На главную
Видео добавленное пользователем “SkillCult”
How to Make Authentic Fermented Hot Sauce, The Real Deal!
 
04:45
Plastic Mason Jar Lids: If you ferment in jars regularly, these are great because the salt and fermentation acids will destroy all your jar rings. They can be hard to find locally. Here is my Amazon link to them if you use it I'll make a few cents, thanks. http://amzn.to/1QsMBbz This is how I've made hot sauce every year for over ten years. This is an awesome thing to do with hot peppers. It keeps for years and it's delicious! It is also super easy and no special equipment required! The peppers are fermented in a simple brine and then blended with brine and vinegar in a blender. Just try it! Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 58578 SkillCult
PRIMITIVE FIRE SCIENCE!  Burning Shells Into Lime In a Grass Straw & Clay Furnace
 
06:54
In this short video, I build a kiln from about half straw and half clay and use wood to burn shells (calcium Carbonate) into quicklime (Calcium Oxide), then slake that with water into Calcium Hydroxide. There is a longer how to version of this video here: https://youtu.be/jOxaOTUGuKo Support my channel by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me!: http://amzn.to/296alqr Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Check me out on Instagram and Facebook as SkillCult and on Flickr as Steven Edholm. Lime is one of the most useful substances ever! It is used in smelting and refining, processing foods like sugar and tortillas, for mortar and plasters, it is the main ingredient in cement. it can be mixed with milk protein for milk paints and cheese glue, it is used in preparing skins for tanning and much more. Lime is not only easy to make from limestone or shells, it's hella fun! If you want to know all about lime and it's uses in building, read the definitive book, Building With Lime by Holmes and Wingate.http://amzn.to/1ZHXaMa Shells or limestone are burned at about 900 Celsius driving off the carbon leaving quicklime (calcium oxide). Water is added to the calcium oxide to slake the lime. It creates lots of heat reacting with the water and changes into calcium hydroxide. Calcium hydroxide will keep indefinitely if stored under a layer of water as "lime putty" and actually improves with age. Once exposed to the air and allowed to dry, the calcium hydroxide turns back into calcium carbonate, which is what we started with, thus completing the lime cycle. The kiln here is invented by me and based on Michael Smith, Author of The Cobbers Companion's, straw and clay wattle system, which was in turn inspired by a traditional style of clay/straw granary from Mexico. This Kiln is called a PET and is just bundles of straw dipped in clay and laid in coils like a coiled pot. The Furnace has some insulation properties from the hollow grass stems, but also some mass from the clay slip, so it gets hot and stays hot. This can also be done in a metal drum. Shells or limestone are layered in the kiln with pieces of wood and fired with a free flow of oxygen through the vents in the bottom. It burns naturally at around 900 Celsius or 1650 degrees farenheit. Carbon is driven off the shells or stone leaving calcium Oxide or quicklime. The shells are sorted to discard those that are underburned. Quicklime is very dangerous and highly unstable. When warm water is added, it boils violently as it takes on water to become slaked lime putty, or Calcium Hydroxide. This Lime Putty can be stored under water and will not only keep, but it will improve with age. Masons used to make it and store it for use years later. When the kiln is burned out, all the ashes, pieces of burned clay from the kiln, bits of charcoal and pieces of burned shell are crushed and added to the garden soil. For More on lime, visit my website SkillCult.
Просмотров: 43075 SkillCult
How I Grow The Worlds Most Expensive Spice at Home, Saffron Crocus, More Than Gold
 
04:10
How to grow Saffron, the most expensive spice in the world. Planting Saffron Corms (bulbs), harvesting, drying, Saffron is the most expensive spice for good reason, but growing your own saffron and processing enough for a years supply is pretty easy. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult Saffron is the most expensive spice in the world. How much does saffron cost? thousands of dollars a pound! However, it is relatively easy to grow, and since it is very potent and only a small amount is needed in cooking, it is easy to grow and process your own in your garden or homestead. Just don't try to grow saffron for profit unless you like long hours and low profits! Saffron crocus, crocus sativa, is a small blue flower that blooms in the fall and grows during the winter. Each flower contains only 3 small red saffron threads, which are the female pollen receptacles. The threads are plucked by hand and dried to make the spice saffron, which is also used to dye cloth and give food a yellow color. It has a distinctive flavor as well as being used for traditional medicine. It is used to treat cancer and cardiovascular disease and depression. Saffron is a corm, not a bulb. To properly plant saffron, the corms are planted in the early fall or late summer. They are eaten by gophers, voles, squirrels and other rodents. Planting in raised containers or wire lined beds can help deter rodents. After the flowers bloom, they will grow through the winter gathering energy for the following year's bloom. Growing your own saffron is easy. The corms are not the cheapest, but they multiply exponentially, so if you buy just 20 to 40, you'll have a lot of plants soon enough. A bed about 4 x 6 is a good size to shoot for if you are a moderate user. The corms should be divided every few years. They reproduce quickly by dividing underground. Most saffron is grown in the middle east and Mediterranean, like Iran, Afghanistan and Spain but the plant is fairly widely adapted and cold tolerant. See also the National Geographic Article, "The Secret History of the Worlds Priciest Spice"
Просмотров: 49215 SkillCult
2:00 Minute Technique:  Simple Deep Axe Handle Oiling System
 
02:08
It took me years to recognize a few simple principals in handle oiling that make a big difference in the finished product. For more on oiling handles and on drying oils, watch the long version of this video here: https://youtu.be/kVDyClbVl2A Read the blog post accompanying this video: http://skillcult.com/blog/2016/12/19/my-simple-deep-penetrating-axe-handle-oiling-system this is the oil I bought recently. It was the best price I could find. I may have ordered it directly from Pipping rock though. I can't remember: http://amzn.to/2hTgOY7 Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: http://www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult https://www.instagram.com/skillcult/ When oiling axe and other wooden tool handles, you can nourish and fill the wood with drying oil for a long lasting, well sealed protective finish. The keys are to use raw linseed oil and to apply it steadily and repeatedly for a long period of time. I usually apply it as long as the handle will still soak up oil. I'm pleased to say the Dudley Cook recommends the same in the axe book. I'm currently oiling a haldle that has probably been in progress for nearly a week and is still slurping up oil, even though I oil it about 3 to 6 times a day most days. When it is finished, it will be deeply penetrated and the rind near the surface will be very saturated. Once the drying linseed oil cures into a tough plastic like substance, you have something like a compound substance of stabilized wood. This is entirely different than occasional coats of linseed oil or danish finish. It is not a surface finish it is a deep seal filling the woods pores where there was once water in the living tree. See my blog post for this video for more.
Просмотров: 11341 SkillCult
Fleshing Deer Hides for Tanning or Drying, Natural Leather Tanning
 
08:19
Showing how to flesh deer hides for drying or tanning while preparing a skin for braintanning. More details below. Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe to my channel for more insightful Self Reliance related content: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Check me out on Instagram and Facebook as SkillCult and on Flickr as Steven Edholm. The first step in any tanning process is usually fleshing, where unwanted meat, fat and membrane are removed from the skin. Skins should be fleshed before drying skins in most cases as well. Deer skins are usually very easy to flesh. The hide should be fleshed while fresh and not allowed to dry out at all. If it becomes dry, resoak before fleshing. The fleshing knife should usually be a little bit sharper than that used for removing the grain when making buckskin. The tool is sharpened and then dulled back down until it will not shave the thumbnail too easily, and won't grab on the thumbnail if gently tapped. If it is to sharp, you may gouge or tear holes in the skin. The fleshings can be buried near fruit trees or put into a biochar catch pit.
Просмотров: 425710 SkillCult
Thoughts on Sharpening Axes, While Sharpening My Axe
 
06:15
A moment while sharpening my axe to go chop some wood. Basic Axe sharpening tips and comment on sharpening axes. The stone I use is a cut off end of King 1000/250 combination stone off Amazon. See my video on that with link here: https://youtu.be/0JpksGRhvf8 Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 13042 SkillCult
Making a Black Jack, Traditional English Leather Beer Mug, From the Ground Up
 
11:48
In this project I attempt to rekindle a lost art, just what I like doing! Only so much is known about how leather mugs, bottles and pitchers were made, so the project was a relative success considering. I learned about them originally from John Waterer's book Leather and Craftsmanship ( http://amzn.to/1lqjBs0 ). The black jack is fun to drink from, light, and seems pretty durable. This video V. 2.0 replaces the previous poorly edited one. I used vegetable tanned leather that I made of bullskin tanned in oak bark. The leather was pounded with a smooth faced mallet while damp to make it more dense and less spongy. The forms were turned on a lathe out of douglas fir from the seasons firewood. The two clamp boards were also made of this, hewn out with a hatchet. A metal ring was also made in a simple ground forge to form the bottom of the cup over a wooded piece. The wet leather was nailed to the clamp boards and then they were clamped together. After the pieces dried overnight, it was all put together, cut to shape and sewn with waxed linen thread. The next day, the form was cut into pieces with a tapered central piece that could be easily removed. The cup was soaked in hot water at 85 to 90 degrees C until it shrank significantly. The form pieces were pounded back in to stretch the mug back into it's proper shape and it was dried thoroughly. The inside was coated with pine resin and the outside with linseed oil and lampblack. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 23086 SkillCult
Bucking Without Sucking, Toward Efficient Axe Notches, Cordwood Challenge
 
04:21
Bucking with an axe is simple in principal, but most beginners will make predictable mistakes in chopping bucking notches. It is important to have a plan and stick with it, concentrating on accuracy and adherence to a proven geometry. The mistake is not failing to cut an excellent notch, but rather not having the intent to do so as closely as possible and maintaining your focus on that intent throughout. Focus on accuracy over speed or power. The ability to combine accuracy with speed and power will grow over time. In a future video, I'll talk about the psychology behind common mistakes when chopping bucking notches with an axe. There are a few mistakes that are very common in chopping notches when bucking. These pitfalls are so common as to be somewhat universal. Essentially, notches are made too narrow or the axe is held at too high of an angle. Narrow notches create a lot of extra work. More blows are required in a narrow notch because the axe angle is high. Each blow does less cutting and transmits more shock through the handle. As soon as you see that a notch is too narrow, go back and fix it. It is almost always less work to go back and widen the notch than to keep nibbling away in a narrow one. Better to start off right, but things go awry, so fix it as soon as you notice. For a good example of clean technique see Ben in this video: https://youtu.be/0vK72seeHk0 Amazing competition technique in this video: https://youtu.be/CalUcfNAcBY For the common mistakes of cutting at a high angle and too narrow, see this video: https://youtu.be/4j7GEDR9cpI
Просмотров: 12513 SkillCult
Simple Biochar Trench Method, Like a Cone Kiln for Long Wood
 
07:44
This uses the same concept as the japanese cone kiln for biochar production, but in a long format. The long dimension makes for a great savings in energy spent cutting wood if you are starting with long material. Even wood that is too long for the trench can usually be burned off instead of cut. Should be good for biochar production on ranches and homesteads with quantities of long material like poles, branches, bamboo, and and other long stuff, but could be adapted to smaller batches and smaller material by blocking part of it off. Pretty cheap and pretty versatile. For more on Cone Kilns and similar stuff: http://backyardbiochar.net/ Turkeysong Experimental Homestead: http://turkeysong.wordpress.com/ Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 25511 SkillCult
Real! Pre-1900 Shelf Stable Apple Butter, a Lost Art
 
08:00
There may be some confusion about the proportions. The proportions in old recipes seemed to mostly fall between equal parts of juice to whole unpeeled apples, or somewhat less apples than juice. So, for instance a barrel of juice and a little less than a barrel of apples. So, probably a ratio of somewhere between 1 to 1 and 1 to .75 juice to apples would work fine. I pretty much guestimated mine, but leaned toward using more juice than not. The apples are then peeled and cored before adding to the boiled juice, they are only measured whole for convenience. I think the reason all the accounts are written that way is that you would be making cider and saving out a certain quantity of apples to add, which is easier to do obviously without peeling the apples first. Apple butter evolved before there were canning jars. This is my project to learn how to make apple butter the old way, so that it will keep without canning. I did a lot of research, cooked up a couple of test batches and things went pretty well. One difference is that there is a large portion of juice used, more juice than apples. The juice is boiled down, before adding cored and peeled apples. The whole lot is cooked down into a smooth paste, which used to be stored away in crocks and could keep for many years, apparently even improving in quality. The question now is how long will mine keep and what are the factors involved in whether it keeps or now. Some old information says that it keeps, and other information says it can sometimes spoil when warm weather begins in the spring and summer. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 12780 SkillCult
Great Oil Finishes on Tool Handles Using Natural Drying Oils, Like Linseed
 
17:32
How to use drying oils to finish and maintain your tool handles. Also, a little about drying oils and the difference between toxic boiled linseed oil and raw linseed oil. Amazon link to raw linseed oil http://amzn.to/1q12f6Z You can shop around, but I like using the food grade stuff. The Sunnyside oil smells like solvents, not sure what's up with that. This is actually cheaper or close to the same price. This is an affiliate link, so if you use it I'll make a token amount of money, and that's good! As usual with me, this is the long version. I'm more here to help people understand materials and the world we live in than just to show steps on how to do things. Drying oils are awesome for finishing wooden tool handles. They make a tough, grippy, durable, beautiful surface finish that will never flake off. Discussed are types of oils and why drying oils work for this purpose and how I actually go about applying oil and maintaining the finish. Just my personal experience and understanding, glad to hear anyone else's in the comments. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 32090 SkillCult
AXE BUYERS CHECKLIST, #2 Symmetry and Alignment
 
09:54
Common Axe Defects part two.Symmetry and alignment in new and used axes. What to look for, or avoid when buying an axe. Series playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL60FnyEY-eJAZHhsgkKxi0sgSgrlW6IxA Thank you everyone for the views, shares and support :D Buy less, but buy it through my Amazon Affiliate links! Shopping through my Amazon links generates revenue for me, at no extra cost to you: Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Patreon keeps me doing more of what I do. Thank you patrons! http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe to my channel for more insightful Self Reliance related content: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult/subscribe Instagram and Facebook @SkillCult when buying used or new axes, there are numerous problems that you might encounter. this video covers the symmetry and alignment of old and new heads. Crooked eyes and crooked bits are very common.
Просмотров: 3508 SkillCult
Home Tanning Skills:  Slipping Hair from Skins
 
07:48
Freaky sexy atlas elbow gloves. seriously, when am I going to see a pop star wearing these? http://amzn.to/1n4fpj0 Aside from the chic popstar quality, I love these things and would buy another pair in a second if they got lost. They seem really tough and they keep my hands clean and dry 100%. I've tried to use short gloves before, like dish washing gloves and they inevitably fill with liquid because they're just too short. Actually better not to wear anything at all, which is what I've done for years until I got these. Only caveat, they have somewhat short fingers. I got the medium and they are just passable. If you have long fingers, you should probably order a size up if possible. I've had this apron for a long time, and haven't ordered and tested any other ones. I can recommend though getting a professional grade that is backed with cloth of some kind and not just plastic. This one is probably 20 years old or more and still going strong. If you're just starting out, you don't need any of that stuff. Use a plastic bags or something., But if you keep doing it or deal with other wet/gross stuff, they are super nice to have, especially the gloves. This is a short video showing a few important details relating to removing the hair from skins after liming. It is a simple and easy process, but there are still mistakes that can be made, and commonly are. The important points are to have a smooth beam, padding when necessary, use a dull tool, use the tool to drag the hair out of the skin rather than to scrape it off, and be as gentle as lamb. Previous to this step is liming which loosens the hair. That will be covered in another video. If a liming video is done my the time you read this, it will be in my tanning videos playlist. here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL60FnyEY-eJA7D2FJhI5AvWVx7oqjb4xX Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 12147 SkillCult
Uses of the Deer:  Removing and Trimming Hooves for Rattles and Decorations
 
05:40
How to remove deer hooves for making rattles and decorations. The deer hoof is heated under the fire or in hot water until the hoof can be pulled off. Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe to my channel for more insightful Self Reliance related content: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Check me out on Instagram and Facebook as SkillCult and on Flickr as Steven Edholm. Deer hooves are easily removed if heated in very hot water or under the hot ashes of a fire, after which they can be pulled off with the hand or pliers. They are used to make rattles and decorations.
Просмотров: 5431 SkillCult
Leeks in Biochar Test Bed Much Larger and Greener
 
06:52
Showing a new leek bed with much better growth in sections with biochar added three years previous. In spite of similar treatment, the leeks in the sections with charcoal are doing much better and obviously making better use of the resources I've added to the bed. Support my channel by using this link when you shop on Amazon: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 4138 SkillCult
One Cord in 3 Months With an Axe Finished!, Some Stuff I Learned
 
11:56
Resources listed below: I finished cutting a cord of wood with an axe over about three months. That includes all felling, limbing, bucking into 16 inch stove lengths and any splitting. I purposefully didn't use any saws or a splitting maul so that I would be forced to do difficult things and test the limits of the tools, myself and my skills. I learned a lot more than I can cover in this quick video and I"m not thrilled about how it turned out. I will be writing a blog post soon going into much more depth. Next season, I'll be challenging the axe interested to join me in the same challenge. There is much to be learned from putting yourself out there with a simple tool to do work that is directly related to your own needs. In the meantime, here are a few resources I can recommend without feeling like I need to make much in the way of qualifications. Please feel free to leave recommendations of other resources in the comments. Bushcraft by Mors Kochanski: http://amzn.to/1WR7uV8 The Axe Book by Dudley Moore: http://amzn.to/1sgGUbp Mor's video on Axe Use and Safety: https://youtu.be/2aijEY9njOw Ben Orford on Sharpening Axes: Not exhaustive, but I can recommend without reservation as the best axe sharpening video I've seen out there. This is more or less how I sharpen. I'll do my own sharpening video sooner or later: https://youtu.be/AKJhhz-643k Support my channel by using this link when you shop on Amazon: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 6153 SkillCult
Turkeysong Origami Seed Pocket/Packet/Envelope...(it's sow cool)
 
03:08
The Turkeysong seed pocket is my original origami seed packet design. It never spills even when holding very small seed, and it locks closed! A template for printing your own information on them is available, but you must have adobe illustrator to use it. Download here: http://www.mediafire.com/view/ocdtoceehz57myh/Turkeysong_Seed_Pocket_Template.ait These are a quarter sheet of 8.5 x 11 inch paper. If I need to fit more seeds I use a full sheet, but these hold quite a bit. I use these 1/4 sheet ones to give away seed at the farmer's market. I also keep a few in my wallet and use them like business cards. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 10844 SkillCult
Natural Leather Tanning: Common Mistake #1 Uneven Access to Liquors
 
04:38
The first of a series of videos on common mistakes made in tanning, in no particular order. The accompanying blog post is here, I recommend reading and watching: 2015/10/20/tanning-mistake-1-keep-it-moving This is about what size of containers to use and the fact that skins usually need to be moved around in order to be fully acted on by the tanning solutions. Many home tanners stuff skins in solutions, often in small containers, and leave them expecting them to work, but the solution doesn't have access to the folded parts of the skin. I show an obvious example, which is a skin put into oak bark liquor without stirring. Traditionally, skins were frequently overhauled or stirred to be sure all parts of the skin were exposed to the liquors. Now large liquid filled revolving drums are often used. Home tanners all make pretty much the same mistakes and I've probably made them all numerous times. In this series and in my other tanning videos, I'm laying a foundation for successful home tanning. All tanning videos will be archived in the tanning playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL60FnyEY-eJA7D2FJhI5AvWVx7oqjb4xX and there are also accompanying blog posts with pictures. I recommend reading the blog posts and watching the videos. All blog posts and videos will also be archived on my websites tanning page here: http://skillcult.com/tanning-and-leather Thanks for watching, liking and commenting. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 5787 SkillCult
How to Remove Backstrap Sinew Cleanly, Without Wasting Any Meat
 
06:35
In this video, I show how to remove the backstrap sinew cleanly and efficiently without wasting any meat. This is a goat, but it is pretty much the same on any large herbivore I've dealt with, like deer. This method is fast, easy, leaves almost no meat on the sinew and leaves the backstrap muscle in good condition. It should be removed right before butchering so that the muscle does not dry out. After removal, the sinew is scraped clean of meat, flattened and dried on a flat surface for later use. Backstrap sinew can be used for all the things other sinew can be used for, but it is generally reserved for uses that require a long strand, such as sewing thread and wrapping the feathers and points onto arrows. For tasks not requiring a long thread such as backing bows and those requiring a large amount of tendons, such as making bow strings, the leg tendons are usually used. Sinew can be stored a long time as long as it stays dry and you don't let your dog eat it. The real trick is to use a dull thin knife. I"ve use the backs of knives, sticks and various other things that were lying about, but a very thin dull edge rules the roost. (back strap) Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 7924 SkillCult
Uses of the Deer:  Removing Sinew, Tendons for Cordage, Bowstrings, Wrapping Arrows, Thread, Backing
 
03:47
Removing Sinew (tendons) from deer legs for drying. Sinew can be used for gluing to the backs of bows, wrapping stone arrow points and feathers onto arrows, making bowstrings and other cordage and as sewing thread. For how to remove backstrap sinew, see my other video here: https://youtu.be/Texv12eY0c4 Removing leg skins: https://youtu.be/WY2ao_pMj08 Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe to my channel for more insightful Self Reliance related content: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Check me out on Instagram and Facebook as SkillCult and on Flickr as Steven Edholm. Deer sinew is best removed from the tendon sheaths before drying.
Просмотров: 3752 SkillCult
Japanese Axe Puck Waterstone for $5.00! Gransfors/Wetterlings Alternative
 
09:32
Make a DIY Japanese waterstone axe puck for only 5.00, two sided whetstone. Best and Cheapest Axe Sharpening! Better than Lansky. Please use my links to order: King 250/1000 Grit: http://amzn.to/1OEZ9RC King 6000 good to compliment 280/1000 to finish tools very sharp. May be glued to a plastic base, read reviews: http://amzn.to/1OyLYfZ King 1000/6000 Good stone, good value, too bad it's not 4000/8000 though: http://amzn.to/23WKgMo Support my channel by using this link when you shop on Amazon: http://amzn.to/296alqr Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult You can make an axe puck that is probably as good or better than any others on the market for very cheap. This King brand 250/1000 grit stone is usually 20.00 or less. Since it is 8 inches, you can cut off one end to use for sharpening your axes, and still have a quality 6 inch two sided sharpening stone left over. The stone cuts fast, but is finer than any commercial axe puck I've seen on the market. Update: I've used this for two seasons. It is pretty thin, but it has worked very well and I"m perfectly happy with it. I will probably make another one when this is worn out. there is one new one on the market that I'll be testing, but otherwise, I think this is probalby by far the best stone for the money, if not just the best stone straight up. They wear fast and need to be ground flat occasionally, but it's very easy to flatten.
Просмотров: 19687 SkillCult
How to Clean, Cook and Eat Delicious Chicken Feet! With Bonus Kung Fu Chicken Foot Technique!
 
04:24
How to clean and cook yummy, nutritious chicken feet! There are lots of chicken foot recipes out there on youtube. Just adding my two cents. Chicken feet are rich in collagen and the amino acid glycine, which is important for balancing the intake of muscle meats which are low in glycine. They can also be used to make a gelatin base or stock. They are perfectly clean once the skin is peeled off, and they're fun to eat. The feet are dipped in boiling hot water briefly then peeled before cooking for a a couple hours. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 31518 SkillCult
HillBilly Science in 5 min. It’s Not the AXE WEIGHT, But MOMENTUM That Chops Wood!
 
05:28
It is not axe weight that does the chopping wood, it is MOMENTUM, which is the product of MASS and VELOCITY. With any given axe, you can change velocity only, to increase momentum cutting power. Watch a deeper video on this subject: https://youtu.be/86TExbEAAhY Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe to my channel for more insightful Self Reliance related content: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Check me out on Instagram and Facebook as SkillCult and on Flickr as Steven Edholm. It is often said that you should "let the weight of the axe do the work", or "let the axe do the work". While those sayings are meant to teach important lessons, they are innaccurate and foster no understanding of the problem of momentum when using an axe. Momentum is what chops wood. The momentum of an axe head is a product of it's combined Mass and velocity, so it can only be changed be changing one of those two variables. We can choose a heavier axe, or we can swing the axe we have faster. When chopping down trees or working with an axe in the woods, the weight of the axe in our hands is fixed, but we can change the velocity at which the axe is swung to increase or decrease it's momentum. Momentum can be thought of as potential to do work. A still axe head, heavy or otherwise, can do no work. A moving axe head embodies a certain amount of energy that varies with it's speed. Another way to look at the problem is through the property of inertia. Interia means that a still body wants to stay still and a moving body wants to stay moving. When using an axe, we first break it's still inertia, which requires energy, then we swing the axe more or less hard to create what you might call forward inertia. This moving body has momentum, again as a product of it's combined mass and velocity. The tree or log we are chopping has the property of inertia in that it does not want to move. When the two collide, hopefully work is done, depending on strategy, aim, the condition of the axe etc. If you look at axes as a spectrum from very light to very heavy, the two extreme ends are going to be somewhere between unuseable and unsatisfactory. In between there is a happy zone where you can get work done efficiently by swinging light axes faster and heavy axes faster. This understanding of how some of the basic physics of an axe works, could help develop or refine technique in limbing, felling and bucking trees. But novice users should be very cautious about pushing the develpment of velocity too fast. There could hardly be any better way to get oneself in trouble with an axe than to chop ahead of our skill level and try to apply too much power. Concentrate on accuracy and strategy. It doesn't matter if you hit the wood hard if you hit it at the wrong angle or way off target. Don't chop like a meat head. Get the axe moving, then let it do it's work. Don't try to push or force the axe through the wood, that doesn't work very well. Create momentum by increasing velocity, with the least movement and energy you can, then let the momentum of the head do it's work.
Просмотров: 5562 SkillCult
BuildCult Ep.1, Seashell Lime Burn in "The Pet", Primitive Straw Kiln
 
19:51
In this video, I show how to build a kiln from straw and clay and use wood to burn shells for lime. Lime is one of the most useful substances ever and great to have on hand for maker, builder, experimenter, alchemist types! It is used in smelting and refining, food processing like sugar and tortillas, for mortar and plasters, it is the main ingredient in cement. it can be mixed with milk protein for milk paints and glue, in preparing skins for tanning and much more. Lime is not only easy to make from limestone or shells, it's hella fun! If you want to really know how to do this, just watch the educational/how-to version of this video and or read the stuff I've written about lime and lime burning, linked below. If you want to know all about lime and it's uses in building, read the definitive book, Building With Lime by Holmes and Wingate.http://amzn.to/1ZHXaMa Shells or limestone are burned at about 900 Celsius driving off the carbon leaving quicklime (calcium oxide). Water is added to the calcium oxide to slake the lime. It creates lots of heat reacting with the water and changing into calcium hydroxide. Calcium hydroxide will keep indefinitely if stored under a layer of water as "lime putty" and actually improves with age. Once exposed to the air and allowed to dry, the calcium hydroxide turns back into calcium carbonate, which is what we started with, thus completing the lime cycle. http://skillcult.com/blog/2013/03/04/understanding-lime-an-introduction-to-forms-of-lime-and-where-they-come-from?rq=lime http://skillcult.com/blog/2013/10/27/lime-squad-iii-burning-lime-in-metal-drums-advantages-limitations-and-where-to-go-from-next?rq=lime http://skillcult.com/blog/2013/11/03/lime-squad-iv-the-pets-straw-clay-lime-kilns?rq=lime Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 34686 SkillCult
Vintage Swedish Hatchet Modification & Restoration 1 of ?: Making a Handle Blank
 
07:31
Part one of what I plan on making a series about modifying and handling a vintage hatchet. In this segment I make a handle blank and lay it aside to season. Next will be modifying and cleaning up the head, followed by putting the handle on, oiling the handle and making a sheath. Of course I’ll sharpen it too, and probably put on something to protect the handle from accidental damage below the head. This handle is made from Tan Oak. It is a wood that I had available and which I wanted to try out as a handle material. It is made from a fresh green log, which is split and the best sections chopped into handle blanks. Wood is easier to chop into shape when it is green. It is also less likely to crack if it is thinned out before curing. But, if it is cut all the way to shape, it is more likely to warp as the water leaves. There is a compromise where the wood can be thin enough that it is allowed to warp a little (which is actually good if it is inclined to warp, let it be while it’s drying as a rough blank), but there is still enough material left to carve it straight again. After seasoning for a couple of months it can be saved until needed. Of course you can also just make a plank and season it out to make whatever sort of handle you might need. In this case, I knew pretty much what I was after. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 6772 SkillCult
Foraging up Gourmet Mushrooms, Porcini, Coccora, Oyster, Puffballs...
 
22:42
A trip around the woods for two days collecting edible mushrooms. Lots of fun and very lucrative! For people that live on the west coast, you can't go wrong with this mushroom book, All The Rain Promises: http://amzn.to/2g0mkda Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult In the late fall here we get coccora and porcini mushrooms. I try to stock up when there are good mushrooms so that I can eat them all year. This year so far I’ve collected oyster mushrooms, coccoras, queen boletes (aka porcini), and what I think are butter boletes. Oh and one lion’s mane. I dry the porcini’s for later and freeze the coccora and oysters after a quick sauté in olive oil or butter. I prefer to cook the coccoras in chicken broth if I have it. Next the orange chantrelles will come up, then the black trumpets both of which have a very long season and are very durable mushrooms not much liked by bugs. Hopefull it will be a good year for both. The coccora and porcini peak very fast and then they are gone.
Просмотров: 12308 SkillCult
2016 Homestead Retrospective Part One, Land, Work, Animals,Projects, Nature
 
09:13
Part one of looking back on 2016 at some of the sights, sounds and activities of my homestead life. Lots of cool stuff to see and do. It was a pretty good year. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: http://www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skillcult/
Просмотров: 3039 SkillCult
Collecting Acorns for Tanning Leather (Bark tanning, natural, vegetable tan)
 
02:09
Everyone aways wants to know if you can tan leather with acorns. I've never done it, but I'm sure it's possible, though I have my doubts that it's practical. I'm collecting some acorns to tan a few small samples. These are Nolithocarpus densiflorus the Tan Oak or Tan Bark Oak. It is a very bitter acorn. I will probably also use the shells, either with the acorn meats or separate. The extra acorns will be raked up for the penelope the pig, my American Guinea Hog. Tan oak acorns dry very slowly in the shell, so I'm cracking these open to dry faster. I may dry a few to process for eating as well. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 5525 SkillCult
All About Potato Onions Pt. 3: Harvesting and Curing
 
07:39
Sometime in July my potato onions die back and can be harvested. Green mountain multiplier is ready a few weeks earlier than the yellow potato onions. They are pulled, trimmed up and laid out one layer thick to dry in the shade. My ebay account. Onions should go up for sale August 15th: http://www.ebay.com/usr/paleotechnics Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult The onions that are divide into cloves beneath the skin are the ones that are most likely to mold or rot. Eat those first and keep the rounder onions. It may be that there are ways to make them grow more round nice ones, but I haven't figured it out yet. Green Mountain Multiplier grows fewer divided onions that the heirloom yellow potato onions and any never varieties grown from seed should be selected for tendency to grow discreet, round, undivided bulbs. Once the bulbs are cured they should be stored in a cool dry place with air circulation and checked through every few weeks. They can also be braided into onion braids which is a great way to store them.
Просмотров: 4875 SkillCult
Look @ Snow and Neally Boy's Axe, and Taking Hiatus, 2 weeks
 
08:43
Review Snow and Neally Boy's Axe. "Our Best", they can do better. Super thick B grade handle with head hafted to one side. Head looks okay, but not for 70.00 when the Council Tool boys axe is available at 37.00 on Amazon... http://amzn.to/2lGwhii Council review here: https://youtu.be/885pvnfMAY8 Also taking a two week hiatus to get my life on track a little better. Hopefully that will go well and I'll be more effective trying to get my grafting and axework series' out this season. I hate to break the momentum I have going, but I need to get my act together. Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Donations via paypal: www.paypal.me/SkillCult Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: http://www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skillcult/ The Snow and Neally Our Best boy's axe has a full 28 inch handle and a specified 2 1/4 pound head, though I didn't take it off and weight it. It comes with a chrome tanned sheath. The sheath rivets are exposed since there is not welt and if you tip the sheath all the way to one side, the top corner of the axe is exposed a little bit. The head is well finished by modern standards. It claims to be ground in the factory, ready to chop, which I would disagree with for sure. That is generally to be expected, but it doesn't seem appropriate to say if it's not true. The handle is very thick. It's a dark colored hickory, not heartwood, but maybe a different species than the lighter colored hickory? It's too thick to use IMO. It could be shaved down, but the head is mounted pretty far off center. I also would call it A grade for sure. It claims to be select grade, but I would have selected it as B grade probably. Given the expensive price in comparison, the Council tool boy's axe seems like a much better buy. It comes with a usable handle that is easily tuned up with a little scraping. The head is rougher, on the council for sure and will require more filing or grinding.
Просмотров: 9917 SkillCult
Expensive Axe Buyer's Guide: (SPOILER ALERT, Don't Buy One)
 
17:40
Using, modifying, testing cheaper axes to find out what you want to be using and how to use it, makes more sense than relying on YouTube videos Forums and Axe manufacturers to tell you. Once you test that stuff out, you may find that you don't need to spend a lot of money on an axe. Support my channel by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me!: http://amzn.to/296alqr Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Check me out on Instagram and Facebook as SkillCult and on Flickr as Steven Edholm. Expensive axes like Wetterlings and Gransfors Bruks are probably not the best thing for beginners to learn on. I've owned one Gransfors, but I sold it, because it was very crooked and I wanted the money for other projects. I'm not convinced they are worth the cost or that the fact that they are shaped on presses, or "struck several times" is of any tangible benefit to real life users. I'm not saying that it's not, just that I'm not convinced. The world is full of inexpensive axes that are high quality and perfectly serviceable with less than an hour of filing and a new handle. Even a budget line new axe might be perfectly serviceable, though handle quality, alignment and quality consistency may very well be an issue, especially if they are ordered sight unseen. Common arguments might be that they are stronger and hold an edge longer, which I don't think are important enough for novices, if they are true at all, especially if you look at using a vintage head. Hand forged axes don't possess any giant advantage that will translate into more work done per amount of effort expended. If you imagine they will, you will be disappointed. Perhaps the most important point, which I may have skimmed over too much in this video, is that beginners don't know what they should want or prefer for themselves, and an axe company, no matter how old, is not likely the best to tell them that. The process of testing, modifying, weighing and feeling out what axe length, weight and design you might want is better carried out on cheap axes. You can go on forums, but there is no guarantee that the people there have the experience to validate their opinions. modifying and learning on expensive axes that will be devalued by damage and modification and expensive to re-handle with the manufacturers handle, makes little sense and most of the advantages are probably imagined. People are afraid to modify them because they are expensive and it is imagined that such a fine axe would be good to go out of the box. Ask yourself hard why you really want one before pulling the trigger. Homesteading and self reliance are not about working and saving money to buy the best fanciest tools that you plan to use one day. It's about working with what is available to you and being creative, resourceful, intelligent, thrifty and spending your time building skills and making due over making money, endlessly researching and buying stuff. Skills like restoring, handling, modifying and above all, using axes is what will serve you well, not that intriguing axe surrounded by mystery that you might think will do more work for you than the rusty head that you picked up at the flea market. If you want skills, you have to put skills before gear. If not, then, then I have no relevant argument against your axe fetish. Peace out.
Просмотров: 30809 SkillCult
One and a Half Years later....Harvesting Bulgarian Giant Leek Seeds
 
03:06
Harvesting seeds over one and a half years since starting the giant leek seed saving and imrpovement project. Bulgarian Giant Leek. Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe to my channel for more insightful Self Reliance related content: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Check me out on Instagram and Facebook as SkillCult and on Flickr as Steven Edholm. Over one and a half years ago I started some seeds to grow a crop of bulgarian giant leeks. The project was to save a batch of seed, while hopefully improving the variety some. The original seed I started with some years ago did not produce very uniform plants. I've improved it some over the years saving seed and culling out the worst plants,m but it still needs work. The plants have a long cycle to produce seed, starting the seeds in winter and collecting in the fall a full season later. Once harvested, the seeds dry in the pods slowly. When dry, the seeds will be rubbed out of the heads, dried and packaged for sale.
Просмотров: 2382 SkillCult
Luring Hens to Use a Nesting Box, Free Range Chickens
 
02:18
Something of a repeat from earlier this spring. One of the hens decided to find a new place to lay. They do that once in a while for whatever reasons they have. You can usually tell because they will run around sticking their beaks into everything, making a mess and making tons of noise. The rooster will usually follow a hen around making lots of noise with her. When it happens, it's best to provide a spot for them right away so that they won't decide to lay somewhere inconvenient or hidden. it isn't that hard to make them lay where you want them to lay. A slightly secluded elevated place with some padding that is at least partially enclosed and they will probably find it on their own. To be sure, you can always add an egg or two so that they think other hens are laying there. Support my channel by using this link when you shop on Amazon: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 2362 SkillCult
Steaming and Straightening the Bay Axe Handle
 
10:28
Steaming and straightening the bay axe handle I made from green wood a while back, which had warped in drying. The first steaming failed to keep it straight, so this time I make more of an effort. I soaked the handle before steaming and stretched the wood thoroughly to limber and stretch the fibers while the wood was hot and wet. The goal was to remove the memory of the wood that makes it want to revert back to it's warped shape. I've been using the axe quite a bit and it has stayed straight in spite of heavy flexing during use. Long term results may not be as good, but for now I'll call it a tentative success. Support my channel by using this link when you shop on Amazon: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 6142 SkillCult
Full Verison, Axe Only Firewood Processing With Commentary, Cordwood Challenge
 
21:44
RE-UPLOADING, FIRST UPLOAD WAS MISSING JUST A FEW MINUTES. Processing firewood with an axe, felling, limbing, Lopping, bucking and chopping with commentary. Preparing wood for a video on splitting axe cut wood with an axe. Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult All steps in the processing of firewood can be done with an axe. In this video, I fell a tree, limb it, lop off the smaller sections at the top, then buck the remaining trunk into sections for a wood splitting video I'm planning to do. The most lkely problem a skilled worker is to encounter is splitting large rounds of wood with an axe, or splitting long logs of large diameter, but even a small axe can be surprisingly effective for average log rounds. Felling with an axe can be very dangerous depending on the circumstances. The front notch is cut first, about half way through the tree or so. The back cut is made higher by about 2 inches, which helps keep the log from kicking back as it falls. It behooves any would be well rounded axeist to learn to chop offhand, with their non-dominant side. There are may situations that one can find themselves in where doing so is either necessary, safer, or easier in some way. Limbing is very dangerous and requires constant vigilance and adaptation by the axeman. Limbs are best cut flush to the trunk, or as close to flush as possible. Limb stubs left behind are an annoyance. They snag each other, clothing, and make stacking, loading, unloading and carrying more difficult. stubby trunks and rounds are the signs of a novice. Lopping off pieces of a suspended trunk is a very efficient way to process the smaller wood at the top of a tree or a protruding limb, but it is very dangerous if some important strategies are not employed. You have to be able to hit the target for sure. You also have to understand how the axe might travel if it cuts through or the branch is missed, or the axe glances off in order to position the body safely. The direction of cut is also very important. The axe blade should be aimed and pushed away from where your body is, so that any accidents or slips are less likely to hurt you. If none of that makes any sense, I recommend not doing it until it starts to. Bucking is fun with a sharp axe and reasonable skill. Accuracy and an effective strategy will reduce the number of cuts and the amount of energy needed. splitting wood with an axe can be very effective. The next axe video will be about splitting axe cut wood with an axe. Strategy, reading the wood, and being constantly vigilant about your safety and the safety of your axe can yield very good results.
Просмотров: 23897 SkillCult
Review of 5 Axe Handles from House Handle Company , Seek Elsewhere
 
08:39
How do you find a good quality, straight axe handle? Not from these guys. A batch of select grade axe handles from House Handle co. Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: http://www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skillcult/
Просмотров: 6474 SkillCult
Expensive Axes Vid Follow up, Afterthoughts, Comments, Emphasis and Carlification
 
14:00
Following up on the video about buying expensive axes. Just some clarifications and thoughts. Support my channel by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me!: http://amzn.to/296alqr Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Check me out on Instagram and Facebook as SkillCult and on Flickr as Steven Edholm.
Просмотров: 13079 SkillCult
PENETRATION - SATURATION - COATING, Oiling Wooden Tool Handles
 
13:55
3 Major approaches or factors in oiling wooden tool handles with drying oils, like linseed. Pentration, Saturation and coating or finish. Finishes aim to form a barrier between the environment and the wood. A combination of penetration and saturation together fills the wood forming something like a finish that is embedded deeply in the wood protecting the wood fibers directly from the intrusion of moisture by repelling water as well as filling in the spaces that water would enter into the wood. Coating is faster and cheaper, but less effective and subject to wearing away with use. Relatively cheap food grade flax oil: http://amzn.to/2BDneHH Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe to my channel for more insightful Self Reliance related content: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Check me out on Instagram and Facebook as SkillCult and on Flickr as Steven Edholm.
Просмотров: 11376 SkillCult
Radical Coffee Grounds Fertilizer Experiment, Peas Buried in Coffee Grounds
 
02:53
A somewhat radical experiment in using coffee grounds as fertilizer on Peas, which are always said to prefer low acid soils and plenty of lime. Keep me making Content as a patreon supporter: http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: http://www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skillcult/ There is some fear out there about using coffee grounds as fertilizer because they contain acidic tannins. I have used them a lot and use them more and more with impunity. I thought I would do an experiment using coffee grounds to grow peas. The objective is to see if and how they are affected by various amounts and purity of coffee grounds. In two of the four test sections, the coffee grounds were cut with ashes in a ratio of coffee:ashes of 9:1 and 4.5:1 A third section was covered with pure used coffee grounds. The 4th section has no grounds, but I sprinkled on some ashes. The ashes are alkaline, so may balance the acidity of the coffee grounds. Peas make their own nitrogen, so they may not really need any of it, but since they are always said to prefer sweet soils, I thought it would be an interesting test. Excessive nitrogen may cause other problems as well, but will it? We follow these rules that some how just exist, but how often do we test them or trace their origins? The conception of ph of soils and their effects are thought of in extremely simplistic terms by most of us. From my personal experience and what I've gathered from book learning and other experienced farmers and gardeners, it's anything but simple. we can speculate and research or just play it safe, but testing things is fun and with a single crop of peas at stake, the risk is pretty low! I had planned larger and more radical eperiments, but maybe next year.
Просмотров: 3080 SkillCult
Homesteading Tips: Clean & Unclog a Horizontally Drilled Spring or Well
 
03:46
My spring clogs every year or two and I have to clean it out or it slows to a trickle. I know other people who have had this problem and didn't know they could clean out the pipe. One of them even drilled a new spring or well thinking the old one had gone bad. This is a horizontally drilled spring, so it was drilled at a slight upward angle back into the hillsize at least 30 feet and the hole is lined with a perforated 1 inch pipe. I use 3 lengths of 1/2 inch copper pipe to clean out my 1 inch spring pipe. They are soldered together with couplers and the end has some crude teeth filed into it for cutting through the roots like a saw. You have to twist the cleaner as well as push it. It cuts through the wads of roots and they eventually are pushed out of the spring by water pressure. After cleaning mine is usually good for one to two years before it needs cleaning again. The process of cleaning the spring takes about 20 minutes. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 2154 SkillCult
2016 Homestead Retrospective Part 3, Projects, Sights and Sounds.
 
09:38
Whew, part 3 done! It was a busy year. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: http://www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skillcult/ Apple breeding, Giant Leeks, saffron, pineapple guavas…
Просмотров: 1659 SkillCult
Splitting Wood By Hand #5, Just Splittin' Some Wood (chopping wood, not)
 
11:18
Wood splitting series play list: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... RECOMMENDED VIEWING BELOW This section of my wood splitting series is just putting into practice what I've been talking about. It offers an opportunity for subconscious visual learning, which I think it invaluable. This is not the best or only way, it is what works for me due to a combination of personal preferences, physical factors, the tools I have access to, the wood I split, etc... Wood splitting videos worth checking out. I had to sift through a load of crap to find these few gems! Damn, can anyone say badass? I like the horizontal splits. Been playing with that for smaller pieces. https://youtu.be/ZMTnhDr8Wa4 And another bad ass! A serious professional. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17Hnp... Score one for the badass ladies. Show 'em how it's done! This is Pamela Paquin who started a roadkilled fashion fur business, way cool! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kTIS... And another beautiful and talented wood splitting woman. Delicate and graceful, but effective. And splitting over rocks even. Just beautiful. this is one of the Vido Daughters. I have communicated with them about scythes and other self reliance/tool stuff. Lovely people, check out their youtube channel, scytheconnection These people are the real deal, rare authenticity! When they talk, people should listen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fWo0... This guy split professionally with a relatively light and very thin axe he designed just for splitting. Entirely different than my generally heavy handed approach. Here he races a hydraulic splitter. Also splits wooden matches lengthwise! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95Z2U... Eustace Conway. A remarkable man in general and subject of the book The Last American Man. I met him when I was 19. He blanked out a piece of wood for me with his hatchet. I was trying to make a bowl out of it, but I only had a swiss army knife. It was the first time I saw anyone use a hatchet with any proficiency, a Eureka moment for sure. I've been in love with axes and hatchets ever since. Anyway, his technique is interesting. Poetry in motion! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHk6j... I like this guy's video. His wood is easy splitting and sounds/looks frozen, which makes it even easier, but he's using a small short handled axe and he clearly knows what he's doing. He's got the speed building rotation around the wrists thing going on too. Also, very interested in his hit actually off of the far edge of the round thing. I'll definitely be playing with that. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H10hV... This guy is great. he's got a big old axe and is just totally freakin' berzerk, but very effective and deadly accurate! I'd love to see what that axe could do to some of the harder wood I split here in such efficient hands. It's nice to use an axe when it does the job it just sort of slides on through, unlike the fat maul bits I use most of the time, but when axes jam up, the narrow bit sinks in deep and is a lot harder to pull out. https://youtu.be/P32JDvu0b-0 Watch beginning of part 2 as well. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YyWvB... Again though, with the very straight, grained soft, easy splitting wood. Here's another one I'm adding of an axe splitter, double bit and lots of splitting of horizontal wood on the ground. This guy knows what he's up to son! https://youtu.be/K5TfKdsYycg Okay, this guy is a true Berzerker :D https://youtu.be/lptKgr3PS3I Lengthwise splitting, common in scandinavia and Germany. Wood is cut into manageable lengths, split, seasoned transported and then cut to final length. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGVZkS1H_mw Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 9607 SkillCult
Collecting, cleaning, drying and storing black trumpet mushrooms fast, (a.k.a. horn of plenty)
 
11:11
How to collect, clean and dry black trumpet mushrooms efficiently from someone who has probably cleaned hundreds of pounds of them. For more from me on Black Trumpet mushrooms, see my blog post @- https://turkeysong.wordpress.com/2012/04/05/black-trumpets/ My Homesteading type blog: http://turkeysong.wordpress.com Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 6045 SkillCult
Axe Handle Shock & Preventing Repetitive Stress Injury in Chopping
 
11:19
These are factors I know of that play a role in the amount of shock you absorb from your axe handle, such as chopping style, grip, handle rigidity, cutting ability and wood type. These are the kinds of things that can allow a person cut more, longer and in harder wood without incurring numb sore hands, tendonitis, etc. Hair by Gretchen Unlimited. More text below. You Can Help Keep Me Making Content as a Patreon Supporter. http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: http://www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skillcult/ Chopping with an axe is a high impact, high energy exercise. As choppers, we necessarily absorb some of that energy since we are holding the tool. There are a number of factors I know of which are important in the cause or prevention of repetitive stress injury or discomfort in chopping, most of them at least partially controllable most of the time. The axe should not be gripped very hard while chopping unless as necessary in specific situations. A hard grip tires and stresses the hands necessarily, but it also creates a more efficient transfer of energy from the axe handle vibration into the hands. The Style of chopping is also important and interrelated to grip. A heavy handed chopping style should be avoided. Don't think of chopping as pushing or forcing the axe through the wood, but rather as whipping or throwing the axe head into the wood using the handle. Pushing on the handle after the axe hits the wood adds little if any real power to the cut, but stresses the handle and the hands and probably sacrifices control to some extent. You can cut plenty deep if you build velocity in the axe head before it hits the wood. If the work is done before the axe hits the wood, then the grip is only to lightly control the axe after it strikes. The handle of the axe, depending on it's thickness, density, inherent flexibility of the wood and probably other factors, will transmit more or less shock. Thin handles transmit considerably less shock than thick ones do and tuning your handle or thinning it down is probably mentioned by authors writing about axes more often than not. Older axes tend to have thinner handles than modern axes. Vintage axes, old photographs and older illustrations demonstrate this truth. There is a reason that axe handles have become thicker, which is that they aren't actually used very much. Most axes are now the equivalent of handbags for men, and are put to real use only infrequently for short periods of time. If you cut into wood at an angle, usually around 45 degrees, it cuts more easily than if the cut is made at a right angle. When cutting at 90 degrees the axe stops suddenly and more of the energy embodied in the head is transferred to your hands rather than cutting into the wood. It's fine to cut at 90 degrees as needed, but generally a poor habit to get into on a regular basis. Most axe work is done with cuts around 45 degrees for a reason. Another way to transfer a lot of the energy embodied in an axe head back up the handle and into your hands is to use an axe that is not cutting well for any number of reasons. The axe must cut well and easily or it will stop suddenly causing more vibration. Most axes as the come from the factory, nearly all, require at least some reshaping to get them cutting well. In most cases, a significant amount of metal needs to be removed from the sides of the axe near the bit in order for it to be able to slide easily into the wood. It is often recommended to file the cheek of an axe in a fan shape, but that depends on the shape of the axe to start with. Finally, the wood plays a role. When chopping hard dry wood, less of the energy from each blow of the axe is dissipated in cutting, whereas when cutting soft and green woods, the energy is dissipated gradually as the axe sinks deeply into the cut. You may or may not be able to control what wood you end up cutting, but you can control other factors that cause or prevent the kind of handle shock and fatigue that might keep your from working or cause a longer term injury that will put you off work for a while. The stuff mentioned here is important if a person want's to be able to use an axe under varied conditions, for longer periods of time, on consecutive days. What separates the men from the boys isn't being tough enough, young enough or dumb enough to tolerate a club of a handle or an axe that otherwise doesn't cut well, but to be wise enough to work smart and not hard. Attention to the details that matter means that you'll be able to work longer, get more done for the amount of energy expended and do it day after day under varied and challenging conditions.
Просмотров: 15173 SkillCult
Book Review, Norwegian Wood, Chopping, Drying and Stacking Wood the Scandinavian Way
 
03:29
This is a short review about the Norwegian book Norwegian Wood, Chopping, Drying and Stacking Wood the Scandinavian Way http://amzn.to/1WYOKAx by Lars Mytting, recently translated into English. The book is part human interest and part technical/informational. It is a good read, well written, well researched, nice looking, and it seems like a quality printing. I enjoyed reading it and learned some good stuff that I didn't know. You can read my somewhat more detailed and coherent written review here: http://skillcult.com/blog/2015/10/12/reviewing-norwegian-wood-chopping-stacking-and-drying-wood-the-scandinavian-way-by-lars-mytting Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 4660 SkillCult
How I Process Deer Legs for Sinew, Skins, Bones, Hooves and Glue Stock
 
16:37
I have processed tons of deer legs over the years acquired from hunters who don't want them. Processing in quantity forced me to become fast and understand what is and is not worth doing or keeping. I think the way I was taught to remove sinew is inefficient because it creates extra work and that seems to be the way most people do it. The main sinew cords are best removed separately from the underlying sheath-like tendon below it. The sheath seems to be weaker and does not process as easily. You can shred it if you want to, but it is still easier to remove them separately and that will save time in processing when you inevitably remove the tendon from the dried up sheath. There is a lot of connective tissue in the whole foot and lower leg, almost no meat and usually not very much fat. This connective tissue can be cooked into glue. See my glue making series for how to cook and dry the glue. https://youtu.be/lQtGLLFBhbc?list=PL60FnyEY-eJCPd_eQyiP4JE6RLtCgmNxE Glue is not made from the actual hoof which is more like hair than skin, so hoof glue is a misnomer. What it should refer to is glue made by cooking the feet and lower legs (sometimes known as trotters) to dissolve the large quantities of connective tissue in the foot into a glue solution. There is a lot of fat inside the foot and leg bones which is where neatsfoot oil comes from, but I'd recommend to start your glue making with materials that are free from fat or meat, like the tendons and tendon sheaths. The hooves are removed from the legs by cooking briefly in hot water. It doesn't have to be boiling, you can just bring it to a boil and take it off the stove. Don't cook the feet too long, just a minute or so and the hooves should pop off pretty easily. To remove hooves from deer legs in a campfire, just roast them in the ashes beneath the coals for a minute or two and pop them off. Bone will crack like wood when it dries. To season the large bones, remove them, scrape off the fleshy stuff and oil the entire surface before drying slowly. The smaller bones rarely crack. You can bury them for one year and dig them up. I'll show you tricks for cleaning them sometime. Another good reason to subscribe to my channel! In fact, we'll surely be revisiting some of these parts in other projects or how to videos. For now I just wanted to show how to remove the sinew and stuff. The lower leg skin is often referred to as the hock skin, although I don't think that is anatomically correct. it can be cooked for glue or skinned out with the dew claws (small hooves) and then sewn into bags and such. Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, and a big help to me!: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 14907 SkillCult
All About Potato Onions #1, Intro to and varieties of (Perennial Multiplier Onions)
 
09:13
Part of a planned series. Introduction to potato onions and briefly discussing different varieties. For more on Potato onions visit my website. http://skillcult.com/search?q=potato%20onions If you want to buy potato onions from me, my ebay user name is paleotechnics. Potato onions are perennial multiplier onions. You plant one onion bulb and it divides into a cluster of new bulbs, which are harvested, some being saved aside to replant. They used to be more common in home gardens and were produced commercially for early onions. now they are rare and not grown commercially at all. Being uncommon, they can be hard to find and if you are going to buy them from any source, do it early in the season as most sources seem to sell out quickly. I have been growing potato onions for well over 10 years . There are two Heirloom varieties as far as I know, the yellow and white. They are very different and seem to have very little in common besides growing clusters of bulbs. The white potato onion does not keep that well and tends to go to flower a lot. The Yellow potato onion keeps very well once cured and in most areas and seasons, flowering is uncommon. The yellow potato onion is more similar to a shallot than the white potato onion is to either. Shallots also keep well, and there may be little practical difference. I would say the yellow potato onion is probably sweeter and milder than the average shallot, but honestly I'm not a good judge. Future videos in this series will cover Planting potato onions, growing potato onions, Harvesting, curing and storage. In the meantime, visit my website for more information, including Historic stuff http://skillcult.com/search?q=potato%20onions Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 16581 SkillCult
State of the Homestead Address 2017
 
24:28
Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr I would have liked to have said a lot more, but this will do. A sit down chat about where I'm at with the project and where I'd like to be headed this year. Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: http://www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skillcult/
Просмотров: 8858 SkillCult
The Magic Ingredients That Turn Skin Into Leather, Barks, Roots and Leaves for Natural Hide Tanning
 
12:13
Barks, Roots, Fruits, Nuts and Leaves are used for their tannic acid to tan skins. Tannin converts hides permanently into leather. Oak, hemlock, fir, mangrove, wattle, eucalyptus, acorn caps, sumac, pine, spruce, willow and many more have been used all around the world for this process that seems almost magical in it's ability to transform fragile, rot prone skin into a material with much loved unique properties. Natural Leather Tanning relies heavily on these tradtional materials. The full article and list can be read at Http://www.skillcult.com/blog/tanningmaterials My Playlist of Tanning Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL60FnyEY-eJChUzoIGCqYE20rpjbfOgfc Full Bark Tanning Process in This Video Series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL60FnyEY-eJCcE3gKzj0GkadKlSF_8xbj Thank you everyone for the views, shares and support :D Buy less, but buy it through my Amazon Affiliate links! Shopping through my Amazon links generates revenue for me, at no extra cost to you: Amazon Store: http://skillcult.com/amazon-store/ Patreon keeps me doing more of what I do. Thank you patrons! http://www.patreon.com/skillcult Subscribe to my channel for more insightful Self Reliance related content: http://www.youtube.com/skillcult/subscribe Instagram and Facebook @SkillCult Tanning with tannic acid from plants is called vegetable tanning. The collagen protein in the skin is converted into leather when the tannic acid combines with it permanently. Leather is not longer skin, it is a compound material of tannin and skin. It resists heat better than raw skin, and is remarkably resistant to rotting. Tannic acid is common in the plant world and many different barks, roots, leaves, nuts, fruits and pods are used to convert cattle, deer, elk, buffalo, rabbit, squirrel, goat and sheep skins into leather. Both skins with the hair on and with the hair removed can be vegetable tanned.
Просмотров: 6600 SkillCult
Grafting Dwarf Interstem Apple Trees 2/3: Grafting the parts together
 
10:42
Grafting interstem apple trees in one year instead of two. I think most interstems are grafted by budding, which would require two years, but would also require less scion wood. If you have the materials, it's no problem to do it in one year. An inexpensive, but quality grafting knife is the Victorinox Gardener: http://amzn.to/1NKG0dN (affiliate link) If you have a Swiss army knife or similar pocket knife, you can use that for grafting and it should work just fine if it is truly sharp. If you want a real grafting knife that is sharpened on one side only, I have been using this one for a few years now and I like it a lot. It has a grippy handle, it's cheap and the bright color makes it hard to lose and easy to spot when you need it. It also has a thin and easy to sharpen blade, which comes very sharp. The only significant difference between this and the more expensive victorinox grafting knife is that the grafting knife has a flap lifter for budding, which isn't necessary unless you do a whole lot of budding, so don't waste your money for that extra feature. Having lost several grafting knives in the field, I highly recommend the neon yellow handled version. This is a pretty good video on basic dormant grafting using the whip and tongue. I don't do everything the same as they recommend, but it's good info. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMKBhIdE4SI My Blog posts on Interstem trees: https://turkeysong.wordpress.com/tag/interstem-grafting/Http: Support me by using this link whenever you shop on Amazon. Free for you, a big help to me: http://amzn.to/296alqr Visit the SkillCult Website and Blog: www.skillcult.com Subscribe here: www.youtube.com/skillcult
Просмотров: 4042 SkillCult