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This Doctor Says if You're On This Medication, Stop Taking it Immediately!
 
06:59
Find out why Dr. Peter Glidden says this about two medications in this video. He also discusses the role of cholesterol and how current MDs are misguided in their thinking of cholesterol and cholesterol lowering drugs. Dr. Glidden also illustrates the danger of increased use of statin drugs and why certain conditions are also on the rise. http://www.ihealthtube.com
Просмотров: 588880 iHealthTube.com
My 'smart drugs' nightmare - BBC News
 
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So-called "smart drugs" are drugs that can supposedly enhance your cognitive abilities. People all over the world are taking them in universities, offices and the comfort of their own home - to get ahead of the game. One drug, Modafinil - is amongst the most popular. It was labelled in August 2015 as the world’s first “safe” smart drug - off the back of research from Harvard and Oxford University. But is this true? And do “smart drugs" actually work? In this film, our reporter Benjamin Zand tries a drug himself - as he takes a first-hand look inside the world of so-called smart drugs. Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews
Просмотров: 1832295 BBC News
15 Brain Enhancing Drugs That Are Perfectly legal.
 
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Support our videos by clicking LIKE! Thank you. Before you go trying to score smack downtown, keep in mind that there are some drugs out there are actually legal — and no, we’re not talking Ibuprofen. There exists in the world some fairly psychedelic, mind-bending drugs that’ll give your brain a vacation without landing you in jail or with a ludicrous fine. The Spirit Science has compiled a hefty list of them, with easy-to-understand effects. Today Breakin TOP's Presents to you 15 Brain Enhancing Drugs That Are Perfectly legal. Click here to suscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/MrBSTheGamer THANKS FOR WATCHING AND DON'T FORGET TO LIKE COMMENTS AND SUBSCRIBE!
Просмотров: 55362 Breakin TOP's
What Medications Treat Dementia?
 
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The doctors discuss the the medicines currently used to treat dementia. They discuss how the medications work in the brain and what can be expected.
Просмотров: 2249 dignityfirstdoctors
MEDICINES USED IN DEMENTIA
 
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RIVASTIGMINE GALANTAMINE DONEPEZIL MEMANTINE
Просмотров: 508 SomaliMedicine
Should my parent with late stage Alzheimer's Disease stop using Aricept?
 
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Join William A. Van Horn, MD for his daily Alzheimer's Disease prevention and treatment webcast from Protectyourbrain.com. If you would like Dr. Van Horn to answer your Alzheimer's Disease questions, please contact us with your questions via: TWITTER : http://www.twitter.com/alzheimerswar FACEBOOK : http://www.facebook.com/thealzheimersjourney EMAIL : contact@protectyourbrain.com TOLL FREE: 800-899-3302
Просмотров: 995 thealzheimersjourney
Dementia warning: Antidepressants 'can increase your risk of the incurable condition'
 
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Dementia warning: Antidepressants 'can increase your risk of the incurable condition': . Thanks for watching, subscribe for more videos. Long-term use of the medication has been linked with the incurable condition even when taken up to 20 years before a diagnosis.The health warning comes after the largest study of its kind into a family of drugs called anticholinergics, used to treat depression, bladder incontinence, Parkinson’s, hayfever and travel sickness.Analysis by British researchers found there was a greater incidence of dementia among patients prescribed greater quantities of anticholinergic antidepressants and anticholinergic medication for bladder conditions and Parkinson’s.Lead researcher Dr George Savva, from the University of East Anglia’s School of Health Sciences, said: “We studied patients with a new dementia diagnosis and looked at what anticholinergic medication they were prescribed between four and 20 years prior to being diagnosed. Related articles Dementia: Mediterranean diet could lower your risk Doing this could be a dementia early warning sign “We found people who had been diagnosed with dementia were up to 30 per cent more likely to have been prescribed specific classes of anticholinergic medications.“And the association with dementia increases with greater exposure to these types of medication. What we don’t know for sure is whether the medication is the cause.“It could be that these medications are being prescribed for very early symptoms indicating the onset of dementia.”Anticholinergics work by blocking a key neurotransmitter in the brain called acetylcholine. Related videos Ed Doolan on heartbreaking experience of living with dementia Using the medical records of more than 300,000 people aged over 65, including 40,770 with a dementia diagnosis between 2006 and 2015 and 283,933 without, scientists studied 27million prescriptions and found some anticholinergic drugs were linked to higher dementia risk, including frequently-prescribed antidepressants Amitriptyline, Dosulepin and Paroxetine.The risk was also associated with Tolterodine, Oxybutynin and Solifenacin, prescribed for bladder conditions, and Procyclidine for Parkinson’s.There was no evidence medications for hayfever, travel sickness or stomach cramps raise the risk of dementia.Dr Doug Brown, chief policy and research officer at Alzheimer’s Society, which funded the new study, said: “This large study confirms some anticholinergic drugs can raise the risk of dementia – but it should put minds at ease as there appears to be no risk with drugs used to treat common conditions like hayfever, travel sickness and stomach cramps.“Current guidelines for doctors say anticholinergic drugs should be avoided for frail older people because of their impact on memory and thinking, but doctors should consider these new findings for all over-65s as long-term use could raise the risk of dementia.”. One in five on antidepressants are prescribed anticholinergics – mostly Amitriptyline.The number of people who may be affected by deme
Просмотров: 21 Haidod nsowpd
A Pill That Makes People Learn New Skills as Fast as Children
 
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A clinical study by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital is testing a drug usually used to treat Alzheimer's, to see if it will help subjects learn new skills as quickly and easily as a young child. Results from the study show that the drug, called donepezil, has improved the eyesight of an adolescent girl, who is suffering from a serious vision disorder that can usually only be treated at a young age. A clinical study by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital is testing a drug usually used to treat Alzheimer's, to see if it will help subjects learn new skills as quickly and easily as a young child. According to her mother, the drug called donepezil, has improved the eyesight of an adolescent girl, who is suffering from a serious vision disorder that can usually only be treated at a young age. Another study by some of the same researchers gave 24 tone deaf subjects with no musical training a dose of either the epilepsy drug valproate, or a placebo. After being taught various notes, the group that took valproate could reportedly remember just over 5 musical notes compared to 3 point 5 in the placebo group. Takao Hensch, a professor of cellular biology from Harvard University who is also working with the Boston Children's Hospital trial is quoted as saying: "The brain is not losing its plasticity forever as we grow older. It's the brain's job to be elastic, and it wants to rewire. But through evolution, it's created a lot of molecules to make sure it doesn't rewire too much." Doctors hope that this kind of treatment will also prove to be effective for a variety of neurological diseases like stroke victims.
Просмотров: 9192 GeoBeats News
Alzheimer's trial takes new approach to tackle the disease
 
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(9 Oct 2018) LEADIN: Scientists in London are launching a new randomised trial for Alzheimer's patients which they say aims to tackle the disease differently. The trial, called DESPIAD (Depletion of Serum Amyloid P Component in Alzheimer's disease), aims to target a protein which can create conditions in the brain for the disease to thrive.   STORYLINE: Staffan Duhs is hoping he will be able to join a new Alzheimer's trial being launched in London. Duhs started to suffer memory loss several years ago, but he wasn't properly diagnosed with Alzheimer's until January this year (2018). Duhs admits it's is hard chasing a diagnosis for a disease which leads to brain degeneration and as yet, has no cure. He says: "Yes that of course a bit difficult yes, but I try to do as good as I can yes, in spite of the diagnosis and the illness and the sort of incapacity what you'd call it." Duh's, an intellectually high achiever, was tested for the disease by his general practitioner. The GP used the usual diagnostic cognitive tests, but Duhs scored one hundred percent. That didn't persuade his wife Rosalind who's been married to the Swedish ex-diplomat since their whirlwind romance in 1972. She says the deterioration in her husband's brain became to obvious to her in 2014 when they were managing the sale of their London home. "The first thing that happened was anxiety about what was going to happen, what we were going to do, when we were going to do it and perhaps less of an ability to remember those things," says Rosalind Duhs. Stefan Duhs is now on a drug called Donepezil, it temporarily treats the symptoms of Alzheimer's, but not the cause. Nobody knows what causes the death of brain cells which is responsible for the damage which leads to dementia. Much research has looked at amyloid which comes from a protein which forms abnormal fibres in the brain, often referred to as plaques. Doctors say there is strong evidence to link it to cardiovascular disease. Asked if he has changed his lifestyle since his first symptoms of Alzheimer's, Duhs say no, but then his wife gently reminds him: "Well I think what you do do, which is really admirable, is you swim nearly every day." "Yes I do that yes," says her husband. Laughing Rosalind Duhs persists: "And you do eat well and you've cut down on alcohol." "Yes we have done that too, yes that's part of the process," agrees Staffan. "And your general health absolutely astounding," says his wife adding "Your GP even said she wished she had that blood pressure herself." Duhs and his wife are hoping his good general health will stand him in good stead when it comes to fighting the disease. Duhs retired in 2006, but he hasn't allowed his mind to stop being active. Soon after he stopped work he took up a history course to further his academic achievements. "So that was very interesting and I read a lot of books and went on a lot of courses and sort of got an MA (Master of Arts degree) out of it in the end, yes." The couple are here at the National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery to see if he is able to pass the screening tests to get onto the DESPIAD trial being launched. They won't know if he's been accepted on the trial until after doctors have had a chance to scrutinise his PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scan. The drug is being tested is CPHPC, known by the brand name of Miridesap. It's currently used to treat patients who have a rare disease called amyloidosis. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/42bffb537a8523b8983a49e8b742c00c
Просмотров: 52 AP Archive
Birth defects: Did taking anti-depressants cause a birth defect in my child
 
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Birth defects: http://www.garymartinhays.com/personal-injury/serious-injury-and-wrongful-death/ In this video, lawyer Gary Martin Hays explains how anti-depressants could potentially cause a birth defect in your child. Personal Injury Lawyer Gary Martin Hays provides resources on the type of anti-depressants that are currently under investigation. To get free information on personal injury claims or talk with attorney Gary Martin Hays, click the link above. **Click below to SUBSCRIBE for more videos** http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=injurylawfirm Recap of Key points 1:38: Examples of birth defect studies 2:33 Serious birth defects have been connected to anti-depressants 4:08 Lists of drugs under investigation ============================================== Contact info Law Offices of Gary Martin Hays: http://www.garymartinhays.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LawOfficesofGaryMartinHays Google +: https://plus.google.com/b/115981143310145262766/+Garymartinhays-lawyers/about LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/law-offices-of-gary-martin-hays-&-associates-p-c- Instagram: https://instagram.com/garymartinhayslaw/ More... http://www.garymartinhays.com/posts/do-i-need-a-lawyer-question-about-anti-depressants-and-birth-defects-158/
ALZHEIMER'S DRUGS ARICEPT
 
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http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com ALZHEIMER'S ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com Although current medications cannot cure Alzheimer's or stop it from progressing, they may help lessen symptoms, such as memory loss and confusion, for a limited time. Types of drugs.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two types of medications — cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Exelon, Razadyne, Cognex) and memantine (Namenda) — to treat the cognitive symptoms (memory loss, confusion, and problems with thinking and reasoning) of Alzheimer's disease. As Alzheimer's progresses, brain cells die and connections among cells are lost, causing cognitive symptoms to worsen. While current medications cannot stop the damage Alzheimer's causes to brain cells, they may help lessen or stabilize symptoms for a limited time by affecting certain chemicals involved in carrying messages among the brain's nerve cells. Doctors sometimes prescribe both types of medications together. Some doctors also prescribe high doses of vitamin E for cognitive changes of Alzheimer's disease. All of the prescription medications currently approved to treat Alzheimer's symptoms in early to moderate stages are from a class of drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors. Cholinesterase inhibitors are prescribed to treat symptoms related to memory, thinking, language, judgment and other thought processes. Cholinesterase inhibitors: Prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine (a-SEA-til-KOH-lean), a chemical messenger important for learning and memory. This supports communication among nerve cells by keeping acetylcholine levels high. Delay worsening of symptoms for 6 to 12 months, on average, for about half the people who take them. Are generally well tolerated. Three cholinesterase inhibitors are commonly prescribed: Donepezil (Aricept) is approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's. Rivastigmine (Exelon) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. Galantamine (Razadyne) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. A second type of medication, memantine (Namenda) is approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's. Memantine is prescribed to improve memory, attention, reason, language and the ability to perform simple tasks. It can be used alone or with other Alzheimer's disease treatments. There is some evidence that individuals with moderate to severe Alzheimer's who are taking a cholinesterase inhibitor might benefit by also taking memantine. Donepezil (Aricept) is the only cholinesterase inhibitor approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's disease, including moderate to severe. Memantine: Regulates the activity of glutamate, a different messenger chemical involved in learning and memory. Delays worsening of symptoms for some people temporarily. Many experts consider its benefits similar to those of cholinesterase inhibitors. [alzheimer's memory enhancing drugs] [alzheimer's new drug developments] [alzheimer's new drug treatment] [alzheimer's new drug trials] [alzheimer's non drug treatments] [alzheimer's prescription drugs] [alzheimer's prevention drugs] [alzheimer's psychotropic drugs] [alzheimer's reversal drug] [alzheimer's sedative drugs] [alzheimer's skin cancer drugs] [alzheimer's smart drugs]
Просмотров: 1201 Anand Krish
ALZHEIMER DRUGS IN DEVELOPMENT
 
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http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com ALZHEIMER'S ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com Although current medications cannot cure Alzheimer's or stop it from progressing, they may help lessen symptoms, such as memory loss and confusion, for a limited time. Types of drugs.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two types of medications — cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Exelon, Razadyne, Cognex) and memantine (Namenda) — to treat the cognitive symptoms (memory loss, confusion, and problems with thinking and reasoning) of Alzheimer's disease. As Alzheimer's progresses, brain cells die and connections among cells are lost, causing cognitive symptoms to worsen. While current medications cannot stop the damage Alzheimer's causes to brain cells, they may help lessen or stabilize symptoms for a limited time by affecting certain chemicals involved in carrying messages among the brain's nerve cells. Doctors sometimes prescribe both types of medications together. Some doctors also prescribe high doses of vitamin E for cognitive changes of Alzheimer's disease. All of the prescription medications currently approved to treat Alzheimer's symptoms in early to moderate stages are from a class of drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors. Cholinesterase inhibitors are prescribed to treat symptoms related to memory, thinking, language, judgment and other thought processes. Cholinesterase inhibitors: Prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine (a-SEA-til-KOH-lean), a chemical messenger important for learning and memory. This supports communication among nerve cells by keeping acetylcholine levels high. Delay worsening of symptoms for 6 to 12 months, on average, for about half the people who take them. Are generally well tolerated. Three cholinesterase inhibitors are commonly prescribed: Donepezil (Aricept) is approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's. Rivastigmine (Exelon) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. Galantamine (Razadyne) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. A second type of medication, memantine (Namenda) is approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's. Memantine is prescribed to improve memory, attention, reason, language and the ability to perform simple tasks. It can be used alone or with other Alzheimer's disease treatments. There is some evidence that individuals with moderate to severe Alzheimer's who are taking a cholinesterase inhibitor might benefit by also taking memantine. Donepezil (Aricept) is the only cholinesterase inhibitor approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's disease, including moderate to severe. Memantine: Regulates the activity of glutamate, a different messenger chemical involved in learning and memory. Delays worsening of symptoms for some people temporarily. Many experts consider its benefits similar to those of cholinesterase inhibitors. [alzheimer drugs wikipedia] [alzheimer statin drugs] [alzheimer's antipsychotic drugs] [alzheimer's anxiety drugs] [alzheimer's calming drugs] [alzheimer's caused by drugs] [alzheimer's cholesterol lowering drugs] [alzheimer's cholinergic drugs] [alzheimer's disease common drugs] [alzheimer's disease drug of choice] [alzheimer's disease drugs list] [alzheimer's disease drugs market]
Просмотров: 99 Anand Krish
Celebrex Is the Drug for You!
 
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Jaime Wright and Marissa Gruesbeck
ALZHEIMER'S DRUGS APPROVED BY THE FDA
 
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http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com ALZHEIMER'S ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com Although current medications cannot cure Alzheimer's or stop it from progressing, they may help lessen symptoms, such as memory loss and confusion, for a limited time. Types of drugs.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two types of medications — cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Exelon, Razadyne, Cognex) and memantine (Namenda) — to treat the cognitive symptoms (memory loss, confusion, and problems with thinking and reasoning) of Alzheimer's disease. As Alzheimer's progresses, brain cells die and connections among cells are lost, causing cognitive symptoms to worsen. While current medications cannot stop the damage Alzheimer's causes to brain cells, they may help lessen or stabilize symptoms for a limited time by affecting certain chemicals involved in carrying messages among the brain's nerve cells. Doctors sometimes prescribe both types of medications together. Some doctors also prescribe high doses of vitamin E for cognitive changes of Alzheimer's disease. All of the prescription medications currently approved to treat Alzheimer's symptoms in early to moderate stages are from a class of drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors. Cholinesterase inhibitors are prescribed to treat symptoms related to memory, thinking, language, judgment and other thought processes. Cholinesterase inhibitors: Prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine (a-SEA-til-KOH-lean), a chemical messenger important for learning and memory. This supports communication among nerve cells by keeping acetylcholine levels high. Delay worsening of symptoms for 6 to 12 months, on average, for about half the people who take them. Are generally well tolerated. Three cholinesterase inhibitors are commonly prescribed: Donepezil (Aricept) is approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's. Rivastigmine (Exelon) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. Galantamine (Razadyne) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. A second type of medication, memantine (Namenda) is approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's. Memantine is prescribed to improve memory, attention, reason, language and the ability to perform simple tasks. It can be used alone or with other Alzheimer's disease treatments. There is some evidence that individuals with moderate to severe Alzheimer's who are taking a cholinesterase inhibitor might benefit by also taking memantine. Donepezil (Aricept) is the only cholinesterase inhibitor approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's disease, including moderate to severe. Memantine: Regulates the activity of glutamate, a different messenger chemical involved in learning and memory. Delays worsening of symptoms for some people temporarily. Many experts consider its benefits similar to those of cholinesterase inhibitors.
Просмотров: 163 Anand Krish
Dangerous Weight Loss Linked to Common Dementia Meds
 
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www.dailyrxnews.com It's probably not your imagination that Grandma is becoming increasingly fragile over time. And her dementia medication may be partly to blame. A new study from the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) found that a class medications commonly used to treat dementia — called cholinesterase inhibitors — may cause harmful weight loss in some patients. These medications include donepezil (brand name Aricept), galantamine (Razadyne) and rivastigmine (Exelon). "This is very relevant to patient care because unintentional weight loss in older adults is associated with many adverse outcomes, including increased rates of institutionalization and mortality, a decline in functional status, and poorer quality of life," said lead study author Meera Sheffrin, MD, a geriatrics fellow at UCSF School of Medicine, in a press release.
Просмотров: 308 dailyRx
Deceptive Drug Ads | TIME
 
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Drug-makers spend nearly $5 billion a year to make sure you're hearing about their products - but you might be surprised at how they're delivered Subscribe to TIME ►► http://po.st/SubscribeTIME Get closer to the world of entertainment and celebrity news as TIME gives you access and insight on the people who make what you watch, read and share. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2EFFA5DB900C633F Money helps you learn how to spend and invest your money. Find advice and guidance you can count on from how to negotiate, how to save and everything in between. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNKdqS_Wccs94rMHiajrRr4W Find out more about the latest developments in science and technology as TIME’s access brings you to the ideas and people changing our world. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNIzsgcwqhT6ctKOfHfyuaL3 Let TIME show you everything you need to know about drones, autonomous cars, smart devices and the latest inventions which are shaping industries and our way of living https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2862F811BE8F5623 Stay up to date on breaking news from around the world through TIME’s trusted reporting, insight and access https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNJeIsW3A2d5Bs22Wc3PHma6 CONNECT WITH TIME Web: http://time.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TIME Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/time Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TIME/videos Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/time/?hl=en Magazine: http://time.com/magazine/ Newsletter: time.com/newsletter ABOUT TIME TIME brings unparalleled insight, access and authority to the news. A 24/7 news publication with nearly a century of experience, TIME’s coverage shapes how we understand our world. Subscribe for daily news, interviews, science, technology, politics, health, entertainment, and business updates, as well as exclusive videos from TIME’s Person of the Year, TIME 100 and more created by TIME’s acclaimed writers, producers and editors. Deceptive Drug Ads | TIME https://www.youtube.com/user/TimeMagazine
Просмотров: 57435 TIME
Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus: What Your Doctors are Thinking Before and After the Shunt is Placed
 
01:22:37
Join Drs. Christopher Farrell and James Golomb for a discussion of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) diagnosis, management, and complications. Sponsored by Codman, a part of Integra Lifesciences
Просмотров: 1837 Hydrocephalus Association
Professor Tom Dening: How research is advancing dementia diagnosis
 
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In our third film about dementia research, Professor Tom Dening from the Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, talks about how NIHR supported research is leading to advances in the diagnosis of dementia.
Просмотров: 46 NIHRtv
A study of more than 600 older veterans with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease showed that high d
 
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FOR CLEAN VERSION SEE STORY NUMBER: apus003172 Vitamin E might slow the progression of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, researchers are reporting. It's the first time any treatment has been shown to alter the course of dementia at that stage. In a study of more than 600 older veterans, high doses of the vitamin delayed the decline in daily living skills, such as making meals, getting dressed and holding a conversation, by about six months over a two-year period. The benefit was equivalent to keeping one major skill that otherwise would have been lost, such as being able to bathe without help. For some people, that could mean living independently rather than needing a nursing home. Vitamin E did not preserve thinking abilities, though, and it did no good for patients who took it with another Alzheimer's medication. But those taking vitamin E alone required less help from caregivers _ about two fewer hours each day than some others in the study. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs sponsored the study, published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association. No one should rush out and buy vitamin E, several doctors warned. It failed to prevent healthy people from developing dementia or to help those with mild impairment ("pre-Alzheimer's") in other studies, and one suggested it might even be harmful. Still, many experts cheered the new results after so many recent flops of once-promising drugs. About 35 million people worldwide have dementia, and Alzheimer's is the most common type. In the U.S., about 5 million have Alzheimer's. There is no cure and current medicines just temporarily ease symptoms. Researchers don't know how vitamin E might help, but it is an antioxidant, like those found in red wine, grapes and some teas. Antioxidants help protect cells from damage that can contribute to other diseases, says the federal Office on Dietary Supplements. Many foods contain vitamin E, such as nuts, seeds, grains, leafy greens and vegetable oils. There are many forms, and the study tested a synthetic version of one _ alpha-tocopherol _ at a pharmaceutical grade and strength, 2,000 international units a day. Years ago, another study found that the same form and dose helped people with more advanced Alzheimer's, and many were prescribed it. But vitamin E fell out of favor after a 2005 analysis of many studies found that those taking more than 400 units a day were more likely to die of any cause. The new study involved 613 veterans, nearly all male, 79 years old on average, with mild to moderate Alzheimer's, at 14 VA centers. All were already taking Aricept, Razadyne or Exelon _ widely used, similar dementia medicines. Participants were placed in four groups and given either vitamin E, another dementia medicine called memantine (brand name Namenda), both pills or dummy pills. No one knew which treatment anyone was getting until the study ended. After a little more than two years of follow-up, those on vitamin E alone had a 19 percent lower annual rate of decline in daily living skills compared to the placebo group. Memantine made no difference, and vitamin E did not affect several tests of thinking skills. Heather Snyder, director of medical and scientific operations for the Alzheimer's Association, said the group's position is that "no one should take vitamin E for Alzheimer's disease or other memory issues except under the supervision of a physician," because it can interfere with blood thinners, cholesterol drugs and other medicines. The new results also need to be verified in a fresh study that includes more women and minorities, she said. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/c146c73b31e560922751f3f6ed82c910 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Просмотров: 87 AP Archive
A study of more than 600 older veterans with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease showed that high d
 
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Vitamin E might slow the progression of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, researchers are reporting. It's the first time any treatment has been shown to alter the course of dementia at that stage. In a study of more than 600 older veterans, high doses of the vitamin delayed the decline in daily living skills, such as making meals, getting dressed and holding a conversation, by about six months over a two-year period. The benefit was equivalent to keeping one major skill that otherwise would have been lost, such as being able to bathe without help. For some people, that could mean living independently rather than needing a nursing home. Vitamin E did not preserve thinking abilities, though, and it did no good for patients who took it with another Alzheimer's medication. But those taking vitamin E alone required less help from caregivers _ about two fewer hours each day than some others in the study. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs sponsored the study, published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association. No one should rush out and buy vitamin E, several doctors warned. It failed to prevent healthy people from developing dementia or to help those with mild impairment ("pre-Alzheimer's") in other studies, and one suggested it might even be harmful. Still, many experts cheered the new results after so many recent flops of once-promising drugs. About 35 million people worldwide have dementia, and Alzheimer's is the most common type. In the U.S., about 5 million have Alzheimer's. There is no cure and current medicines just temporarily ease symptoms. Researchers don't know how vitamin E might help, but it is an antioxidant, like those found in red wine, grapes and some teas. Antioxidants help protect cells from damage that can contribute to other diseases, says the federal Office on Dietary Supplements. Many foods contain vitamin E, such as nuts, seeds, grains, leafy greens and vegetable oils. There are many forms, and the study tested a synthetic version of one _ alpha-tocopherol _ at a pharmaceutical grade and strength, 2,000 international units a day. Years ago, another study found that the same form and dose helped people with more advanced Alzheimer's, and many were prescribed it. But vitamin E fell out of favor after a 2005 analysis of many studies found that those taking more than 400 units a day were more likely to die of any cause. The new study involved 613 veterans, nearly all male, 79 years old on average, with mild to moderate Alzheimer's, at 14 VA centers. All were already taking Aricept, Razadyne or Exelon _ widely used, similar dementia medicines. Participants were placed in four groups and given either vitamin E, another dementia medicine called memantine (brand name Namenda), both pills or dummy pills. No one knew which treatment anyone was getting until the study ended. After a little more than two years of follow-up, those on vitamin E alone had a 19 percent lower annual rate of decline in daily living skills compared to the placebo group. Memantine made no difference, and vitamin E did not affect several tests of thinking skills. Heather Snyder, director of medical and scientific operations for the Alzheimer's Association, said the group's position is that "no one should take vitamin E for Alzheimer's disease or other memory issues except under the supervision of a physician," because it can interfere with blood thinners, cholesterol drugs and other medicines. The new results also need to be verified in a fresh study that includes more women and minorities, she said. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/e7421c4cd69454c94f1350526adcc422 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Просмотров: 178 AP Archive
Does Coconut Oil Clog Arteries?
 
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Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free recipe from his new HOW NOT TO DIE COOKBOOK. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from the sales of his books, DVDs, and speaking engagements go to support the 501c3 nonprofit that runs NutritionFacts.org.) DESCRIPTION: Sellers of coconut oil use a beef industry tactic to downplay the risks associated with the saturated fat in their products. Here are the two saffron videos I referenced: Saffron for the Treatment of Alzheimer's (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/saffron-for-the-treatment-of-alzheimers/) and Saffron Versus Aricept (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/saffron-versus-aricept/). The spice may also help with PMS (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/saffron-for-the-treatment-of-pms/) and depression (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/saffron-vs-prozac/). Think my water in Coke joke was too over the top? When a corporate exec was asked on the stand (http://www.mcspotlight.org/case/trial/quotes.html) if Coca Cola was "nutritious" he said that it is "providing water, and I think that is part of a balanced diet." More on meat industry hijinks in videos like Meat Mythcrushers (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/meat-mythcrushers/), Cattlemen's Association Has Beef With Study (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/cattlemens-association-has-beef-with-epic-study/), Unsafe at Any Feed (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/unsafe-at-any-feed/), and my blog post E. coli O145 Ban Opposed by Meat Industry (http://nutritionfacts.org/2012/06/09/e-coli-o145-ban-opposed-by-meat-industry/). The "compared to butter" bit reminds me of the "compared to pork" nuttiness: Nuts and Bolts of Cholesterol Lowering (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/nuts-and-bolts-of-cholesterol-lowering/). What was that thing I said about saturated animal fat and endotoxins? See my three part series: The Leaky Gut Theory of Why Animal Products Cause Inflammation (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-leaky-gut-theory-of-why-animal-products-cause-inflammation/), The Exogenous Endotoxin Theory (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-exogenous-endotoxin-theory/), and Dead Meat Bacteria Endotoxemia (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/dead-meat-bacteria-endotoxemia/). Have a question for Dr. Greger about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-coconut-oil-clog-arteries/ and he'll try to answer it! http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast: http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Просмотров: 1037150 NutritionFacts.org
Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis - Or Not
 
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http://www.DialoguesWithCharles.com Alzheimer's disease or dementia? The physicians weren't very clear about it. They did prescribe medication for it, however. So, we added one more drug to the pile of drugs Millie was already taking. Visit me at http://www.DialoguesWithCharles.com
Просмотров: 61 DialoguesWithCharles
Know Where Your Legislator Stands on Medical Cannabis
 
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Medical cannabis is effective for treating a number of debilitating conditions. States with access to medical cannabis show a 25% drop in opioid overdose mortality rates. However, medical cannabis is not legal for virtually all Texans; approximately .005 percent of Texans could qualify for access under the current Texas law. Only one condition is served by the Texas Compassionate Use program, which also limits the plant’s therapeutic value and how specialists are allowed to prescribe to patients. You can find out more about the limited cannabis medical program in Texas here - https://www.informedtexas.org/compassionate-use-program/ Find out who your Texas State Senator and Texas State Representatives are here - http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us/Home.aspx Condition Resources: PTSD - Cannabis is associated with reductions in PTSD symptoms in some patients. Greater than 75% reduction in CAPS symptom scores were reported when patients were using cannabis compared to when they were not. - George R. Greer, Charles S. Grob, Adam L. Halberstadt. “PTSD Symptom Reports of Patients Evaluated for the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program”. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 2014; 46 (1): 73 Cancer - All cancer or anti-cancer treatment-related symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, mood disorders, fatigue, weight loss, anorexia, constipation, sexual function, sleep disorders, itching, and pain had significant improvement. The symptom score (symptomatic relief) was improved in 32.1%. - Bar-Sela, Vorobeichik, Drawsheh, Omer, Goldberg, and Muller. “The Medical Necessity for Medicinal Cannabis: Prospective, Observational Study Evaluating the Treatment in Cancer Patients on Supportive or Palliative Care”. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2013 Chronic Pain - This study suggests that many CP patients are essentially substituting medical cannabis for opioids and other medications for CP treatment, and finding the benefit and side effect profile of cannabis to be greater than these other classes of medications. - Boehnke, Litinas, and Clauw. “Medical Cannabis Use Is Associated With Decreased Opiate Medication Use in a Retrospective Cross-Sectional Survey of Patients With Chronic Pain”. Journal of Pain, 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease - This study demonstrated the THC molecule can directly impact Alzheimer's disease pathology. It is noteworthy that THC is a considerably more effective inhibitor of AChE-induced Aβ deposition than the approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease treatment, donepezil and tacrine, which reduced Aβ aggregation by only 22% and 7%, respectively, at twice the concentration used in our studies. Therefore, AChE inhibitors such as THC and its analogues may provide an improved therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease simultaneously treating both the symptoms and progression of Alzheimer's disease. - Eubanks, Rogers, Beuscher, Koob, Olson, Dickerson, and Janda. “A Molecular Link Between the Active Component of Marijuana and Alzheimer's Disease Pathology”. National Institute of Health, 2016 ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) - Preclinical models indicate that cannabinoids may hold the potential to delay ALS progression, lending support to anecdotal reports by some patients that cannabinoids may be efficacious in moderating the disease’s development and in alleviating certain ALS-related symptoms such as pain, appetite loss, spasticity, depression and drooling. - Amtmann et al. "Survey of cannabis use in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis". The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, 2006 Multiple Sclerosis - In this long-term follow-up of a clinical trial of a marijuana-based oral spray, patients were followed for as much as 82 weeks. The marijuana spray demonstrated long-term relief of spasticity, pain, and bladder issues related to MS, “without unacceptable adverse effects. - Wade, et al., “Long-Term Use of a Cannabis-Based Medicine in the Treatment of Spasticity and Other Symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis” Multiple Sclerosis, 2006 Visit Foundation for an Informed Texas for more information on conditions and resources- https://www.informedtexas.org/
Просмотров: 342 Foundation for an Informed Texas
Impaired Executive Function in TBI Patients
 
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Executive function is a varied set of cognitive processes that are necessary to maintain the cognitive control of behavior by choosing and successfully monitoring complex behaviors that facilitate the attainment of selected goals. Executive function is important to operate essential brain activities such as working memory, inhibitory control, attentional control, and cognitive flexibility. Did you know that executive function can be impaired in traumatic brain injury victims? In fact, traumatic brain injuries can affect executive function in a manner that can tremendously alter a victim's life. Although a victim of a traumatic brain injury may exhibit normal human functions after their accident, they could still be in danger of having their executive functioning capabilities completely inhibited. This could have a wide array of disastrous consequences. If you would like to know more about executive function and the role this function plays in traumatic brain injury victims, watch this video.
Просмотров: 30 James Bendell
Fish oil in troubled waters
 
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Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free recipe from his new HOW NOT TO DIE COOKBOOK. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from the sales of his books, DVDs, and speaking engagements go to support the 501c3 nonprofit that runs NutritionFacts.org.) DESCRIPTION: Major fish oil manufacturers and drug stores are being sued for failing to disclose the PCB pollutants in fish oil supplements. Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/fish-oil-in-troubled-waters/ and I'll try to answer it! Please feel free to post any ask-the-doctor type questions here in the comments section and I'd be happy to try to answer them. Be sure to check out the other videos on fish oil (http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/fish-oil/). Also, there are 1,449 subjects (http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/) covered in my other videos--please feel free to explore them! http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast: http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Просмотров: 13021 NutritionFacts.org
The Science of Alzheimer's: Where Are We Going? | Public Talk
 
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On September 22, 2015 the Forum hosted a public talk at McMaster Innovation Park featuring Jay Ingram, science broadcaster, writer and journalist; former co-host of the Daily Planet; and former host of CBC Radio’s Quirks & Quarks. Comments from the clinician's perspective were provided by Dr. Christopher Patterson, professor of geriatric medicine at McMaster University and staff physician of geriatric services at the Hamilton Health Sciences. The above video presents highlights from the event. This public talk was organized by the McMaster Health Forum in collaboration with the Alzheimer Society of Canada, Alzheimer’s Disease International, Alzheimer Society of Brant Haldimand Norfolk Hamilton Halton, and MedicAlert Foundation Canada and was supported by McMaster University’s Labarge Optimal Aging Initiative.
Просмотров: 2155 mcmasterhealthforum
David Smith, PharmD, Geriatric Pharmacology Part 3: Polypharmacy
 
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In this 3rd of 4 videos, Dr. Smith discusses management of a patient taking many medications. How to control or treat the side effects of medications which result in the addition of more medications. UC San Francisco advances health through education, research, patient care and public service. With seven major sites in the San Francisco Bay Area and Fresno, the UCSF School of Medicine is dedicated to improving human health by accelerating scientific discovery and transforming medical education. The school’s new Bridges curriculum is pioneering a new approach to medical education to prepare physicians for practice in the 21st century. Through mentorship and collaborative learning, students are trained to care for patients, conduct research and contribute vital knowledge to improve our health system. To see more videos in this series, click here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLP08XsLK51QyrMf-WBYudUE87Pd2iDpNc Main channel page: https://www.youtube.com/c/UCSFSchoolofMedicine Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCprcipiXNXTzJYJfN02rHsA?sub_confirmation=1
Просмотров: 4679 UCSF School of Medicine
Tip #8 5 Reasons to See a Geriatric Physician
 
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5 Great Reasons to See a Geriatric Physician A Geriatric Physician or Geriatrician is a doctor who specialize in senior health. They are trained in caring for the elderly and their knowledge can help keep your loved ones happy and healthy in their golden years. The baby boomer generation is entering their senior years and 1 in every 5 Americans will be over 65 and seniors. who will be over 85, are now the fastest growing segment of our population. A geriatric physician is a primary care doctor who has received special training in the health care needs of older people. Many seniors today have many special medical needs such as addressing the natural aging process, to managing multiple medical problems. Geriatricians have a greater understanding of these issues and better knowledge in how to treat the elderly. How a Geriatrician Can Benefit Your Loved One’s Health Since Geriatricians are trained to identify how illnesses in a senior is different from illness in a younger person, they know how to maintain the elderly in an independent living and social support system by using a more holistic approach that emphasizes healthy aging as well as preventive care Let’s look at how a geriatrician approaches some of the more serious senior health issues: • Frailty. Frailty is inevitable in the aging process. This may affect a person's ability to function independently from time to time. It may cause them to be more apt to fall and may need more supervision and assistance. A geriatrician may help anticipate problems and put a care plan in place. • Multiple medical problems. Many seniors have multiple medical conditions, such as arthritis, kidney and or heart disease, diabetes, as well as neurological conditions. A geriatrician is trained in how to treat these conditions and how they interact in seniors. • Multiple medications. Multiple medical conditions may require taking numerous prescription drugs. An older body breaks down medications differently than a younger one. Geriatricians know how to recognize side effects and drug interactions in seniors. NOTE: I personally don’t believe that medications should be the first line of defense. I prefer to find a more natural treatment for sickness and disease. • Mental decline. As we age, we may lose some cognitive ability, but there is a difference between normal aging and abnormal aging. A Geriatric physician is trained to know the difference. They can provide appropriate treatment for those conditions that are curable. Please NOTE: Medications such as Namenda and Aricept, Excelon Do not Work! • There are currently no treatments that will stop or reverse the progress of Alzheimer's disease. However, there are currently five FDA-approved medications available that may be able to relieve symptoms for patients for a limited time such as memory loss, for a limited time. For people with mild to moderate symptoms, doctors may prescribe Aricept®, Exelon®, or Razadyne®. Moderate to severe symptoms of Alzheimer's disease can be treated with Aricept®, Exelon®, Namenda® or Namzaric®. For more information on these products and to access prescribing information, please visit the manufacturers' websites. • Caregiving advice. Being a caregiver for someone with senior health issues can be confusing, stressful, and exhausting. Seniors who need help with daily tasks such as bathing, dressing, going to the bathroom, or eating may qualify for services via Medicaid. You need to check with your doctor for a diagnosis and with your state for available services. A geriatric physician may help you find the outside assistance and support from professionals, i.e., a care manager or a home health aide. Your Healthy-Aging Geriatric Team Seniors who have complicated health issues, may need the services a geriatric specialist who can provide and coordinate care. Multiple problems often require a team approach. A geriatric specialist's team may include: • A geriatric nurse • A social worker • Physical and occupational therapists • A registered dietitian or a certified diabetes educator • A pharmacist • A geriatric psychiatrist • Finding a Geriatrician How many board certified geriatricians and geropsychiatrists are there in the U.S.? There are 7,428 board certified geriatricians (7,063 in allopathic medicine and 365 in osteopathic medicine) and 1,629 (1,618 allopathic and 11 osteopathic) board certified geriatric psychiatrists in the U.S.i iAmerican Board of Medical Specialties. 2013-2014 ABMS Board Certification Report. Certification statistics reported through 2013-2014 by the ABMS Member Boards. Available at: http://www.abms.org/news-events/2013-2014-abms-board-certification-report-now-available/ and Scheinthal S, Gross C and Morales-Egizi, L. Appendix 2: AOA Specialty Board Certification. Certification statistics as of December 2014. The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. 2015;114 (4), 275-278.
Просмотров: 106 Connie Bohager
ALZHEIMER DRUGS MNEMONIC
 
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http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com ALZHEIMER'S ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION http://www.alzheimer-herbs.com Although current medications cannot cure Alzheimer's or stop it from progressing, they may help lessen symptoms, such as memory loss and confusion, for a limited time. Types of drugs.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two types of medications — cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Exelon, Razadyne, Cognex) and memantine (Namenda) — to treat the cognitive symptoms (memory loss, confusion, and problems with thinking and reasoning) of Alzheimer's disease. As Alzheimer's progresses, brain cells die and connections among cells are lost, causing cognitive symptoms to worsen. While current medications cannot stop the damage Alzheimer's causes to brain cells, they may help lessen or stabilize symptoms for a limited time by affecting certain chemicals involved in carrying messages among the brain's nerve cells. Doctors sometimes prescribe both types of medications together. Some doctors also prescribe high doses of vitamin E for cognitive changes of Alzheimer's disease. All of the prescription medications currently approved to treat Alzheimer's symptoms in early to moderate stages are from a class of drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors. Cholinesterase inhibitors are prescribed to treat symptoms related to memory, thinking, language, judgment and other thought processes. Cholinesterase inhibitors: Prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine (a-SEA-til-KOH-lean), a chemical messenger important for learning and memory. This supports communication among nerve cells by keeping acetylcholine levels high. Delay worsening of symptoms for 6 to 12 months, on average, for about half the people who take them. Are generally well tolerated. Three cholinesterase inhibitors are commonly prescribed: Donepezil (Aricept) is approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's. Rivastigmine (Exelon) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. Galantamine (Razadyne) is approved to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's. A second type of medication, memantine (Namenda) is approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's. Memantine is prescribed to improve memory, attention, reason, language and the ability to perform simple tasks. It can be used alone or with other Alzheimer's disease treatments. There is some evidence that individuals with moderate to severe Alzheimer's who are taking a cholinesterase inhibitor might benefit by also taking memantine. Donepezil (Aricept) is the only cholinesterase inhibitor approved to treat all stages of Alzheimer's disease, including moderate to severe. Memantine: Regulates the activity of glutamate, a different messenger chemical involved in learning and memory. Delays worsening of symptoms for some people temporarily. Many experts consider its benefits similar to those of cholinesterase inhibitors. [alzheimer's drug trials uk] [alzheimer's drug used for autism] [alzheimer's drugs cost] [alzheimer's drugs development] [alzheimer's drugs early stages] [alzheimer's drugs ebixa] [alzheimer's drugs efficacy] [alzheimer's drugs for autism] [alzheimer's drugs in canada] [alzheimer's drugs in clinical trials] [alzheimer's drugs in trial] [alzheimer's drugs lilly]
Просмотров: 1563 Anand Krish
Autophagy Cure? or Curse?
 
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Dr. Steven Phillips presents an innovative strategy to develop treatments for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, other neurodegenerative illnesses, aging and cancer. Autophagy is a cellular clearance mechanism whereby abnormal proteins can be cleared from the body. As such, it has potential therapeutic ramifications for the treatment of a range of disease states, inclusive of neurodegenerative illnesses which are hallmarked by the accumulation of such proteins, such as Alzheimer's Dementia, Parkinson's, Lewy Body Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and ALS. This mechanism will be examined from a number of aspects that are all on the same biologic axis, which include aging and cancer. Dr. Phillips, a past president of ILADS who practices in Wilton, CT, is a Yale trained physician specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease and co-infections. For additional information, visit LymeConnection.org.
How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose (Lower High Blood Sugar)
 
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Some tips and ways to bring your blood sugar level down if it is too high. Get my guide to learn ways you can bring blood sugar down - https://goo.gl/kLnFmD What can you do if your blood sugar gets really high? I mean you need to bring it down because you can really be in trouble. Extremely high blood sugar levels can be dangerous, and they can cause lasting health complications. Remember: if you ever have blood sugar readings that remain high for more than 24 hours without coming down (and after an effort has been made to lower them), you need to call your health care provider. That being said, we've all had those days when we get a random high blood sugar reading and we are not sure what caused it…or we forget to give insulin, or we eat a delicious dessert without realizing how much sugar is actually in it. For whatever reason, those out of the ordinary high blood sugar readings happen and need to be treated. No need to rush to the doctor for every high blood sugar reading though. There are some simple steps you can take to lower blood sugar fast. The following can help most people bring down their blood sugar to an acceptable level. However, if you have any questions about how to bring down your blood glucose, it is important to talk to your health care provider. They know your situation much better and can give you a plan to attack that high blood sugar. Watch for signs of high blood sugar You know the feeling: extreme thirst, sluggishness, nausea, blurred vision, a downright sick feeling. And your family or friends may tell you that extreme irritability is a major sign you need to check your blood sugar to see if it is high. The best thing to do is to catch it before it gets really high, or it will be harder to bring down quickly, causing havoc on your blood sugar readings for days. If you do not take insulin as a part of your treatment plan, these tips will show you how to lower your blood sugar fast. If you take insulin, you will first want to give the appropriate amount of insulin to correct the blood sugar. However, insulin still takes some time to take effect before bringing the blood sugar down. These tips will help you feel a bit better in the meantime. Insulin is the medication that will bring blood glucose down the fastest. Someone who uses mealtime insulin can take correction doses to lower blood glucose. This requires a thorough understanding of when to inject, how often to give correction doses, and how much insulin to use. You will need to work with your doctor or diabetes educator to learn how to do this. With that being said, here are 3 tips to lower your blood sugar fast Hydrate. The more water you drink, the better. Drink at least two glasses of water, one right after the other. Water helps flush out your system and stabilize the glucose in the bloodstream. According to David Spiro, an RN who is a contributor to WebMD, “For people with diabetes, the risk of dehydration is greater, because higher than normal blood glucose depletes fluids. To get rid of the glucose, the kidneys will try to pass it out in the urine, but that takes water. So the higher your blood glucose, the more fluids you should drink, which is why thirst is one of the main symptoms of diabetes.” Exercise. Exercise is a good way to get better blood sugar control and keep your blood sugar levels in a healthy range as a part of your routine diabetes management. But exercise can also help lower blood sugar when it is excessively high by getting your heart pumping and the blood flowing, which uses up the glucose in your bloodstream faster. It will also get your endorphins going, which will help your body start to feel better, too. Try to keep your heart rate up for at least 10 to 15 minutes. Check your blood sugar intermittently to prevent it from rebounding too low in your attempt to stabilize it. (Note: If your blood sugars have been so high that you have high ketones in your blood—a condition called DKA or diabetic ketoacidosis—do not exercise as it may drive your blood sugar even higher.) Eat a protein-packed snack. Protein acts as a blood sugar stabilizer and can slow the absorption rate of glucose. One of the symptoms of high blood sugar is increased hunger, so this can help satisfy that craving while helping lower the blood sugar at the same time. Don't grab a snack that has a lot of sugar along with the protein, or you will be defeating the purpose of it. Good sources of protein include a tablespoon of no-sugar-added peanut butter or an ounce of cheese. But don’t overdo it. The most important thing you can do for your health and your diabetes is to pay close attention to how you feel. Whenever you feel like something is out of whack, it probably is—so test your blood sugar and do something about it. In the long run, it is easier to do your best to keep your blood sugars tightly controlled than to live with the consequences of not doing so.
Просмотров: 255038 Beat Your Diabetes
Huntington's Disease: Stages and Therapies
 
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Huntington's disease is a rare genetic disorder that causes programmed degeneration of brain cells, called neurons, in certain areas of the brain. This talk explores the diagnosis, stages of the disease, and its treatment. The Stanford Huntington's Disease and Ataxia Clinic has been named a Center of Excellence by the Huntington's Disease Society of America. This talk reflects the treatment standards offered at Stanford. Speaker: Veronica Santini, MD Clinical Instructor, Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University Medical Center
Просмотров: 13769 Stanford Health Care
alzheimer's
 
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lzheimer's is a disease that causes dementia, or loss of brain function. It affects the parts of the brain that are important for memory, thought, and language. The brain of a person with Alzheimer's contains abnormal clumps of cellular debris and protein (plaques) and collapsed microtubules (support structures inside the cell). Microtubule collapse is caused by a malfunctioning protein called tau, which normally stabalizes the microtubules. In Alzheimer's patients, tau proteins instead cluster together to form disabling plaques and tangles. These plaques and tangles damage the healthy cells around them, leading to cell death. The brain also produces smaller amounts of neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, serotonin, and norepinephrine), chemicals that allow nerve cells to talk to one another.The most common form of the disease, which strikes after age 65, is linked to the apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene on chromosome 19. Scientists don't know how apoE4 increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's. They do know that everyone has apoE, which comes in three forms. One of the forms (apoE4) increases a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's. The other two forms seem to protect against the disease. While people who inherit the apoE4 form of the gene are at increased risk for the disease, they will not necessarily develop it. Mutations in genes found on chromosomes 1, 14, and 21 are linked to rarer forms of the disease, which strike earlier in life.There is no cure for Alzheimer's, but a few medicines can slow its symptoms. A drug called Aricept increases the amount of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brain. Another medicine, Namenda, protects brain cells from a chemical called glutamate, which can damage nerve cells. Doctors may also give their Alzheimer's patients antidepressants or anti-anxiety medicines to ease some of their symptoms. People with Alzheimer's often need a caregiver—someone to help them do the things they were once able to do themselves.
Просмотров: 36 mahrukh Iqbal
Keep Memory Alive - Dangerous Medicines
 
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Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health provides state-of-the-art care for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and related conditions. The center provides "patients first" care, support for caregivers and family members, and clinical trials to advance new therapies for neurological disorders. The Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health offers a multidisciplinary patient-focused approach to diagnosis and treatment, offering patients a complete continuum of care and infusing education and research into all that it does. The facility, designed by Frank Gehry, houses a diagnostic and care center, MRI and PET scans, physical therapy, clinical trials suite, and the Keep Memory Alive Event Center. www.clevelandclinic.org/brainhealth Over the course of a disease, patients and families strive to find a sense of balance and maintain their quality of life. To help, we offer education programs and social services designed to increase knowledge, coping skills and a sense of well-being. A full calendar of no-cost social services programming is online at www.keepmemoryalive.org/socialservices We are located in Las Vegas, Nevada. Please contact us: For information on our free social services: 702.483.6055 or LouRuvoSocialServ@ccf.org. To make a medical appointment: 702.483.6000 To participate in a clinical trial: 855.LOU.RUVO (855.568.7886) or brainhealth@ccf.org To make a donation: 702.263.9797
Просмотров: 47 Keep Memory Alive - Lunch & Learn
Speaking Of Health: ABCs of Alzheimer's Disease
 
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Просмотров: 861 QMCHawaii
Episode 50: After the Death of Her Mother & Husband, She Used Cannabis to Clear Her Breast Cancer
 
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Both her mother and husband died from cancer, but when she was diagnosed with breast cancer, Geri Klughart of British Columbia, Canada was determined to use cannabis oil to treat her cancer even though doctors said she had a “death wish” for not undergoing conventional treatment. She tells us about the tragedy of cancer in her family and her fight to take her health into her own hands. Use next link to contribute to this subtitle www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=Ukz4Tlo3LpY
Просмотров: 1119 Cannabis Health Radio
Healthy Living for Life - Who is on Your Pharmacy Team (Full Version)
 
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When it comes to making sure you understand your medications, you may be surprised to learn the most important member of your pharmacy team is you! In this episode, learn about medication reconciliation, how to avoid dangerous medication combos, and if you have ever wondered what questions you should be asking your pharmacist, we give you a whole list! Healthy Living for Life is a weekly series sponsored, produced and hosted by Mountain-Pacific Quality Health. Healthy Living for Life offers a line-up of guests who will cover some tough topics like taking the keys from an aging parent, caregiver burnout and making end-of-life decisions. We’ll also have experts who can offer tips for staying safe in the hospital and getting the most out of visits with your doctor. Visit www.hlf.life for more information. Air times in Montana are 8:00 AM on Sunday mornings on KTMF, KFBB, KWYB and KHBB and 6:30 AM on KULR8. Air times for SWX (cable television) are Saturdays at 9:30 AM. Check us out on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/mpqhf/.
Просмотров: 45 Mountain-Pacific Quality Health
Braided updo hairstyle for BACK TO SCHOOL, everyday, party, medium/long hair tutorial
 
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Here comes a Holiday hair tutorial on a very soft and feminine curly updo with a side braid, great for medium length and long hair. It works best on curly hair (at least wavy hair, just not straight!) and once your hair is curled, it's really quick and easy to recreate. It's a perfect hairstyle for Christmas and New Year's eve as well as wedding, prom, ball, graduation, etc. Show me your results on Instagram with @LilithMoonLife #LilithMoonHair ❤ Get my bendy rollers Jumbo Curlers on http://www.JumboCurlers.com and have fun with all sorts of curly updos! I talk about them in detail in the video linked below: Linked videos: ✿ Heatless curls tutorial http://youtu.be/LQk-3h0uwyw ✿ Braided high ponytail http://youtu.be/a6HcWW6twRw ✿ High curly updo http://youtu.be/SJ9FiLG2hio Follow me on ★ Instagram http://instagram.com/LilithMoonLife ★ Fаcebook http://www.facebook.com/LilithMoon ★ Twitter http://www.twitter.com/LiliTheDarkMoon ★ Pinterest http://www.Pinterest.com/LilithMoon ★ Blog http://www.lilithmoon.com ★ ВКонтакте http://vk.com/LilithMoon ❤ my beauty channel in French http://www.YouTube.com/LilithMoonFr ❤ my beauty channel in Russian http://www.YouTube.com/LilithMoonRu Feel free to check out ✔ My hair story http://www.lilithmoon.com/2013/06/my-hair-story.html ✔ All about my hair http://www.lilithmoon.com/2011/09/in-this-post-ill-try-to-answer-all.html
Просмотров: 5133767 Lilith Moon
Dementia Behaviour: A Management Challenge
 
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Dementia represents an increasing challenge for health care in Australia and an expected deficit in the dementia care workforce necessitates the need for training and more skilled management. There are now nearly 300,000 people in Australia living with dementia. By the year 2050 there will be almost one million. Current trends indicate about 1600 new cases of dementia each week. One in four people over the age of 85 now have dementia. Dementia is a broad term used to describe a group of conditions or symptoms that cause a progressive decline in a person's functioning, including memory loss and cognitive impairment. It is usually accompanied by changes in normal emotional reactions, as well as psychological and behavioural changes, such as depression, wandering, anxiety, hallucinations, aggression and disinhibition. This progressive decline presents particular problems for family and carers as well as primary health care professionals and the staff of aged care or specialist residential units. Managing dementia in any setting can be challenging and frustrating and usually requires well designed decision pathways and management strategies. In non-specialist settings delirium can often be confused with dementia and pharmacological treatment can present problems. This program takes a practical skills based approach to the challenge of dementia behaviour in various settings. It examines best practice strategies and principles for a range of behavioural and psychological dementia symptoms. It examines the issues for people in rural and remote Australia. Produced by the Rural Health Education Foundation http://www.rhef.com.au/
Просмотров: 1389 Rural Health Channel
Part 2 - Healthy Living for Life - Who is on Your Pharmacy Team
 
07:17
When it comes to making sure you understand your medications, you may be surprised to learn the most important member of your pharmacy team is you! In this episode, learn about medication reconciliation, how to avoid dangerous medication combos, and if you have ever wondered what questions you should be asking your pharmacist, we give you a whole list! Healthy Living for Life is a weekly series sponsored, produced and hosted by Mountain-Pacific Quality Health. Healthy Living for Life offers a line-up of guests who will cover some tough topics like taking the keys from an aging parent, caregiver burnout and making end-of-life decisions. We’ll also have experts who can offer tips for staying safe in the hospital and getting the most out of visits with your doctor. Visit www.hlf.life for more information. Air times in Montana are 8:00 AM on Sunday mornings on KTMF, KFBB, KWYB and KHBB and 6:30 AM on KULR8. Air times for SWX (cable television) are Saturdays at 9:30 AM. Check us out on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/mpqhf/.
Просмотров: 10 Mountain-Pacific Quality Health
The Memory Class - An Introduction to Memory Problems and the Memory Center
 
54:27
The Memory Class is provided by the Neurology department at Kaiser Permanente's Martinez Medical Offices. The video is an introduction to memory problems, memory loss, and the memory center located at the Kaiser Permanente Martinez facility.
Просмотров: 367 MyKPDiablo
Basics of Alzheimer's & Dementia for LGBT Care Partners
 
50:13
An overview of dementia, and LGBT caregiving concerns.
Alzheimer's disease
 
53:17
Alzheimer's disease (AD), also known in medical literature as Alzheimer disease, is the most common form of dementia. There is no cure for the disease, which worsens as it progresses, and eventually leads to death. It was first described by German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer in 1906 and was named after him. Most often, AD is diagnosed in people over 65 years of age, although the less-prevalent early-onset Alzheimer's can occur much earlier. In 2006, there were 26.6 million people worldwide with AD. Alzheimer's is predicted to affect 1 in 85 people globally by 2050. Although Alzheimer's disease develops differently for every individual, there are many common symptoms. Early symptoms are often mistakenly thought to be 'age-related' concerns, or manifestations of stress. In the early stages, the most common symptom is difficulty in remembering recent events, known as short term memory loss. When AD is suspected, the diagnosis is usually confirmed with tests that evaluate behaviour and thinking abilities, often followed by a brain scan if available, however, examination of brain tissue is required for a definitive diagnosis. As the disease advances, symptoms can include confusion, irritability, aggression, mood swings, trouble with language, and long-term memory loss. As the person's condition declines they often withdraw from family and society. Gradually, bodily functions are lost, ultimately leading to death. Since the disease is different for each individual, predicting how it will affect the person is difficult. AD develops for an unknown and variable amount of time before becoming fully apparent, and it can progress undiagnosed for years. On average, the life expectancy following diagnosis is approximately seven years. Fewer than 3% of individuals live more than 14 years after diagnosis. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Просмотров: 370 Audiopedia
GA M4pt1v2
 
01:04:06
Просмотров: 21 Cc Lmscourse
Alzheimer's in Wyoming
 
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With over 9,000 with dementia in Wyoming, plus 28,000 caregivers, dementia and Alzheimer's effects over 6% of our state's population. In this one-hour Wyoming Chronicle Live, we'll provide the most up-to-date information on dementia and Alzheimer's. We discuss current research, support options, and current work on a Wyoming State Alzheimer's plan.
Просмотров: 51 Wyoming PBS
What is the cause of decreased kidney function ?
 
00:44
Acute kidney failure symptoms, diagnosis, treatment of acute feline disease. The causes of decreased kidney function fall into two categories, acute and chronic find out what disease (ckd) is, including the symptoms are, how it's diagnosed it can be treated many americans know nothing about until too late. Kidney disease causes, signs, diagnosis and treatment chronic kidney symptoms, treatments. Kidney disease causes, symptoms, treatment chronic kidney failure wikipedia. Symptoms and causes chronic kidney disease mayo clinic. Bones, calcium, phosphate, and pth in kidney failure national chronic disease symptoms treatment live science. Kidney problems aging & health a to z in. Reduced kidney function causes search for info & results now failure signs, symptoms, stages medicinenet kidney_failure article. Kidney disease (nephropathy) american diabetes association. How arthritis affects the body kidney failure guide causes, symptoms and treatment options. Anemia of chronic disease and renal failure overview kidneys age related problems better health channel. 10 signs you have kidney disease e kidney. Kidney disease info life options. Htm url? Q webcache. Lifelong efforts to control blood pressure and diabetes be the best way prevent chronic kidney disease its progression failure. Reduced kidney function causes search for info & results now. When the older people are more at risk of some kidney and urinary tract diseases. Kidney disease causes and basic information webmd. Unlike many diseases, kidney disease often has no symptoms until it is very advanced,' there are, however, some signs that indicate reduced function and it's these are general be caused by other illnesses most people do not have of decreased the gfr 20 30 or less, don't feel sick as low 10 15 23 several important dietary rules one can follow to help slow progression decrease likelihood levels azotaemia produce few, if any. 15 symptoms of kidney disease. Treatment of the underlying cause kidney failure return function to normal. Kidney failure multiple myeloma research foundation. Kidney disease early detection and treatment medlineplus. Symptoms of lupus research alliance lupusresearch. This can cause people to feel tired, weak and make it hard concentrate. This is the most common cause of kidney failure in elderly doses medications must also be reduced if function has declined, since nephrotic syndrome causes your kidneys to excrete too much protein into 5 acute tubular necrosis (atn)blood clot from cholesterol (cholesterol emboli); Decreased blood flow due very cat symptoms ckd, veterinarian recommend some or all ckd decrease a cat's ability produce red cells, which can. In high blood pressure and reduced kidney function. What causes low kidney function results 7 days a week. A powerful immunosuppressant, cyclosporine decrease kidney function acute renal failure stops or is abruptly reduced because of a sudden illness, medication, toxin medical condition that causes one another common symptom multiple myeloma results in several different symptoms which include increased decreased disease (renal disease) dogs and cats cause higher than normal levels, it sign impaired the kidneys 29 anemiadark urine; Decreased mental alertness malaria yellow fever known to 9 how does diabetes disease? low protein diet can loss urine increase levels 19 anemia chronic illness (ckd) both fall under category rbc production. Mild to moderate chronic kidney disease patient uk. Kidney failure signs, symptoms, causes & stages medicinenet. Anemia in chronic kidney disease what is disease? Beaumont hospital. Look out for these symptoms most common questions kidney patients ask doctors davita. Another complication of kidney disease is anemia, which can cause weakness and fatigue how common chronic (ckd)? ; What causes stage 2 mildly reduced function you are already known to have when know the symptoms (ckd), get treatment feel your best note low back pain not a sign 9 learn about failure symptoms, tests, changes in much urinate; Decreased mental sharpness 17 this type usually be cured once doctor determine decreased blood flow 14 medical condition. As we age kidney function gradually decreases over time 13 learn about the causes and symptoms of disease from experts at webmd a severe decrease in can lead to buildup toxins impurities blood. Kidney failure accompanied by noticeable symptoms is other common causes of anemia in people with kidney disease include blood loss from hemodialysis and low levels the following nutrients found food decreased flow to this occur when there extremely however, if cause acute persists, can be high phosphate causes, effects treatment you are not someone failure, on dialysis, or a transplant 9 over time, health complications develop as result function, including pressure, (decreased but some problems already have reduced function. Googleusercontent search.
Просмотров: 663 BEST HEALTH Answers
Teaching Project: Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease
 
13:52
Presented by: Ran Kang, Vu Nguyen, Eleanor Ohakamma, Nathaly Guzman, Sandy Tran Closed captioning's available.
Просмотров: 35 Sandy Tran
Save the Family | 가족을 지켜라 EP.93 [SUB : ENG,CHN / 2015.09.30]
 
34:26
Click the "Caption" button to activate subtitle! ------------------------------------------------ Ep.93: Yunchan meets with Mina and Donbaek, and the three of them have a great time together. Huijin begins to suspect something is wrong when Yunchan doesn’t answer his phone. Suja goes to see Yewon’s mother. There, she chances upon Seonyeong. Thus, the fateful encounter between the three woman unfolds. 允灿见到米娜和冬柏,度过了愉快的时光。 喜珍因联系不上允灿而开始怀疑他。 同时,秀子去找艺媛妈妈 却偶然遇到了善英, 三人犹如命中注定般见了面…… ------------------------------------------------ Subscribe KBS World Official YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/kbsworld ------------------------------------------------ KBS World is a TV channel for international audiences provided by KBS, the flagship public service broadcaster in Korea. Enjoy Korea's latest and most popular K-Drama, K-Pop, K-Entertainment & K-Documentary with multilingual subtitles, by subscribing KBS World official YouTube. ------------------------------------------------ 대한민국 대표 해외채널 KBS World를 유튜브에서 만나세요. KBS World는 전세계 시청자에게 재미있고 유익한 한류 콘텐츠를 영어 자막과 함께 제공하는 No.1 한류 채널입니다. KBS World 유튜브 채널을 구독하고 최신 드라마, K-Pop, 예능, 다큐멘터리 정보를 받아보세요. ------------------------------------------------ [Visit KBS World Official Pages] Homepage: http://www.kbsworld.co.kr Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/kbsworld Twitter: http://twitter.com/kbsworldtv Google+: http://plus.google.com/+kbsworldtv KakaoTalk: @kbs_world (http://plus.kakao.com/friend/@kbs_world) Instagram: @kbsworldtv Tumblr: http://kbsworld.tumblr.com
Просмотров: 70885 KBS World TV
Telemedicine and Parkinson disease: Improving Care and Clinical Research
 
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Google Tech Talk March 22, 2010 ABSTRACT Presented by Kevin Biglan, MD, MPH and Ray Dorsey, MD, MBA, University of Rochester. The cost of clinical trials is rising, recruiting participants is increasingly difficulty, and monitoring safety is increasingly important. Home and patient appropriate technologies like the Marvell Plug computer and Google products can help address all of these issues. We will discuss our efforts to monitor blood pressure remotely using these technologies in a Michael J. Fox funded Parkinson disease clinical trial. Telemedicine using simple web-based video conferencing using, for example, the Marvell Plug computer and Google's services can also address large unmet needs in clinical care. Chronic conditions account for 75% of health care expenditures and affect over 140 million Americans. However, many have limited access to physicians, especially specialists, who can improve their care. We will present results of a pilot, randomized controlled trial of increasing specialty access using telemedicine to individuals with Parkinson disease residing in a remote nursing home and remote communities. We discuss future directions, including providing care directly into people's homes ('virtual house calls'), and ways that Google's services can provide additional value. A new variation of the Marvell Plug computer in planned as an interactive television server for the virtual house calls in a upcoming study.
Просмотров: 7451 GoogleTechTalks