) has won the 2005 Gold Aurora Award. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) is America's leading known preventable cause of mental retardation and birth defects. Even though FASD is completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol, as many as 32,000 infants are born with alcohol-related problems each year. NOFAS advises women who are pregnant or could be pregnant to abstain from alcohol. The PSA, entitled "Infinite Power" emphasizes the importance of a woman's role in the health of her baby and features multi-talented artist Gina Loring, best known as the top ranking poet from the 2002 National Poetry Slam, Russell Simmons' HBO Def Poetry Jam and BET's Lyric Cafe. The thirty second PSA includes powerful imagery and the lines, "You will call me mamma. Dependent on me; deciding your fate...Leaving the party behind with your interest in mind, I channel you healthy...Choose an alcohol-free pregnancy. The risks to your baby are many." The empowering PSA targets women of all cultures, ethnicities and backgrounds. It cautions women to abstain from alcohol use during pregnancy to avoid any risk of alcohol-related birth defects. The PSA was developed by Women In Film, Los Angeles as part of their award-winning Public Service Announcement Production Program and is both informative and appealing to a general audience. "I am so proud of everyone who has donated their time and talent in creating 'Infinite Power'," said Tobie Loomis, the director and co-writer of the PSA. The Aurora Awards is an international competition designed to recognize excellence in the film and video industries. It specifically targets programs and commercials that would not normally have the opportunity to compete on a national level, by focusing on non-national commercials, regional or special interest entertainment and corporate sponsored film and video. The Aurora Awards recognizes individuals in the film and video industries who have achieved the ability to captivate their audiences with the displays produced from their own creative forces. Women In Film was founded in Los Angeles by Tichi Wilkerson Kassel, the former Publisher and Editor--in-Chief of The Hollywood Reporter and a group of women who represented various disciplines within the film and television industries. WIF's purpose is to empower, promote, nurture, and mentor women in the industry through a network of valuable contacts, events, and programs including the Women In Film Mentor Program and the Public Service Announcement Production Program, among others. NOFAS President Tom Donaldson praised the achievement, saying, "The Women In Film PSA for NOFAS is an artistically stunning message about the risk of alcohol during pregnancy and deserves the utmost recognition. From a public health perspective, the PSA is an invaluable asset in the effort to educate the public about a largely unrecognized, significant health concern. We sincerely hope that our work with Women in Film will affect women's choices while they are pregnant. The critical next step is to ensure that the PSA is aired on all broadcast and cable networks and in television markets across the country." For further assistance, contact NOFAS at 1-800-66-NOFAS. Public service announcement public domain video.
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome & Fetal Alcohol Effects Video Part 3
 
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Fetal alcohol syndrome is among the most common known causes of mental retardation and as such, it is a major public health problem. Lecturer Dr. Ed Riley Department of Psychology San Diego State University Center for Behavior Teratology 6363 Alverado Court, Suite 209 San Diego, Ca 92120 Editor Dr. Carrie Randall Medical University of South Carolina Institute of Psychiatry Center for Drug & Alcohol Programs 171 Ashley Avenue Charleston, SC 29425-0742 Fetal alcohol syndrome is among the most common known causes of mental retardation and as such, it is a major public health problem. The purpose of this lecture is to provide a basic overview of what we know about the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. It is certainly not meant to be comprehensive but rather to give a broad overview of current knowledge in the area, and of ongoing human and animal research in the area. Heavy prenatal alcohol exposure can result in the fetal alcohol syndrome and both changes in brain structure and behavior have been reported in these children. Importantly, current data indicate that individuals exposed to heavy doses of alcohol in utero, but without the facial characteristics of FAS, can also suffer from similar brain and behavioral changes. Animal models have proven to be an excellent research tool in this field, as there appears to be good concordance between the animal and human data. The animal models provide a means to examine mechanisms of alcohol damage, to control for factors not possible in most human studies, and to help answer important clinical questions. Fetal alcohol effects are preventable, and every child born with a defect related to prenatal alcohol exposure indicates a failure of the health care system. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a devastating developmental disorder that affects children born to women who abuse alcohol during pregnancy. Although FAS is entirely preventable, and in spite of our increasing knowledge about the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure, children continue to be born exposed to high amounts of alcohol. It's consequences affect the individual, the family, and society. Its costs are tremendous, both personally and financially. Effective treatment and prevention strategies must be developed and made available. Fetal alcohol syndrome is among the most common known causes of mental retardation and as such, it is a major public health problem. The purpose of this lecture is to provide a basic overview of what we know about the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. It is certainly not meant to be comprehensive. For more a detailed overview, the references at the end of the presentation might be helpful. It is important to remember that as the mother consumes alcohol and her blood alcohol level rises, that alcohol is freely crossing the placenta and the embryo or fetus is being exposed to the same blood alcohol levels. This is a program ongoing in Seattle and which has been replicated in other communities. It began in 1991 to test the efficacy of an intensive, long term paraprofessional advocacy with high risk mothers who abused alcohol or drugs during pregnancy. Women became involved when they give birth to a child who was exposed to alcohol or drugs prenatally. They received intensive interaction with a case worker who acts as an advocate, getting them in touch with appropriate services. The results are impressive, with fewer subsequent children born exposed to alcohol or drugs, reduced foster care placement and a reduction in the dependence of welfare. Other positive outcomes are an increase in family planning and child well-being. References West, J.R., Chen, W-J. A., & Pantazis, N.J. (1994) Fetal alcohol syndrome: The vulnerability of the developing brain and possible mechanisms of damage. Metabolic Brain Disease, 9, 291-322. Ramanathan R; Wilkemeyer MF; Mittal B; Perides G; Charness ME. Alcohol inhibits cell-cell adhesion mediated by human L1. Journal of Cell Biology, 1996 Apr, 133(2):381-90. Klintsova AY. Cowell RM. Swain RA. Napper RM. Goodlett CR. Greenough WT. Therapeutic effects of complex motor training on motor performance deficits induced by neonatal binge-like alcohol exposure in rats. I. Behavioral results. Brain Research. 800(1):48-61, 1998 Grant, T.M., Ernst, C. C., and Streissguth, A.P. Intervention with high-risk alcohol and drug--abusing mothers: I. Administrative strategies of the Seattle model of paraprofessional advocacy. Journal of Community Psychology, 27, 1, 1-18, 1999 Ernst, C. C. Grant, T.M., Streissguth, A.P. and Sampson, P.D. Intervention with high-risk alcohol and drug--abusing mothers: II. Three-year finds from the Seattle model of paraprofessional advocacy. Journal of Community Psychology, 27, 1, 19-38, 1999 Public domain video.
Просмотров: 8880 rosaryfilms
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 02 / FAS FASD Educational Training Video
 
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The following training video on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is produced by the Washington State Department of Social Services and is part of the Foster Parent Webcast Archive. Carolyn Hartness and Julie Gelo are outstanding presenters. This thorough overview of FAS and FAE and intervention strategies should be required viewing for all who care for or treat children or adults with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Video courtesy of the Foster Parent Training Institute of the Division of Licensed Resources. "Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)" and "Fetal Alcohol Related Conditions" with Carolyn Harness and Julie Gelo. Hartness, a member of the Governor's Commission on Indian Affairs, is an advocate and educator with many years of experience with FAS. Julie Gelo, a foster and adoptive parent, is co-trainer with the Foster Parent Institute. Over 375,000 newborn babies have been exposed to drugs in utero. The film promotes zero tolerance for alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and drugs for all pregnant women. The purpose of the video is to promote awareness of the problem among teenagers who are at risk for both unplanned pregnancy and substance use. This gripping film take a serious, no-holds-barred look at what happens when pregnant women use alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The film includes an examination of prenatal drug and alcohol abuse, fetal alcohol syndrome, nicotine's effect on unborn babies, risks for AIDS, SIDS and FAS, drug effects at various stages of pregnancy, how drugs affect unborn babies and other relation social and emotional problems. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and a spectrum of associated disorders, sometimes called Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), is a permanent birth defect caused by maternal consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. The term fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND) is applied to children whose mothers are known to have drunk heavily during pregnancy and who exhibit some, but not all, features of alcohol-related facial malformation. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation in the Western world and is entirely preventable. It has been estimated that one in 1000 children born suffers from FAS, and one in 100 suffers milder effects (FAE) of maternal prenatal alcohol exposure. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) is committed to developing and implementing innovative ideas in prevention, education, intervention, and advocacy in communities both nationally and internationally. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) provides information and research on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) including referral information across the United States with a national and state directory; Web resources with an extensive list of sites that discuss FASD; the latest events and activities with an up-to-date calendar of events; and information on addressing FASD through the NOFAS programs. A. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is the severe end of a spectrum of effects that can occur when a woman drinks during pregnancy. Fetal death is the most extreme outcome. FAS is a disorder characterized by abnormal facial features, and growth and central nervous system (CNS) problems. If a pregnant woman drinks alcohol but her child does not have all of the symptoms of FAS, it is possible that her child has an alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND). Children with ARND do not have full FAS, but may demonstrate learning and behavioral problems caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Children with FAS are at risk for psychiatric problems, criminal behavior, unemployment, and incomplete education. These secondary conditions are problems that an individual is not born with, but might acquire as a result of FAS. These conditions can be very serious, yet there are protective factors that have been found to help individuals with these problems. For example, a child who is diagnosed early in life can be placed in appropriate educational classes and given access to social services that can help the child and his or her family. Children with FAS who receive special education are more likely to achieve their developmental and educational potential. In addition, children with FAS need a loving, nurturing, and stable home life in order to avoid disruptions, transient lifestyles, or harmful relationships. Children with FAS who live in abusive or unstable households or become involved in youth violence are much more likely to develop secondary conditions than children with FAS who have not had such negative experiences.
Просмотров: 4246 rosaryfilms
South Africa Focuses on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
 
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, which affects the babies of mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy, is considered by international health authorities as the most preventable cause of mental retardation and neurological damage. And in South Africa, with one of the highest rates of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in the world, civic groups and families are teaming up to prevent it and provide a better future for its victims. Correspondent Scott Bobb reports from Cape Town
Просмотров: 9384 VOA News
Drinking While Pregnant - Effects Of Alcohol On Unborn Babies | Fetal alcohol syndrome
 
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Drinking While Pregnant - Effects Of Alcohol On Unborn Babies | Fetal alcohol syndrome Fetal alcohol syndrome | Drinking While Pregnant - effects of alcohol on unborn babies if you do decide to drink while you're pregnant, limit it to one or two units of alcohol, no more than once or twice a week, and never enough to get drunk. Getting drunk by heavy or binge drinking during your pregnancy can cause serious harm to your baby. Subscribe Us - https://goo.gl/7t6FnQ Women who drink alcohol during pregnancy can give birth to babies with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, sometimes known as FASDs. FASD is the umbrella term for a range of disorders. These disorders can be mild or severe and can cause physical and mental birth defects.There is no known safe amount of alcohol to drink while pregnant. ... Evidence-based research has found that drinking even small amounts of alcohol while pregnant can increase the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, prematurity, or sudden infant death syndrome effects of alcohol, precautions during pregnancy
Просмотров: 360 Healthy Women
My talk to the Police about FASD on Mar 25 2015
 
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I was invited to speak to the Police on March 25th, about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder as part of the police initiative to find new and better ways to help people with Mental Illness when they are in crisis. Please like and share! Thanks, Andy
Просмотров: 879 Andy Hubbard
FASD and Mental Health
 
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Compromised mental health can affect almost 100% of those individuals who have been prenatally exposed to alcohol. It is important to medicate the symptoms otherwise the individual will not only have an organic brain injury but also an unmedicated and perhaps even an undiagnosed mental health condition. Feedback is welcome http://rffada.org
Просмотров: 1306 rffada
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Anti-Alcohol PSA Educational Video 2
 
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - A Public Service Announcement - PSA; Alcohol and Pregnancy Don't Mix PSA sponsored by NIAAA and NOFAS; public domain video. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) is committed to developing and implementing innovative ideas in prevention, education, intervention, and advocacy in communities both nationally and internationally. The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) provides information and research on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) including referral information across the United States with a national and state directory; Web resources with an extensive list of sites that discuss FASD; the latest events and activities with an up-to-date calendar of events; and information on addressing FASD through the NOFAS programs. A. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is the severe end of a spectrum of effects that can occur when a woman drinks during pregnancy. Fetal death is the most extreme outcome. FAS is a disorder characterized by abnormal facial features, and growth and central nervous system (CNS) problems. If a pregnant woman drinks alcohol but her child does not have all of the symptoms of FAS, it is possible that her child has an alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND). Children with ARND do not have full FAS, but may demonstrate learning and behavioral problems caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Children with FAS are at risk for psychiatric problems, criminal behavior, unemployment, and incomplete education. These secondary conditions are problems that an individual is not born with, but might acquire as a result of FAS. These conditions can be very serious, yet there are protective factors that have been found to help individuals with these problems. For example, a child who is diagnosed early in life can be placed in appropriate educational classes and given access to social services that can help the child and his or her family. Children with FAS who receive special education are more likely to achieve their developmental and educational potential. In addition, children with FAS need a loving, nurturing, and stable home life in order to avoid disruptions, transient lifestyles, or harmful relationships. Children with FAS who live in abusive or unstable households or become involved in youth violence are much more likely to develop secondary conditions than children with FAS who have not had such negative experiences. For further assistance, contact NOFAS at 1-800-66-NOFAS. Public service announcement public domain video.
Просмотров: 9942 rosaryfilms
The Shocking Effects Of Drinking Whilst Pregnant
 
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Hidden Harm: The devastating impact of Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder The UAE Women Imprisoned For Being Pregnant - Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1An4QKKZfeQ Bigorexia: How Big Is Too Big? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRCBlkuOL_w How Would You Cope With The Loss Of A Child? - Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_J7Jsd0H0Pw Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/?lid=69414 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures Around half of all women in Australia drink alcohol whilst pregnant, unaware of the permanent harm they are doing their babies. This report explores the lives of three families grappling with the consequences. "It was really hard trying to be like all the other kids, but I knew I was different." Claire is a vivacious 25-year-old, but she is carrying the effects of her mothers heavy drinking during pregnancy. She has brain damage and as a result faces a devastating range of problems, from behavioural issues to learning difficulties, collectively known as Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Whilst the condition has been widely recognised in the US and Canada for many years, in Australia it is largely unknown, despite experts predicting that as much as 5% of the population are affected. Experts warn that FASD is to blame for many other disorders, including depression, anxiety and suicidal tendencies. Until now however sufferers have not been diagnosed with mental illness, often leaving them vulnerable in society as they do not receive the support they so badly need. ABC Australia – Ref. 6632 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
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A journey of a Worrier to a Warrior | Colleen Lightbody | TEDxHyderabad
 
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Have you ever heard about fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)? Colleen takes us through a hard journey of her tryst with with this syndrome and how it changed her life forever, motivating her to do things differently. Hear Colleen unravel her story in her motivational talk on brain based learning systems and the puzzles of Neuro Leadership. This avid adventurer shows us how fulfilling and inspirational adventure can be and how she scaled almost every peak in the world and embraced life as it came her way. After experiencing most of life’s significant challenges, Colleen turned her life around 10 years ago and now walks a journey inspiring others through her personal and professional achievements as a motivational speaker. Colleen is the Managing Director of Neuroleadership Africa and is committed to social projects and transformation. She has climbed Mt Kilimanjaro, Everest Base Camp and completed many marathons, ultra marathons, Iron Man Triathlons and is a competitive cyclist. With her positive, energetic and passionate style, she lives her life purpose as a catalyst for change. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Просмотров: 64207 TEDx Talks
FASD and the Criminal Justice System: A Review for Forensic Professionals
 
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This 90-minute overview of the effects of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders on defendant behaviors in a variety of criminal justice contexts is presented by Jerrod Brown for Consolidated Continuing Education and Professional Training (CONCEPT) http://www.concept-ce.com
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
 
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome:The disorder alludes to a gathering of conditions that incorporate poor development for the infant both in the womb and after birth, and mental, physical and formative issues for the youngster that can last through adulthood, as per the U.S. National Institutes of Health
Просмотров: 1653 HowToHealth
Depression and anxiety in children with FASD
 
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It's a common problem for children with any disability to become depressed and anxious none more so than children with FASD. It is important to try and reduce the opportunity for them to acquire these mental health problems because they can lead to more problems later in life. Find out why it occurs and whether there is anything that can be done to avoid it.